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Sealing pavers : best product advise needed

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Sealing pavers : best product advise needed

Old 07-19-2012, 08:32 PM
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Default Sealing pavers : best product advise needed

Anyone have a good product for sealing pavers? The company that installed them said to wait 30 days and recommended to buy it from them. The 30 days is almost up so I'm ready to seal. The other question is about the sand. Over the past 30 days much of the sand is no longer there. Should I put more sand in first?
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Old 07-19-2012, 08:38 PM
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Dont add sand. You only need the sand that remained. If you add more it will wash out. Give it a little more than 30 days. If you seal it to soon and they have not fully effervesced then the sealer will turn milky white. You can get a good sealer at HD or Lowe's
Acid wash it first and then let it dry for at least a day or so. Best way to acid wash is to get the watering bucket you would use in a garden with the multiple holes in the spout.
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Old 07-19-2012, 09:14 PM
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Get a good solvent based sealer. The water based ones from the home stores wont last long at all. Get a commercial product from your local supplier. Have one person spraying with a garden sprayer and a second back rolling it. Put ona couple coats.
I would wait awhile longer and you want it very dry when you apply it.
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:30 AM
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I never sealed mine around the pool and they look the same as when they were installed. The area never gets any deicing treatments in the winter as it is not used. Sealing will help protect against spill staining and can add a sheen, but IMO it is not needed from my experience. your use may differ.

No sand and you will have weeds and ultimately soil ending up in the joints. The soil builds up over time from dead leaves, dust in the air, etc. causing more weeds. Sand helps prevent this and stabalize the pavers. Regular sand should NOT be used IMO. Polymeric sand should be. After the pavers are laid, it shuld have been swept in, plat compacted, and swept in again. After a light watering to activate the additive in the sand and you end up with a nice grout look theat helps prevent weeds, ants and bugs. After a couple of years, you may need a small amunt for touch up. It hardens to a somewhat pliable finish and does prevent weeds and, in my case, ants. I never added any after teh first time and over time you do lose some. ants like the sandy soil underneath and in one area pavers caved in a bit due to the ants excavation. Use the polymeric sand.
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Old 07-20-2012, 04:09 AM
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Bought the good stuff at Rossini Marble Supply in Miami to seal my pool deck.

Many options, dont go cheap if you want it to last.
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Old 07-20-2012, 05:31 AM
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Cobble Coat is what my paver guy recomended
http://surfacelogix.net/product.aspx?id=2
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:18 AM
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Couldnt think of the name last night but I think Techniseal is what we have used.
http://www.techniseal.com/

We powerwash, resand, brush/hose the excess off, and seal.


I am not a big fan of the glossy wet look sealers but winder if they might last longer and lose some of the gloss after a short time?
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Old 07-20-2012, 02:58 PM
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Sherwin Williams has a very good oil based sealer ,I own a paver install company.
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:11 PM
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Originally Posted by BACKTOTHESEA View Post
I never sealed mine around the pool and they look the same as when they were installed. The area never gets any deicing treatments in the winter as it is not used. Sealing will help protect against spill staining and can add a sheen, but IMO it is not needed from my experience. your use may differ.

No sand and you will have weeds and ultimately soil ending up in the joints. The soil builds up over time from dead leaves, dust in the air, etc. causing more weeds. Sand helps prevent this and stabalize the pavers. Regular sand should NOT be used IMO. Polymeric sand should be. After the pavers are laid, it shuld have been swept in, plat compacted, and swept in again. After a light watering to activate the additive in the sand and you end up with a nice grout look theat helps prevent weeds, ants and bugs. After a couple of years, you may need a small amunt for touch up. It hardens to a somewhat pliable finish and does prevent weeds and, in my case, ants. I never added any after teh first time and over time you do lose some. ants like the sandy soil underneath and in one area pavers caved in a bit due to the ants excavation. Use the polymeric sand.
Agreed. Why seal them? I used play sand mixed with chocolate mortar. Filled them in when we first got through laying the pavers and then about every 2-3 weeks for a while. It stabilized the pavers and helps keep the weeds out. Will still occasionaly mix up some sand and mortar, sweep it in, and lightly water.
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Old 07-20-2012, 03:15 PM
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Mr. D. I like that and actually like the glossy look. I want to seal it and was hoping the sand might seal up with the sealer since this is uncovered (no screen) and the leaves/debris are already a pia. I wonder if the glossy is any more slippery.
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Old 07-20-2012, 06:47 PM
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Agree 100%. My first thought was .. why would someone want to seal pavers. They are exterior and a sealer will in the long term create an un-natural moisture barrier that will not allow regular vapor transmission.
Originally Posted by BACKTOTHESEA View Post
I never sealed mine around the pool and they look the same as when they were installed. The area never gets any deicing treatments in the winter as it is not used. Sealing will help protect against spill staining and can add a sheen, but IMO it is not needed from my experience. your use may differ.

No sand and you will have weeds and ultimately soil ending up in the joints. The soil builds up over time from dead leaves, dust in the air, etc. causing more weeds. Sand helps prevent this and stabalize the pavers. Regular sand should NOT be used IMO. Polymeric sand should be. After the pavers are laid, it shuld have been swept in, plat compacted, and swept in again. After a light watering to activate the additive in the sand and you end up with a nice grout look theat helps prevent weeds, ants and bugs. After a couple of years, you may need a small amunt for touch up. It hardens to a somewhat pliable finish and does prevent weeds and, in my case, ants. I never added any after teh first time and over time you do lose some. ants like the sandy soil underneath and in one area pavers caved in a bit due to the ants excavation. Use the polymeric sand.
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:33 PM
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Polymeric sand and Flagstone Pavor sealer (Some people dont seal at all). Flagstone is in Brooksville. They will say not to use a oil base as it can turn white. Ask them any questions you have, they are great with helping.

http://www.flagstonepavers.com/contact
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:37 PM
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You can also add a non skid to it I believe, ask them at Flagstone.
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:50 PM
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Originally Posted by 1MoreMinute View Post
Polymeric sand and Flagstone Pavor sealer (Some people dont seal at all). Flagstone is in Brooksville. They will say not to use a oil base as it can turn white. Ask them any questions you have, they are great with helping.

http://www.flagstonepavers.com/contact
Thank you, I'll check them out.
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Old 07-23-2012, 04:59 PM
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Your welcome. I take care of many rentals, and one owner wanted me to do this a while back and I told them I have never done it, she said you can do anything c'mon!, did my own research and made some calls and felt stupid that I even said that to them, easy as pie, but I'd rather take the time to ask before messing up someones elses pavers! Good luck, any questions feel free to PM me.

Please ask them about the oil base, now that I am doing it more, I have seen that white haze on the pavers from people using the oil based, not sure if they prepped it wrong or something with the FL conditions, but they will tell you why. With the info they told me and the product they told me to use, Ive never had any issues and I am in FL as well about 30 mins away from you. Good luck.
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:08 PM
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Having worked in the clay industry for my lifetime I worked very closely with the reference companys products. They provide excellent technical assistance and have quality products for various applications. I'm sure if you contact them or visit their website they will direct you to a dealer in your area. There are sealers that work well on clay and then others that work good for concrete. Other factors to consider is to make sure there is no moisture trapped in the product when sealing them. If so you will have issues later to deal with. I've seen many nice paving jobs turn out looking like crap due to improper sealing applications. Lot of fly by night individuals out there who claim to be expert at sealing or waterproffing products. Beware.
If concrete contact the National Concrete Association, if clay contact the Brick Institute of America for technical information.
Good luck, Post a photo and let us see the end results.

http://www.prosoco.com/About
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Old 07-23-2012, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Severance View Post
Having worked in the clay industry for my lifetime I worked very closely with the reference companys products. They provide excellent technical assistance and have quality products for various applications. I'm sure if you contact them or visit their website they will direct you to a dealer in your area. There are sealers that work well on clay and then others that work good for concrete. Other factors to consider is to make sure there is no moisture trapped in the product when sealing them. If so you will have issues later to deal with. I've seen many nice paving jobs turn out looking like crap due to improper sealing applications. Lot of fly by night individuals out there who claim to be expert at sealing or waterproffing products. Beware.
If concrete contact the National Concrete Association, if clay contact the Brick Institute of America for technical information.
Good luck, Post a photo and let us see the end results.

http://www.prosoco.com/About


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Old 07-24-2012, 12:50 PM
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We've sealed probably a million SF with cobble coat, it works great. One post receommended acid wash. This is a huge mistake unless you have some spot staining. Even so you need to have a professional do it. I have seen alot of screwed up sealer jobs, that will never look good again. Resand with paver sand (i.e. mason sand) then seal, your sealerr guy will probably only charge an extra $.05/SF to resand.
Originally Posted by Jus Teasin View Post
Cobble Coat is what my paver guy recomended
http://surfacelogix.net/product.aspx?id=2
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Old 07-24-2012, 02:51 PM
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Hire a pro, they know what to use.
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Old 06-25-2013, 06:27 PM
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I'd like to add a few things to this thread to help clarify some things about sealing pavers and make it as useful as possible.
Cleaning Pavers-
Using acids and other cleaners can either burn or discolor your pavers and be (really) bad news on some pavers- avoid it whenever possible. Skip the chemicals and rent commercial grade power washing equipment with 4000 PSI or more and 4 gallons per minute. Anything less doesn't really have the cleaning power on pavers. If you're going to use any kind of chemical, make sure to do it on a test area, don't leave it on very long, and make sure it's thoroughly rinsed.
Sand-
The reason the sand is between the joints is for stability of the paver, and it's settled height should be at 1/8" below the chamfor edge of the paver. When pavers are installed, the contractor generally sweeps dry sand into the joints and calls it done. As the sand gets wet, it settles down into into the joints and low spots in the base material, so you will need to add new sand by 'wet sanding' using a garden hose or pressure washer with a rinsing tip. Rinse to 1/8' below the edge of the paver, and leave no sand on the surface.
Sealers-
Do not use solvent or oil based sealers. These types of sealer are not a 'breathe-able' product and will trap moisture under the layer of sealer and can turn your entire driveway white, leaving it looking like a glazed doughnut and in need of stripping. (very bad news) Since 2008 or so, most professionals have switched exclusively to water based sealers, such as Seal n Lock brand sealers. They also offer a sealer called Super Wet, which has a urethane additive that will give you extra shine. This product is made in Tampa, Fl. and works excellent on brick pavers, concrete, rock waterfalls, and stacked stone and really brings out the colors of the paver. To the guy above who thinks his pavers haven't weathered or lost color- you have no idea what you're missing! I shock people daily with the before & after, and that's one of the reasons I love what I do.
Doing the work-
Sealing pavers is all about the prep work and attention to detail, (which is why you hire a professional with good equipment and a trained eye). If you have dirt, spots, sand, etc. the sealer will enhance the problem area and make it nearly impossible to remove. Take your time washing and sanding, then blow away any excess sand with a blower. Any sand left behind will be permanent after the 'flood coat' of sealer. A flood coat actually floods the paver joints and locks the sand in like grout. It permanently stabilizes the joint, prevents sand washout and weed growth, and soaks into the paver surface to enhance the color. The 2nd coat will use less sealer and sit on top of the paver more, bringing it more shine.
In closing, paver sealing can be something a homeowner can do themselves, but it requires the right equipment, the right product, and a willingness to do it properly. Paver are expensive to replace, and skimping on any of the above can ruin the look of your beautiful pavers. With the cost of renting proper power washing, sealing equipment, buying the sealer, and doing the labor-it's often more economical to hire a professional.
If you have any other questions about sealing pavers, decks, docks, etc. I'd be happy to help answer them for you. OK, enough shop talk for me- time to go fishin'!
-Steve
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