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Wine terms? I think its hype.

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Old 01-05-2012, 08:31 AM
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Default Wine terms? I think its hype.

Food and wine are in the news in my city, but I wonder about the hype level in wine terms. I looked on a definition of wine terms site, there must be a 100+
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FOXY (see also GRAPEY, VITIS LABRUSCA below).
Common descriptive word used to note the presence of the unique musky and grapey character attached to native american Vitis. labrusca grapes such as the Concord or Catawba varieties. Derived from the french phrase "gout de renard" which literally translates as "odour" or "taste" of fox, but means something more like "presence of fox" in the intangible sense. THE AROMA AND FLAVOR DEFY VERBAL DESCRIPTION. The best way to imprint "foxiness" in the memory is to mentally compare the flavours of fresh Concord grapes and any fresh California table grape. Most people find the juice or jelly from the Concord grape quite sprightly and delicious. In dry table wines that same flavour is considered obtrusive and even quite disagreeable.

Many seem really vague, but I am not educated in wine

and all the stuff about keep at a set temperature- my local grocery store (a big wine selection" says most wines come (in the 105 degree summer)- in a unairconditioned truck and probably are stored in an unairconditioned warehouse
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Old 01-05-2012, 08:41 AM
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Originally Posted by edwardh1 View Post
Food and wine are in the news in my city, but I wonder about the hype level in wine terms. I looked on a definition of wine terms site, there must be a 100+
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FOXY (see also GRAPEY, VITIS LABRUSCA below).
Common descriptive word used to note the presence of the unique musky and grapey character attached to native american Vitis. labrusca grapes such as the Concord or Catawba varieties. Derived from the french phrase "gout de renard" which literally translates as "odour" or "taste" of fox, but means something more like "presence of fox" in the intangible sense. THE AROMA AND FLAVOR DEFY VERBAL DESCRIPTION. The best way to imprint "foxiness" in the memory is to mentally compare the flavours of fresh Concord grapes and any fresh California table grape. Most people find the juice or jelly from the Concord grape quite sprightly and delicious. In dry table wines that same flavour is considered obtrusive and even quite disagreeable.

Many seem really vague, but I am not educated in wine

and all the stuff about keep at a set temperature- my local grocery store (a big wine selection" says most wines come (in the 105 degree summer)- in a unairconditioned truck and probably are stored in an unairconditioned warehouse
That is why I stopped buying wine from our local grocery. Too many skunked bottles. Of course, some of the cheaper wines it is hard to tell the difference anyhoo.
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by edwardh1 View Post
Food and wine are in the news in my city, but I wonder about the hype level in wine terms. I looked on a definition of wine terms site, there must be a 100+
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FOXY
I only use two terms when describing wine;

Good
Not Good.
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:19 AM
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Forget all of the BS descriptions and buy your wine from a wine merchant. Drink what you like. There is a lot of information on the back label of every bottle. I stick with mostly domestic and German whites. Table grapes are not used in wine making just as wine grapes are not table grade. Price does not guarantee a wine you may enjoy do not let the snob price BS influence you.
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by A Few Dollars View Post
I only use two terms when describing wine;

Good
Not Good.

Two more for you;

Open
Empty
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:24 AM
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I agree with previous poster, drink what you like and don't worry about whether it's "bouquet" is "fruity," "musky" or "earthy." "Tasty" is the only thing that matters. Here's my idea of a good bottle of wine to accompany a pasta dinner!
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by BSpot View Post
Two more for you;

Open
Empty
Empty would indicate good.
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by edwardh1 View Post
Food and wine are in the news in my city, but I wonder about the hype level in wine terms. I looked on a definition of wine terms site, there must be a 100+
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FOXY...

and all the stuff about keep at a set temperature- my local grocery store (a big wine selection" says most wines come (in the 105 degree summer)- in a unairconditioned truck and probably are stored in an unairconditioned warehouse
They are SELLING wine. They are trying to make it sound interesting. The variety is definitely there though. Find a grape you like. I like zinfandel. It's the American grape.

And the "room temperature" hype is funny too. Drink it how you like it.
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Old 01-05-2012, 10:29 AM
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I only know one thing about wine. Trader Joes $2.99¢ a bottle.
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Lyle29464 View Post
I only know one thing about wine. Trader Joes $2.99¢ a bottle.
3 buck chuck?
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Old 01-05-2012, 02:50 PM
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Never tasted a wine that with some ice and sprite, tasted just fine....
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Old 01-05-2012, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by edwardh1 View Post
Food and wine are in the news in my city, but I wonder about the hype level in wine terms. I looked on a definition of wine terms site, there must be a 100+
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brawny
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FOXY (see also GRAPEY, VITIS LABRUSCA below).
Common descriptive word used to note the presence of the unique musky and grapey character attached to native american Vitis. labrusca grapes such as the Concord or Catawba varieties. Derived from the french phrase "gout de renard" which literally translates as "odour" or "taste" of fox, but means something more like "presence of fox" in the intangible sense. THE AROMA AND FLAVOR DEFY VERBAL DESCRIPTION. The best way to imprint "foxiness" in the memory is to mentally compare the flavours of fresh Concord grapes and any fresh California table grape. Most people find the juice or jelly from the Concord grape quite sprightly and delicious. In dry table wines that same flavour is considered obtrusive and even quite disagreeable.

Many seem really vague, but I am not educated in wine

and all the stuff about keep at a set temperature- my local grocery store (a big wine selection" says most wines come (in the 105 degree summer)- in a unairconditioned truck and probably are stored in an unairconditioned warehouse
I can't say those are the typical words used to discribe wine around here.

Earthy , barn yard ,citris, acitic,musty, chalky. The wine has nice legs. window pains.

Chuck... box O.. are not good discriptions either
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Old 01-06-2012, 05:41 AM
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Get the wine with the screw top bottle, it's easy to open.

Rest of that stuff is for the artsy fartsy crow that has nothing better to do than pretend they are more educated than the plain folk.
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