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Attaching shed roof to existing house roof...

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Attaching shed roof to existing house roof...

Old 05-14-2013, 03:57 PM
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Default Attaching shed roof to existing house roof...

Got a shed roofing question for the THT experts.

My house has a flat cement tile roof. It is 50 years old but in absolutely perfect condition, so I don't want to mess with it.

On one side of the house, I have a "homemade" 5x10 wooden shed (probably 30 years old) that is due for repair/rebuilding. The shed is basically 3 wood walls tacked onto the concrete side wall of the house. Whoever built the shed didn't want to tackle the roof problem, so they instead stuck it under the eve of the house - so the shed currently is approx a foot shorter than the house itself, which creates some issues with space and the door into the shed is a couple inches shorter than standard.

I would prefer to have some way of making the shed roof approx the same height, without screwing with the existing roof... Is there some secret trick here or is this just impossible and I should do what the previous builder did?

Any way I look at it everything seems like a halfassed answer. Hoping someone might have a more creative solution or some way of looking at this that I'm not. If I rebuild the shed freestanding with its own completely separate roof, water is going to pour down into the space between the shed and the house, which is no good.

Long term, when the house is due for a new roof, I expect to add on a real block addition in this spot. This is a solution for 2-6 years at worst, but right now the shed itself is getting...mushy. LOL

Crappy diagram:
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Last edited by Flot; 05-14-2013 at 04:29 PM.
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:26 PM
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Your drawings are fine!

Deleting my first response after reading you have cement shingles...

Gutter the house and make the shed free-standing, with a shed roof away from the house!

I have no idea if you could adaquately seal a new roof tied into the existing house wall... never dealt with that situation personally...
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:49 PM
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Throw a tarp over it for 2-6 years until the whole roof needs redone - then do it right.

If it's just a shed, get it off the house. Use gutters to control the water.
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Old 05-14-2013, 04:53 PM
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Picture could help. Agree that continuing the existing slope of the main roof over the shed would look best but you'll need to 'tooth' the new shingles into the existing no way around it, but not that big a deal.
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Old 05-14-2013, 05:46 PM
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This is what the roof is - flat cement tiles painted with goop - the tiles are basically 1" thick bricks, there's no disturbing them without basically ruining the roof.

http://acrylux.com/roof-mastic/

Don't laugh, like I said - 50 years old and in perfect shape inside and out. This is a fairly common roof material down here, I know you guys up north will think its insane.

I could get really crazy and build a shed roof that nestled under the existing, then went up a foot to imitate the slope.... But now I'm getting into a major major project and wind driven rain would never dry out...

I could put a "flat"(er) roof on the shed and might be able to clear a standard door... Gutters to do what I can about the existing house runoff... What would be the least slope I could use with a particular roof type? I am open to suggestions for roof material...I could go metal?
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:30 PM
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Remove the facia and replace with 2x6 securely fastened to roof trusses, then support the facia with the side walls where the two intersect...done....bend some tin into an L shape and slip it up under the drip edge and down onto the shed roof....make sense?....
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Old 05-14-2013, 06:30 PM
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Do pic #1 ....... Get a gutter guy to fit a strip of flat gutter aluminum to the fascia board and the shed's roof.
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Old 05-14-2013, 07:09 PM
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I recently completed an 8' x 7' lean-to against my concrete block home. I considered extending the roof line but for simplicities sake, I simply flashed the roof to the side of the house.

It's not quite completed in these photos but you'll get the idea. I suppose this is similar to what you already have and are looking to get away from, but thought I'd share.

Tipsy



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Old 05-14-2013, 07:56 PM
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Originally Posted by slickster View Post
Remove the facia and replace with 2x6 securely fastened to roof trusses, then support the facia with the side walls where the two intersect...done....bend some tin into an L shape and slip it up under the drip edge and down onto the shed roof....make sense?....
Wait, actually, that does make sense. Make a solid drip edge out of aluminum, from the original drip edge down onto the new finished roof... so it would be a "stepped" roof but the step would have an all-metal transition from the old roof material to the new roof material...?

I think I could make that work... I could definitely prevent water from blowing up towards the house side that way... however, I couldn't be positive water wouldn't work its way under the shed side, as the shed roof material would butt up against the "new" fascia... but...that could work.

Tipsy that's almost exactly what I have now. You're obviously losing a lot of space too - and looks like the floor level in your shed might be substantially lower than that of your patio? Just curious, is that block or wood framed under the stucco?
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Old 05-14-2013, 08:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Flot View Post
Tipsy that's almost exactly what I have now. You're obviously losing a lot of space too - and looks like the floor level in your shed might be substantially lower than that of your patio? Just curious, is that block or wood framed under the stucco?
The threshold of the door (obviously) is the floor level of the lean-to. The lean-to slab is 6" above grade and is ridiculously overbuilt. It's what the engineer spec'd, so it's what had to be built. The structure is pressure treated framing with pressure treated plywood. It's all 2"x4" except for the rafters, which are 2"x6".

Yes, I lose some space by not have the roof line from the house carry down over the lean-to. But doing it this way significantly simplified the construction and mitigated other code requirements.

Tipsy



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