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Plumbing help

Old 06-30-2013, 04:39 PM
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Default Plumbing help

Came down from the shower tonight to the kitchen sink was clogged, nothing would get it unclogged so I grabbed my little hand held compressor and a piece of ice maker hose and pushed the hose down in the drain and blew some air in there.

My son says "Daddy there is water all over the floor", on the other side of where the sink is the back side. Oh sh!t, anyway I tried snaking from the front of the drain line but couldn't down far enough so I cut the sheet rock behind the sink, and discovered there is no sluter air vent? they had just stove piped a piece of pvc about 10 inches up from the main connection on the drain line from the sink just an open piece of pvc? I guess when I blew air in there it blew water out of the top of the open pvc.

So my question is should I put a air vent on there, which I assume I should and am I going to need a vent on the wall for it, I can't close it up in the wall? Any other advice is appreciated as obviously I am not a plumber!!!
Old 06-30-2013, 04:51 PM
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You should have a "clean-out" under the sink that you can open and snake through.
It will be an angled pipe with a threaded cap under the sink coming up alongside the main drain pipe. If not, call a plumber.
Old 06-30-2013, 04:57 PM
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Someone cut costs. Yes, it needs a studer valve. Prevents the trap from draining completely. Do you have enough room to mount it so that it sits above the "high tide" line in your sink?
Old 06-30-2013, 04:58 PM
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Originally Posted by bellsisland View Post
I cut the sheet rock behind the sink, and discovered there is no sluter air vent? they had just stove piped a piece of pvc about 10 inches up from the main connection on the drain line from the sink just an open piece of pvc?
Sluter was a 14th century Dutch sculptor. I think you mean studor. These are air admittance valves (AAV).

If there is a vent stack in the wall that ties into the main plumbing vent exiting through the roof, then you should be tied into that vent.

If for some reason there is no proper vent located adjacent to your sink, it's acceptable to install air admittance valve in the cabinet under the sink. Make sure it's located a minimum of four inches above the horizontal branch drain or fixture being vented.

Tipsy
Old 06-30-2013, 05:19 PM
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Not sure what you mean by high tide line? I have enough room under sink to get it about 3-4 inches from the bottom of the sink?



Originally Posted by skibum View Post
Someone cut costs. Yes, it needs a studer valve. Prevents the trap from draining completely. Do you have enough room to mount it so that it sits above the "high tide" line in your sink?
Old 06-30-2013, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by bellsisland View Post
Not sure what you mean by high tide line? I have enough room under sink to get it about 3-4 inches from the bottom of the sink?
There are plenty of diagrams available.

Tipsy
Old 06-30-2013, 05:27 PM
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thanks tipsy
Old 06-30-2013, 07:53 PM
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Sorry for being unclear - I mean the top of the studer should be above the highest level water can be in your sink to prevent any flooding if the drain clogs.
Old 06-30-2013, 07:55 PM
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Studor vents can be enclosed in a wall. But yes they need to be above all the plumbing.
Old 07-01-2013, 05:05 AM
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Scarey. We use Studors all the time, but usually have them under the sink base where they are accessible.

BTW, you'll probably want to change out that radiator hose on the drain........................
Old 07-01-2013, 05:10 AM
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thanks bill, just another wild adventure at the house of pain!
Old 07-01-2013, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by bellsisland View Post
Not sure what you mean by high tide line? I have enough room under sink to get it about 3-4 inches from the bottom of the sink?
The valve should be a minimum of 4" above the trap weir but does NOT have to be mounted above the rim height of the sink and CAN be located in the vanity or sink cabinet. It must also be accessible.

I assume it is preferable to be higher and mine for my tub (which is not a sink so the exception may not apply) and double vanity in my master is higher BUT my sons bath vanity sink, the first floor 1/2 bath sink and a kitchen sink are all lower than the flood line.

You can also keep it in the wall, but should have an access panel.
Old 07-01-2013, 07:52 PM
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Originally Posted by TipsyMcStagger View Post
Sluter was a 14th century Dutch sculptor. I think you mean studor. These are air admittance valves (AAV).

If there is a vent stack in the wall that ties into the main plumbing vent exiting through the roof, then you should be tied into that vent.

If for some reason there is no proper vent located adjacent to your sink, it's acceptable to install air admittance valve in the cabinet under the sink. Make sure it's located a minimum of four inches above the horizontal branch drain or fixture being vented.

Tipsy
This guy is obviously a plumber.

This, X 2 !!
Old 07-01-2013, 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Still Stoked View Post
This guy is obviously a plumber.

This, X 2 !!
Thanks for the compliment, but not a plumber. I had to get educated three years ago when I gut renovated my kitchen and discovered the kitchen sink was never properly vented when the house was originally constructed.

Glad to be able to pay forward what I learned.

Tipsy

P.S. - I used to be a Flight Engineer on the Boeing 727. We were often referred to as "plumbers." Does that count?
Old 07-02-2013, 06:30 AM
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called in a pro yesterday, I am too busy with work. hated paying for something I could do, but it sure felt good to not be contorted under the sink hooking all that stuff up.

Thanks for the advice.
Old 07-02-2013, 08:24 AM
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So did the plumber have plumber's crack?
Old 07-02-2013, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by TipsyMcStagger View Post
Thanks for the compliment, but not a plumber. I had to get educated three years ago when I gut renovated my kitchen and discovered the kitchen sink was never properly vented when the house was originally constructed.

Glad to be able to pay forward what I learned.

Tipsy

P.S. - I used to be a Flight Engineer on the Boeing 727. We were often referred to as "plumbers." Does that count?
Tipsy, I too was an FE on B727s, also MC-130 and KC-10A. I'll be glad to compliment you with the term "Plumber".

Bert
Clearwater
Old 07-02-2013, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by BSL View Post
Tipsy, I too was an FE on B727s, also MC-130 and KC-10A. I'll be glad to compliment you with the term "Plumber".

Bert
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