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Please don't move this downstairs...at least until everyone has seen it...

Old 03-15-2013, 05:47 AM
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Default Please don't move this downstairs...at least until everyone has seen it...

Received in an email. Hopefully you received it also.
I think it has been around for some time now.
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I challenge you to read this and have the will to pass it on.

No one has been able to explain to me why young men and women serve in the U.S. Military for 20 years, risking their lives protecting freedom, and only get 50% of their pay on retirement, while Politicians hold their positions in the safe confines of the capital, protected by these same men and women, and receive full-pay retirement after serving one term.
It just does not make any sense.

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EDIT:I am being told the above statement in BOLD is not true.
I found the following but I am not 100% it is true either, after all, it came from the internet.
I am sorry for any misleading information. Lesson learned.

-----------------

Summary
Prior to 1984, neither federal civil service employees nor Members of Congress paid Social
Security taxes, nor were they eligible for Social Security benefits. Members of Congress and
other federal employees were instead covered by a separate pension plan called the Civil Service
Retirement System (CSRS). The 1983 amendments to the Social Security Act (P.L. 98-21)
required federal employees first hired after 1983 to participate in Social Security. These
amendments also required all Members of Congress to participate in Social Security as of January
1, 1984, regardless of when they first entered
Congress. Because CSRS was not designed to
coordinate with Social Security, Congress directed
the development of a new retirement plan for
federal workers. The result was the Federal Employees’ Retirement System Act of 1986 (P.L. 99-
335).
Members of Congress first elected in 1984 or later are covered automatically under the Federal
Employees’ Retirement System (FERS). All Senators and those Representatives serving as
Members prior to September 30, 2003, may decline this coverage. Representatives entering office
on or after September 30, 2003, cannot elect to be excluded from such coverage. Members who
were already in Congress when Social Security cove
rage went into effect could either remain in
CSRS or change their coverage to FERS. Members are now covered under one of four different
retirement arrangements:


CSRS and Social Security;


The “CSRS Offset” plan, which includes both CSRS and Social Security, but
with CSRS contributions and benefits reduced by Social Security contributions
and benefits;


FERS and Social Security; or


Social Security alone.
Congressional pensions, like those of other federal employees, are financed through a
combination of employee and employer contributio
ns. All Members pay Social Security payroll
taxes equal to 6.2% of the Social Security taxable wage base ($113,700 in 2013). Members
enrolled in FERS and elected prior to 2013 also pay 1.3% of full salary to the Civil Service
Retirement and Disability Fund (CSRDF). Me
mbers of Congress first elected after 2012 and
enrolled in FERS contribute 3.1% of pay to the
CSRDF in addition to their Social Security
contributions. In 2013, Members covered by CSRS Offset pay 1.8% of the first $113,700 of
salary, and 8.0% of salary above this amount, into the CSRDF.
Under both CSRS and FERS, Members of Congress
are eligible for a pension at the age of 62 if
they have completed at least five years of service. Members are eligible for a pension at age 50 if
they have completed 20 years of service, or at any age after completing 25 years of service. The
amount of the pension depends on years of service and the average of the highest three years of
salary. By law, the starting amount of a Member’s retirement annuity may not exceed 80% of his
or her final salary.
As of October 1, 2011, 495 retired Members of Congress were receiving federal pensions based
fully or in part on their congressional service. Of this number, 280 had retired under CSRS and
were receiving an average annual pension of $70,620. A total of 215 Members had retired with
service under FERS and were receiving an average annual pension of $39,576 in 2011.

Please refer to the link for the other 18 pages.
http://www.senate.gov/CRSReports/crs...22%40%20%20%0A


More info:
http://answers.google.com/answers/th...id/604327.html

Rules, regs, guidelines, laws, etc...may/could vary for multiple reasons for state and federal and from state to state.

Please research my research and do not take anything posted as fact.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

If each person who receives this will forward it on to 20 people, in three days,
most people in the United States of America will have the message.
This is one proposal that really should be passed around.

Proposed 28th Amendment to the United States Constitution:
"Congress shall make no law that applies to the citizens of the United States that does not apply equally to the Senators and/or Representatives; and, Congress shall make no law that applies to the Senators and/or Representatives that does not apply equally to the citizens of the United States."

You are one of my 20 Plus.
I passed it on, will you?

"If you choose not to decide, you still have made a choice,"
and these brave soldiers have given you that right!


--------------

Another thing. I have always felt if a member of our armed forces was injured, dismembered, harmed while serving, they should be taken care of the rest of their lives some how, some way. I know there would be a lot of fraud, i.e. some PDSD, but what we have now just isn't right.

I also do not understand nor agree with once a position has been held, be it Mayor, Governor, Congressman/woman, Speaker, VP or POTUS, etc...., why are they always referred to as if they are still in the latest highest position held?
Please do not say it is out of "respect" for them having "served", that's BS!



.
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Last edited by 240 LTS; 03-15-2013 at 05:55 PM.
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Old 03-15-2013, 05:48 AM
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Forwarded!
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Old 03-15-2013, 05:54 AM
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Of course this will end up in the bilge, because someone will make it political, make it about sides and use it to trash (fill in the blank).

Before that happens, lets consider that a law forcing politicians to live by the same rules as the citizens might help us cleanse the garbage from both parties. Might actually attract folks to public office for the right reason.

Imagine what might happen if politicians had to actually occupy the space they created? Every law they passed would actually be the law under which they lived? Crazy I know.


Not sure I have as much an issue with what we call folks, but I can see how keeping the titles might have the feel of royalty. Have to give that one some thought.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:00 AM
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Its 50% of base pay too, not BAH or BAS. Many people retire as E-5's and E-6's and wind up with $1800 pre-tax a month for their pension.

Last edited by atcfris; 03-15-2013 at 09:09 AM.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:13 AM
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One can go into public office, lay low, go along to get along, get out, write a book, be on talk radio, Sunday morning shows and be set for life.
Not a bad gig. Maybe we are the stupid ones.



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Old 03-15-2013, 06:15 AM
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done
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:29 AM
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I like it. Forwarded on to my contact list.

Perhaps off topic a little, but I have a question about service men and women who are permanantly disabled from combat duty. I sold my previous home to a Vietnam veteran who was blinded by an exploding claymore. My real estate agent told me that he does not have to pay any taxes, property or otherwise because he was disabled while serving in a war. Is this true?
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by 240 LTS View Post
One can go into public office, lay low, go along to get along, get out, write a book, be on talk radio, Sunday morning shows and be set for life.
Not a bad gig. Maybe we are the stupid ones.

.
There are so many examples of this it's ridiculous. Your analysis wouldn't be complete without mentioning the revolving door with lobbying groups and govt subcontractors, especially the military-industrial wing. That entire grift is an industry unto itself.

Regardless of party, they all do it. They can't really help it.
Wall St and the petro/military-industrial complex rules DC.

And now, with the Citizens United ruling, and ever softer campaign finance regs-
so much gray money is washing around our elections that everyone is affected.

And not in a good way.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:37 AM
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Right now, they are trying to change military retirement from 20 years to 25 years! I don't have a link, but I just heard it on the radio.

I agree, our politicians (all of them) have forgotten who they work for and place themselves above the rest of us.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:37 AM
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I am retired USAF and yes it makes me mad to see what they get for retirement. I don't think while they are in that position they are asked to sit in a foxhole, wear chem suits in ungodly hot weather, live in places most people would not want to live, be separated from their families for long periods of time. Granted it was my choice to serve for 21 yrs and do not regret it, but for the little time they serve it's not fair.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Because Boat View Post
I like it. Forwarded on to my contact list.

Perhaps off topic a little, but I have a question about service men and women who are permanantly disabled from combat duty. I sold my previous home to a Vietnam veteran who was blinded by an exploding claymore. My real estate agent told me that he does not have to pay any taxes, property or otherwise because he was disabled while serving in a war. Is this true?
I believe that it's state specific, and it's also dependent on the percentage you are awarded, needing 100% in order for those benefits to apply.
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Old 03-15-2013, 06:46 AM
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It's a disgrace to know that a politician should make 100% while that brave Marine in the pic above has to live on what the government gives him. I will pass it on, but can't see some greedy politician giving up his money for some poor soul who gave it his all and has to spend the rest of his life trying to recover from what the politician sent him into!
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Because Boat View Post
I like it. Forwarded on to my contact list.

Perhaps off topic a little, but I have a question about service men and women who are permanantly disabled from combat duty. I sold my previous home to a Vietnam veteran who was blinded by an exploding claymore. My real estate agent told me that he does not have to pay any taxes, property or otherwise because he was disabled while serving in a war. Is this true?
In Texas we have an exemption called Disable Vet 100% unemployable or aka DVX. They pay no property taxes so long as they can prove they are unable to work.
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:23 AM
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Yep, IED's do not do nice thing to a body. I now work on base and see guys all the time missing limbs and pieces of their body, most people dont' see these thing and go on with their lives pretending it's a happy go lucky world out there.
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Old 03-15-2013, 07:29 AM
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Originally Posted by swifty View Post
In Texas we have an exemption called Disable Vet 100% unemployable or aka DVX. They pay no property taxes so long as they can prove they are unable to work.
Unable to work but must be awarded 100% Disability by the VA, right? I know a retired Army 1st SGT who is 100% disabled, non-combat serving, and now is a Federal civilian employee. He draws military retirement, 100% disability, and makes GS-12 pay, and has the benefits of the 100% rating, like DMV vehicle taxes waiver and plates, property tax waiver, handicap parking, and so on. Interesting how these things apply, how they are rated, and how some are on 100% and pushed pencils for their career.

The VA disability system is interesting. In my home state, I have a Combat Veteran plate on my car issued by the DMV for combat service, expeditionary medal recipient, and VA awarded disability, although not 100%. In my current state, unless you are 100%, you receive no benefit from the state, only the VA.

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Old 03-15-2013, 07:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Pcfisher66 View Post
Yep, IED's do not do nice thing to a body. I now work on base and see guys all the time missing limbs and pieces of their body, most people dont' see these thing and go on with their lives pretending it's a happy go lucky world out there.
This^^^^. I drive by a guy on the way to work almost every morning who is fishing, he had both his legs blown off in Iraq, and he is usually there with a buddy or two who are also dismembered from the war.

On a side note, I was traveling through IAH last year and there was a female corrections officer transporting and unruly prison passenger. She lost control of the prisoner in the parking lot on the way to the transport vehicle, and she was alone. I was with a buddy of mine who is an officer in the CG. Both him and I immediately provided assistance to her and helped subdue the prisoner (we are both Gracie Jiu Jitsu practitioners for the last 8 years and prior Navy wrestlers). When the security arrived to assist, as the arriving guard was lifting the prisoner into the vehicle, his pants legs pulled up, he had prosthetics on both legs. After it was said and done we talked to him for a few minutes as veterans, and he explained how his legs were blown off in Iraq, and after 2 years of recovery and rehabilitation he was now working security for IAH airport. Cool guy, and a big strong guy too. You never would have known it if his pants didn’t ride up.

You never know who you are going to come in contact with, or where they have been...
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:13 AM
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It's on FB as well...I copied it and passed it along.
It's a well-known fact that our elected officials are only in the game for themselves. I had an eye-opening conversation with a good friend who was also a lobbyist for the rights for victims of domestic abuse. She spent the last 10 years working at the state level to strengthen laws regarding domestic violence. According to what she told me, our elected officials will not do anything to truly represent the best interests of the majority of their constituency. All they want to do is pass laws that represent their and those who back them financially interests. The only time they will truly listen is if the voting block rises up and makes themselves heard...and heard so loudly they cannot ignore them. Most politicians are interested only in the next election...they will do and say whatever they can to get another term. Once ensconced in their office, they pad their crony's pockets(along with their own), and work to pass legislative action that enable them to stay firmly in office.
This attitude crosses party lines...Democrat, Repubican, Libertarian, and Independent...they all are guilty.
Until we demand term limits(two terms max for ANY elected office), this will remain as the status quo.
It's up to us. Make yourself heard.
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:16 AM
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Just so everyone is clear, the part about Congress getting full pay is wrong. Their pension system is much like any other, where years of service matters, age matters, and oh, it can never eclipse 80% of their last FTE paycheck.

I agree with everyone's beef about shafting our soldiers, but arguing over fallacies is precisely how nothing ever gets changed. The single greatest threat to our nation is the uninformed voter. An uninformed voter is not simply someone who disagrees with you. An uniformed voter willfully sends inaccurate information they got in a chain email, or read on the interweb, but did no diligence to verify its accuracy before sending it.

The best weapon against our leaders is accurate information. If every voter were informed, it would force our leadership to become accountable. Emails like this one are the single best weapon the government has against its people. Get everyone riled up over falsehoods so they are arguing away while they get fleeced of their rights.

Diligence doesn't hurt folks, and in this day and age, usually takes less time than it does to forward an email to 20 friends.
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Old 03-15-2013, 08:37 AM
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^^^^^^^^^^^

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Old 03-15-2013, 08:49 AM
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Originally Posted by atcfris View Post
Unable to work but must be awarded 100% Disability by the VA, right? I know a retired Army 1st SGT who is 100% disabled, non-combat serving, and now is a Federal civilian employee. He draws military retirement, 100% disability, and makes GS-12 pay, and has the benefits of the 100% rating, like DMV vehicle taxes waiver and plates, property tax waiver, handicap parking, and so on. Interesting how these things apply, how they are rated, and how some are on 100% and pushed pencils for their career.

The VA disability system is interesting. In my home state, I have a Combat Wounded Veteran plate on my car issued by the DMV for combat service, expeditionary medal recipient, and VA awarded disability, although not 100%. In my current state, unless you are 100%, you receive no benefit from the state, only the VA.

You are correct.
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