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$736,000. for a single tuna..

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Old 01-04-2012, 10:23 PM
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Default $736,000. for a single tuna..

I have sold a lot of fish in my day but never a payday like this...this is amazing.

http://news.yahoo.com/single-tuna-fe...040041043.html
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:47 PM
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Hard to believe there arent more around.
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Old 01-04-2012, 10:59 PM
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The bigger the (tuna) fish, the higher the level of mercury. Most of the tuna I ate in Japan was farmed tuna. And even that was rarely eaten.
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Old 01-04-2012, 11:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Eyeball View Post
The bigger the (tuna) fish, the higher the level of mercury. Most of the tuna I ate in Japan was farmed tuna. And even that was rarely eaten.
Farmed Tuna is wild cought...I missed the point Other then you ate Tuna in Japan
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Old 01-04-2012, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by llord View Post
Farmed Tuna is wild caught...I missed the point Other then you ate Tuna in Japan
No. Farmed tuna is grown in floating nets. I'll try to find you some pix. Wild tuna has more mercury. I read the really big tuna caught in the Atlantic are shipped to Japan because of the concern if tested the mercury content would be too high to sell in the US.
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Old 01-05-2012, 04:52 AM
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Retirement plan in one cast.
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Old 01-05-2012, 05:40 AM
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Very cheap global advertising for his restaurant chain, a fantastic statement about commitment to quality and he still gets to sell the Tuna. Clever man.
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Old 01-05-2012, 05:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Eyeball View Post
No. Farmed tuna is grown in floating nets. I'll try to find you some pix. Wild tuna has more mercury. I read the really big tuna caught in the Atlantic are shipped to Japan because of the concern if tested the mercury content would be too high to sell in the US.
Every year the first tuna sale is celebrated with a huge price

Farm raised tuna were originally wild caught and then fattened up in the pens

Please show me your intel on the reason the American caught tuna go to Japan is due to high mercury. Last I knew it is because the Japanese paid the highest price for it.
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Old 01-05-2012, 05:53 AM
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^^^ Thanks^^^ And they all dont go to Japan,some stay here.If Mercury were a concern Groupers,Kings,nothing would be sold or consumed...BFT is very high in it tho
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Old 01-05-2012, 08:07 AM
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There was a show on Currents a few weeks ago talking about the farm raised tuna in Japan. There is one scientist that raised them from eggs...

http://articles.cnn.com/2010-01-20/t...ity?_s=PM:TECH
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Old 01-05-2012, 09:33 AM
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Only the best quality ABFT go over seas. The Japaneese demand the best quality, it is thier culture. Our domestic market gets the lesser quality fish because Americans do not demand or even know the differance for the most part.

This happens every year and has nothign to do with anything but this 1 fish.

Sounds good in the news thats it.
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Old 01-05-2012, 10:02 AM
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http://www.worldfishingtoday.com/new....asp?nyId=3387

Pretty interesting article....
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Old 01-05-2012, 03:31 PM
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Yeah I just saw this on the news, massive fish!
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Old 01-05-2012, 04:40 PM
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Originally Posted by DJWILLIAMS View Post

Read that article but I don't understand the last sentence, the part I underlined:

Last year, Greenpeace launched an advertising campaign likening bluefin to their critically endangered land counterparts.

I didn't know bluefin tuna had a "land counterpart", let alone that the counterpart was also endangered. Anyone know of any land fish?
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Old 01-05-2012, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Trayder View Post

Please show me your intel on the reason the American caught tuna go to Japan is due to high mercury. Last I knew it is because the Japanese paid the highest price for it.

I think it is pretty commonly accepted the bigger the fish, the long it has been around ingesting smaller fish and collecting their mercury.

Here you go, just one of many many many sources on the subject:

The U.S. limit is 1.0 ppm while Canada Health guidelines are 0.5 ppm. Studies have shown that the highest levels of mercury are found in sharks, swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel and large tuna. The tuna issue is a complicated one. There is research showing that some tunas such as bluefin can exceed the FDA limits.

That from Dr. Michael T. Morrissey, Director and Professor Oregon State University Seafood Lab - Astoria

http://www.chucksseafood.com/mercury.pdf

Sorry, I don't recall where I learned that large tuna were sent to Japan because if tested they could not be consume or sold. Could you image telling the Japanese,"hey, wanna buy this big tuna? We can't eat it, too much mercury, but you might like it." Fwiw, I also recall the tuna that is a concern is from the Atlantic.

You are correct about the Japanese willing to pay top dollar for fish. The last mega-tuna, a rarer black tune, was bought at auction by someone with a restaurant in China or Hong Kong ... someone not in Japan.
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Old 01-05-2012, 05:30 PM
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Japanese are the death nail for the species
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Old 01-06-2012, 04:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Eyeball View Post
I think it is pretty commonly accepted the bigger the fish, the long it has been around ingesting smaller fish and collecting their mercury.

Here you go, just one of many many many sources on the subject:

The U.S. limit is 1.0 ppm while Canada Health guidelines are 0.5 ppm. Studies have shown that the highest levels of mercury are found in sharks, swordfish, tilefish, king mackerel and large tuna. The tuna issue is a complicated one. There is research showing that some tunas such as bluefin can exceed the FDA limits.

That from Dr. Michael T. Morrissey, Director and Professor Oregon State University Seafood Lab - Astoria


http://www.chucksseafood.com/mercury.pdf



Sorry, I don't recall where I learned that large tuna were sent to Japan because if tested they could not be consume or sold. Could you image telling the Japanese,"hey, wanna buy this big tuna? We can't eat it, too much mercury, but you might like it." Fwiw, I also recall the tuna that is a concern is from the Atlantic.

You are correct about the Japanese willing to pay top dollar for fish. The last mega-tuna, a rarer black tune, was bought at auction by someone with a restaurant in China or Hong Kong ... someone not in Japan.
Not arguing mercury levels in larger fish

You stated bluefin went to Japan due to their mercury levels that is not correct

I
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by Trayder View Post
Not arguing mercury levels in larger fish

You stated bluefin went to Japan due to their mercury levels that is not correct

I

How do you know that is not correct?
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Eyeball View Post
How do you know that is not correct?
As you seem to know everything yet can't back up your own statement

It must be...

Tell me more about farm raised tuna, where do they originally come from before they are penned up?
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Old 01-06-2012, 07:26 AM
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check out the bunny clark site tim tower has it right
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