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Train Crash kills scores

Old 07-09-2013, 12:30 PM
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Default Train Crash kills scores

Very trajic. Train full of crude rolls out of control for seven miles then crashes in Canadian Town.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-23246450
Old 07-09-2013, 12:32 PM
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We don't want to build a pipeline to move oil so it moves on the rails.
Old 07-09-2013, 04:03 PM
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kinda weird. I heard local cops/fireman put out a fire in the main engine that was left running to supply air to brakes. when they did that, brakes let lose. sounds like a "failure to communicate" with the train owners to me.
Old 07-09-2013, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Boataholic View Post
kinda weird. I heard local cops/fireman put out a fire in the main engine that was left running to supply air to brakes. when they did that, brakes let lose. sounds like a "failure to communicate" with the train owners to me.
Sounds improbable to me.

Trains, like trucks use 'fail-safe' air brakes, the brakes are applied with the loss of air pressure.
Old 07-09-2013, 05:17 PM
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Firefighters fight fires, they don't operate trains. The train company is at fault and needs to change its protocols.
Old 07-09-2013, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by Crabpot Man View Post
Sounds improbable to me.

Trains, like trucks use 'fail-safe' air brakes, the brakes are applied with the loss of air pressure.
Truck parking brakes are spring loaded, air pressure holds the spring back till it is released. Trains have no such feature and air bleeding off can eventually release the brakes.
Old 07-09-2013, 06:17 PM
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There is so much we don't know.
Did the crew do it's job? Were enough hand brakes tied?
Is it some scab RR with poorly maintained equipment, poor training and poor oversight?
Were all but one engine shut down before the first fire leaving no air compressors online after the fireman reportedly shut one down?
Was the train tampered with?
There is usually a chain of events leading to disaster.
Old 07-09-2013, 07:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Crabpot Man View Post
Sounds improbable to me.

Trains, like trucks use 'fail-safe' air brakes, the brakes are applied with the loss of air pressure.

Old 07-09-2013, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Milehog View Post
Truck parking brakes are spring loaded, air pressure holds the spring back till it is released. Trains have no such feature and air bleeding off can eventually release the brakes.
When you drop the air pressure it applies the brakes. The piston is spring loaded. The freight cars are set for around 70lbs of pressure.All the engine does is supply air to a resivour that's mounted on the freight car When it drops by 3 lbs the brakes start applying.At around 50 lbs of pressure reduction or so the car goes into emergency and sets the brakes totally.
About the only way for this to happen is someone (kids most likely) released the brake handle in the cab. Had the crew set the handbrake on the engine this probably wouldn't have happened.
If the train was setting for a crew change i would think that in 7 miles there would be a switch that could have been thrown from the dispatcher controlling the traffic and have it derail long before it gets into a town
Old 07-09-2013, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Thalasso View Post
When you drop the air pressure it applies the brakes. The piston is spring loaded. The freight cars are set for around 70lbs of pressure.All the engine does is supply air to a resivour that's mounted on the freight car When it drops by 3 lbs the brakes start applying.At around 50 lbs of pressure reduction or so the car goes into emergency and sets the brakes totally.
About the only way for this to happen is someone (kids most likely) released the brake handle in the cab. Had the crew set the handbrake on the engine this probably wouldn't have happened.
If the train was setting for a crew change i would think that in 7 miles there would be a switch that could have been thrown from the dispatcher controlling the traffic and have it derail long before it gets into a town
Freight cars have a 90 lb train line. It's a lot of variables as to how this happened, the crew may not have tied the handbrakes, air brakes releasing, who knows. I will say this, because I have experienced this, if cars are left standing for a long time without a fully charged train line, it will take a long time for the locomotives to fully charge the system. If the system is not fully charged and the locomotives shut down, the air will bleed off of the cars very quickly. Also when you apply the brakes/make a reduction in air, air is taken from the train line and sent to the brake cylinder. Each car has its own brake system, main and auxiliary reservoirs, the brake cylinder and rigging. It only takes a one pound increase in pressure to release the brakes, pretty scary huh? Some locomotives have automatic fuel saver shutdown features. When the air pressure drops below a certain level or battery levels start to drop, the locomotives will start back. A sudden loss of power is taken away from everything in order to start the Diesel engine. When the power is restored, there sometimes is surge of power that can cause the air brakes on the controlling locomotive to rise 1-2 pounds which will release the brakes on the train. The only sure fire way of making sure a train doesn't move when left unattended is to apply a sufficient number of handbrakes.
Old 07-09-2013, 08:02 PM
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What he said. Other seemingly insignificant events can also initiate pressure waves in the trainline which can release the brakes.

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