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Bathroom........

Old 01-07-2013, 09:24 AM
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Default Bathroom........

remodels SUCK!!!!! Starting tearing into one of the bathrooms last wednesday after work. My house is on a slab with 2x4 framing on top of that and then plywood, built in '64. Had to tear the floor out to the slab and I still need to put the self leveler on it. No ryhme or reason to stud layout and I don't believe they had levels back then either. Lots of wood rotted out and replaced with pressure treated. Entire house has a layer of 1/4" drywall with 1/2" of cement and expanded metal on top of it. What fun that is taking out. My God the dust involved. Comes out easy with a Metabo and a diamond blade. When they put the tile in they built it out 1 1/2" from the wall. Nice 3'x3' section weighed in around 110 lbs.
PLUMBING!!!!! Yeah baby. Now...... I can solder with the best of them, but for this project, I went with Shark Bite fittings. I could kiss the SOB that invented these!!!! Fantastic. Quick and easy. Since I torn out the three valve manifold and replaced it with a single handle, they came in handy. However........... I installed an American Standard valve in and proceeded to put the HardieBacker in. Everything capped so as to not get crap in it. HUGE mistake. After we got done boarding the walls on saturday I took the caps off the spigot and shower neck and wouldn't you know it...... It was dripping. Sent the wife back to Home Depot to get another and replace the diverter valve, but left the body in the wall. Guess what. That one leaked too. Tore into the wall (love the roto zip) and pulled the body and replaced it. Yep, that one leaked too. Tore it out yet again and returned all the American Standard crap (had to buy matching faucets and such) and replaced it with Moen. AS had female threads, Moen has male........but hey! Quick change of the Shark Bite fittings and we're back in business baby, and imagine that, this one don't drip. Did I mention how much I love Shark bite fittings? So, here I sit waiting for the second coat of mud to dry. Hope to have everything done by the weekend so I can get to fishing (now that we have ice).
I feel much better now.
Lord I hate remodels!
Old 01-07-2013, 09:30 AM
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I'm worn out just reading your post.
Old 01-07-2013, 10:11 AM
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I'm in construction and I can definitely say that it almost always pays to hire out the plumbing and electrical. Yes it can be done yourself, but plumbing usualy seems to require 10-15 trips to Home Depot for various parts (which never seem to fit together right) and the electical work which just needs to be done right.
Old 01-07-2013, 10:22 AM
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john bridge tile forum
Old 01-07-2013, 10:33 AM
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I have a rental next door that I hadn't stepped inside of in years. The tenant left while I was away last summer and I came home to 6 trunk loads of crap, the power off and months old food in a frig and it was 90 degrees. I cleaned up allot, but then waited till cooler weather.

Two months ago, I decided to "spruce up" the bath. The old double hung window had a broken pain, so I figured I'd do a replacement. The toilet was nasty, so I figured I'd get one of those $99 toilets. While working on it, I realized the floor was a little spongy (wish I hadn't).

So far, I removed the wall separating the kitchen and bath. Removed the floor and sub-floor in the kit and bath. Used (34) 2X6X16' PT to sister the floor joist's. Built a new wall/partition in a different spot to give more room in the bath. Removed a truck load of plaster. Removed the old toilet, tub, vanity, the kitchen cabinets are gone, as well as all the house plumbing and wiring. Two outside walls had rot, one ended up with new studs, both have new sheathing and insulation (siding in the future). The floors are now 3/4" Advantech. Busted a new hatchway into the crawlspace (to be framed).

Starting to put it back together. Rough-in is done and the new one piece tub is hooked up. Need to decide on the type of radiant floor heat I'll be using before installing the Durock in the bath and kitchen. Then sheetrock, floor tile, complete new kitchen, trim, paint, etc.. Of course there's the bedroom and Liv rm to look at, the rest of the windows, needs new front and rear doors and siding.

Did I mention it's a duplex?

Also, there rot in the roof deck....................

BTW, I have to do a major remodel and addition to my house starting soon.

and my GF thinks I spend too much time on the computer.
Old 01-07-2013, 12:12 PM
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Now you know why I got out of the plumbing business...

If you want some real fun, come to Massachusetts and remodel a bathroom that was built at the turn of the 20th century. Lots of concrete and razor-sharp wire mesh backing to keep things interesting. Oh, did I mention the lead piping?
Old 01-07-2013, 02:07 PM
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I feel your pain on the remodeling of bathrooms. My house has 4.5 baths. We've successfully gutted out all of the old Daltile that was in three and a half of them. All had sheet rock, wire mesh, and concrete, then tile. I pulled all that crap out by myself while the wife was in school. We still haven't done the last bath yet. It's functional 100%. I think it's fine. Connected to a guest bedroom. We never use it at all. I think I have her convinced to let it stay like it is. Fingers crossed......
Old 01-07-2013, 02:59 PM
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Nothing about plumbing or electrical that is rocket science, and basic house wiring is as simple as it gets. I purchased a repo in December and am doing the work myself. Currently have the inside gutted down to the bare studs. Fortunately the house is structurally sound, brick on a slab, 3 bedroom, one & 1/2 bath. I am changing up the floor plan to a two bedroom, with a small office, greatly enlarging the master bedroom. It is not a big house, 1350 sqft, but I am on my own and not in a rush. I am going to stay where I am untill it is finished, then move in. I have remodeled one in the past while trying to live in it, and did not enjoy it. I am 60 so this will be my last move, new ceilings, floors, walls, fixtures, cabinets, appliances, doors, trim, every thing on the inside will be new, sitting on 27 acres, fenced, with two ponds and two barns. As I said I bought it as a repo, and made a hell of a deal. Right now the budget is looking like, between 100,000 and 105,000 completed. I grin every time I drive a nail. The work, however, is cutting into my boating time for the next couple of months.

Disclaimer: I was a general contractor in a former life.
Old 01-07-2013, 03:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Chuckster View Post
Now you know why I got out of the plumbing business...

Oh, did I mention the lead piping?
Really? I am about to redo one of my bathrooms that some of it went in I think sometime between 1920-1940! The house was built in 1880. How do I identify it as lead pipe?
Old 01-07-2013, 03:37 PM
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Plumbing DIY has a very great rule:

Go to Home Depot and buy 2 of everything you THINK you might need --- then just return what you didn't use. Yes, HD is overpriced compared to most supplies -- but this is one of the benefits.

Oh! And always keep a good supply of Sharkbites and the proper removal tool for them. They've bailed my ass out of a jam from time to time -- as much as I don't like them.
Old 01-07-2013, 05:08 PM
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Moen and kohler.

Bathrooms are always a PITA, even for us professionals. Friggin' tv shows make it look like a 1 day project. Owners don't have a clue, but suzy on tv plumbed the whole bathroom in 10 minutes while holding her poodle, so WHY is it taking so long? Labor intensive, dirty, heavy..

I hate bathroom remodels.
Old 01-07-2013, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
Moen and kohler.

Bathrooms are always a PITA, even for us professionals. Friggin' tv shows make it look like a 1 day project. Owners don't have a clue, but suzy on tv plumbed the whole bathroom in 10 minutes while holding her poodle, so WHY is it taking so long? Labor intensive, dirty, heavy..

I hate bathroom remodels.
If it's a simple gut -- it's easy (not having to move anything and plumbing is all in good shape -- it's a dream.

Start moving stuff around... ugh.
Old 01-07-2013, 05:15 PM
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I hate American Standard
Old 01-07-2013, 05:25 PM
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I did all the demo on both our 1963 bathrooms. The tile, wire mesh and concrete sucked. What a pain that was. I did all the grunt work and all I needed was a good tile guy to do the pan and tile work.
Old 01-07-2013, 06:08 PM
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I redid both of our bathrooms with the help of my father-in-law. On a scale of 1-10 I rated my work about a 6 for the upstairs and 4 for the downstairs. I wasn't very happy with either one but they looked better than they did.

The downstairs bathroom is basically my bathroom and the fiberglass shower cracked so we decided to have the whole thing redone. OMG did they do a fantastic job, way better than I could have ever done. New shower, new granite counter top, new cabinets, and even a new floor. Made the granite counter top that had 1 sink into a 2 sink counter top.

The best part is that the only thing I did was install the shower bars and the TP holder and of course wrote the check. The upstairs will get done in the next couple of years and I would not even consider doing it myself.

Russ
Old 01-08-2013, 03:36 PM
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Nothing about plumbing or electrical that is rocket science
After 18 years as a plumber in MA (which has one of the strictest plumbing codes in the nation, BTW), I worked in the plumbing department at HD at night while I worked on my degree. A man strolled in one night, cocky as all get-out and says "I'm gonna try building a new bathroom in my house... gimme everything I need." I tried to explain to him that there are a lot of factors - location, pipe sizing, fixture units, and especially venting. I continued that remodels are one thing, but new baths shouldn't be attempted by someone without some very real knowledge of building and plumbing codes.

Him: "I'm a goddamn surgeon... how hard can it be? It's not rocket science!"
Me: "Well, thank you for insulting my profession... everything you'll need will be in one of these five aisles. Good luck!"

Every time someone says that, my BP goes off the charts. Sorry for the thread drift - carry on.
Old 01-08-2013, 03:42 PM
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Originally Posted by 1rider View Post
Really? I am about to redo one of my bathrooms that some of it went in I think sometime between 1920-1940! The house was built in 1880. How do I identify it as lead pipe?
If they have never been updated, a house of that vintage will probably have course- or fine-thread brass water piping, which must be replaced with either one of the new PEX systems or old school copper. You may still have a lead main from the street. My house was built in '27 and still has a lead main from the street to the meter.

Also, you'll probably have lead bends under each toilet, which will probably break when you try to remove the toilet. This will happen on a long weekend when every supply house within a 100-mile radius is closed.

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