Notices

Basement flooring ?

Old 12-09-2011, 09:06 AM
  #1  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: 4 Seasons
Posts: 3,615
Received 680 Likes on 382 Posts
Default Basement flooring ?

When we moved in this house we carpeted the basement and covered up commercial glue down tile. There is the possibility of asbestos. After a pump failure the carpet got saturated and was removed. Im looking at different options for new flooring. About 50sq ft of the tile has been removed around the perimeter of the basement because it was loose and had moisture under it. All total were looking at about 500sq ft of flooring. My options so far are to patch in the area where the tiles were removed and install new vinyl over the top or tear it all out and install ceremic tile. Under the tiles that were removed there looks like there is a grey paint plus tile adhesive. In order to use ceramic tile I might have to rent a scarifier to clean the cement prior to tile. Anyone have any suggestions
Keep in mind its winter and I cant really ventilate the basement very well.
Any products out there I may have missed?
Old 12-09-2011, 09:33 AM
  #2  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Downeast, North Carolina
Posts: 6,132
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

Interlocking "tiles" would be good for a basement. http://www.rubberflooringinc.com/?gc...FQpS7AodtjNBSA

A floating floor is inexpensive and easily replaced.

Or, Google "basement flooring ideas".
Old 12-09-2011, 10:11 AM
  #3  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: 4 Seasons
Posts: 3,615
Received 680 Likes on 382 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by davedowneast View Post
Interlocking "tiles" would be good for a basement. http://www.rubberflooringinc.com/?gc...FQpS7AodtjNBSA

A floating floor is inexpensive and easily replaced.

Or, Google "basement flooring ideas".
Ive been looking at those but havent found anything I really like. This room will be a movie / workout room. 50" plasma is already mounted on the wall with surround sound speakers. I had every intention of installing ceramic but the mess involved has moved the vinyl to the forefront of my options. Im considering this 18x18 groutable vinyl


http://www.lowes.com/pd_258041-79508...ductId=3028894

Im still open to other options though. May take a little thinset today to see if it will bond to the cement
Old 12-09-2011, 12:25 PM
  #4  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Near Wheeling W.V.
Posts: 944
Received 574 Likes on 295 Posts
Default

I've installed Allure Trafficmaster (home depot?) in both our house and boat a few years ago. So far we've been pleased with it. It goes down fast without any gluing because it's free floating product. The only fault I've observed has been on the boat, when it gets "cold" the seams open up just a bit, but you shouldn't encounter the issue in your basement.

Last edited by Bamby; 12-09-2011 at 12:28 PM. Reason: spelling
Old 12-09-2011, 12:51 PM
  #5  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 4,290
Received 147 Likes on 56 Posts
Default

You can glue polypropylene carpet directly to the slab without a pad. It's mold proof, so shop vac and dehumidifier when/if it gets wet. There are some pretty thick and nice carpets that are *almost* as good without a pad as others are with. That's the route we went last month after we had THREE FEET of water in our basement during the flooding from tropical storm lee in september (from flash flood, not a pump failure).
Old 12-09-2011, 12:54 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Charlotte, NC
Posts: 6,452
Likes: 0
Received 416 Likes on 242 Posts
Default

If the room is going to be finished out fairly nicely then look into engineered hardwood flooring. It can be placed on a slab and isn't too expensive.
Old 12-09-2011, 01:12 PM
  #7  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 10,224
Likes: 0
Received 4 Likes on 4 Posts
Default

I'd think anykind of wood will have problems with moisture, but I may be wrong. I did my basement witha friend last year, about 600 sq. ft. neither of us had ever done tile work before but it came out great, it adds some class to the basement and looks beautiful, so good that after doing the floor we sheetrocked the walls and now we've got a greta party room! If the room is pretty square you won't need to make many cuts and you can bang it out in a couple of weekends without killing yourself.
Old 12-09-2011, 01:22 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: 4 Seasons
Posts: 3,615
Received 680 Likes on 382 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Bamby View Post
I've installed Allure Trafficmaster (home depot?) in both our house and boat a few years ago. So far we've been pleased with it. It goes down fast without any gluing because it's free floating product. The only fault I've observed has been on the boat, when it gets "cold" the seams open up just a bit, but you shouldn't encounter the issue in your basement.
I used Allure last year when I renovated my moms house. We had a little trouble keeping the butt joints tight, but overall the floor came out nice. I read a review about someone who used it over concrete and they mentioned a considerable amount of mold developed underneath it.
The walls in the basement are wood paneling so adding more wood would be overkill unless I painted the walls. Laminate flooring will soak up water like a sponge, engineered flooring is suppose to be better but not ideal.
Ill look into the polypropylene carpet

Last edited by Mine Now; 12-09-2011 at 06:54 PM.
Old 12-09-2011, 02:38 PM
  #9  
gf
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 13,401
Received 403 Likes on 290 Posts
Default

Our basement has a history of moisture. The previous owners had glued down carpet, which was terrible. I ripped all of that out and scraped off the old adhesive (a messy, terrible job) and then I put down a material called Platon and put a Pergo laminate floor over that. It has worked out well for 3 years now.

http://www.systemplaton.com/flooring.html

http://www.systemplaton.com/PDFs/P6_...Spec_Sheet.pdf
Old 12-09-2011, 03:03 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: 4 Seasons
Posts: 3,615
Received 680 Likes on 382 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by gf View Post
Our basement has a history of moisture. The previous owners had glued down carpet, which was terrible. I ripped all of that out and scraped off the old adhesive (a messy, terrible job) and then I put down a material called Platon and put a Pergo laminate floor over that. It has worked out well for 3 years now.

http://www.systemplaton.com/flooring.html

http://www.systemplaton.com/PDFs/P6_...Spec_Sheet.pdf
Thank you I will look into that system
Old 12-09-2011, 03:12 PM
  #11  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Cape Cod, MA
Posts: 2,375
Likes: 0
Received 42 Likes on 28 Posts
Default

GF,

How much did it cost for one roll of Platon, and where in Greater Boston did you get it?

TIA
Old 12-09-2011, 06:34 PM
  #12  
gf
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: North of Boston
Posts: 13,401
Received 403 Likes on 290 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Chuckster View Post

How much did it cost for one roll of Platon, and where in Greater Boston did you get it?

I actually have the receipt. It was $190.42 for a roll that is 75" X 65.5' and that was at Moynihan Lumber in North Reading in January 2009. I imagine any building supply place can order it.
Old 12-09-2011, 06:56 PM
  #13  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pgh Pa
Posts: 16,113
Received 1,322 Likes on 997 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Mine Now View Post
When we moved in this house we carpeted the basement and covered up commercial glue down tile. There is the possibility of asbestos. After a pump failure the carpet got saturated and was removed. Im looking at different options for new flooring. About 50sq ft of the tile has been removed around the perimeter of the basement because it was loose and had moisture under it. All total were looking at about 500sq ft of flooring. My options so far are to patch in the area where the tiles were removed and install new vinyl over the top or tear it all out and install ceremic tile. Under the tiles that were removed there looks like there is a grey paint plus tile adhesive. In order to use ceramic tile I might have to rent a scarifier to clean the cement prior to tile. Anyone have any suggestions
Keep in mind its winter and I cant really ventilate the basement very well.
Any products out there I may have missed?
What is the cause of your wet basement other then a pump failure? I gather you have a sump pump.If so you need to correct that issue first or you might be dealing with this again. There are battery backup systems avaiable for sump systems. Install the battery and plug in to 110 and it keeps battery charged.
Old 12-09-2011, 07:02 PM
  #14  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Pgh Pa
Posts: 16,113
Received 1,322 Likes on 997 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Mine Now View Post
When we moved in this house we carpeted the basement and covered up commercial glue down tile. There is the possibility of asbestos. After a pump failure the carpet got saturated and was removed. Im looking at different options for new flooring. About 50sq ft of the tile has been removed around the perimeter of the basement because it was loose and had moisture under it. All total were looking at about 500sq ft of flooring. My options so far are to patch in the area where the tiles were removed and install new vinyl over the top or tear it all out and install ceremic tile. Under the tiles that were removed there looks like there is a grey paint plus tile adhesive. In order to use ceramic tile I might have to rent a scarifier to clean the cement prior to tile. Anyone have any suggestions
Keep in mind its winter and I cant really ventilate the basement very well.
Any products out there I may have missed?
If you want to use vinyl you can scrape remaining tile up. I think it is Armstrong that makes vinyl the you use a double sided tape around the perimeter and crisscross from corner to corner. I have it in my kitchen and you wouldn't know the difference. If you have to take it up again just grab a corner and pull.
Old 12-09-2011, 08:56 PM
  #15  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Hobe Sound, Fl
Posts: 4,366
Received 455 Likes on 219 Posts
Default

When watching the HGTV shows, the Canadian dudes seem to always use something called Dry Lock (sp) which looks pretty cool. It has a raised rubber pad on the bottom and is a tounge and groove OSB on top. The flooring is layed on top of this.

Looks cool to me... then again I live in Florida; my basement is lined with plaster, has a drain in the bottom, and a pool vac in it.
Old 12-09-2011, 09:42 PM
  #16  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: louisville Ky
Posts: 2,389
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 2 Posts
Default

There are many systems out there that you can use. Most of the pre-finished snap-lock hardwoods or simulated hardwoods can be used.

Idealy you want a concrete floor that does not have very many dipps or ups and downs in it. The floor should be sealed and then covered with a moisture barrier/padding combo before laying the snap lock or other similar material down over it.

Read the fine print on anything you decide to purchase and install, many of the manufacturers have different stipulations on exactly what is required for it to be warranteed.

If your basement had the old asbestos tiles, they can be removed. As long as they are removed in large pieces with little dust, you should not have any issues. The only time asbestos is an issue is if it gets airborn. In a solid state, it is a non issue. Good luck on whatever you chose.
Old 12-09-2011, 10:27 PM
  #17  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: VA
Posts: 5,966
Likes: 0
Received 432 Likes on 269 Posts
Default

I put a floating floor in my basement, about 1000 sq feet. It's made by Formica, it looks like 12x12 tiles, comes in 1 x 4 foot sheets, clicked together, (I used glue in the joints as well) and went down quickly. Hardest part was cutting all the door jambs. Looks like ceramic tile, is almost indestructible, supposed to be 10 times harder than Formica counter top material, and is a little resilient under foot (has 1/8 inch foam vapor barrier underneath) and looks like it did when I put it down 10 years ago. Suitable for below grade applications. I think it was $4 per square foot in 2001. Have no idea what it would be today. I'd use it again in a heartbeat.
Old 12-10-2011, 06:21 AM
  #18  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Hobe Sound, Fl
Posts: 4,366
Received 455 Likes on 219 Posts
Default

Here was the stuff I was thinking of. Looks like a good idea to me and would allow a little water under. Plus it would but a barrier between the flooring and the concrete.

http://www.dricore.com/en/eIndex.aspx
Old 12-10-2011, 07:53 AM
  #19  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Arlington, VA
Posts: 4,290
Received 147 Likes on 56 Posts
Default

As for pumps, you can go overboard and treat it like a boat, which is what I did. Here's a cut and paste from a description I posted someplace else (for non-boaters):

We have a french drain around the entire basement perimeter connected to a sump in the front corner. In the sump are two 3500 gph pumps. A normal sump pump is in the 500 gph range. They're 12 volt dc bilge pumps, normally used for boats. Each pump has its own solid-state switch. Solid state switches are impervious to mechanical failures or hangups with debris. One switch is mounted higher than the other, so the second/backup pump only comes on when the first/primary pump fails or is overwhelmed. Each pump has a separate discharge out the side of the house. Both discharges have one-way valves to prevent backflow from outside water. The discharge from the primary pump is routed to the street through a 4" corrugated hose we buried under the front lawn. The discharge from the backup pump dumps into the side yard. If we're ever to the point where the backup pump is running, we don't care where the water ends up as long as it's not in the basement. There is a sealed agm group 27 deep cycle battery connected to each pump. Both batteries are connected to a charger which is then plugged into the wall. In this way, the pumps use house power when it's available and fall back to battery power when required. Each battery lasts for about four hours of continuous pumping and several days of once-per-minute pumping. The batteries, charger, and electrical outlet are all mounted high up off the floor to prevent any issues if water does make it into the basement. The wires between the pumps, batteries, and charger are long enough that the batteries can be moved to the floor or shelf as needed. All wire is tinned multi-strand copper and all connections are crimped and covered with adhesive-lined heatshrink to avoid corrosion and failures for many, many years. In addition to all this pumping capacity, we have also installed a one-way valve on the main sewer drain to prevent the type of storm/sewer water backflow that flooded us in september. We've also taken special efforts with carpet and other finishing elements to be as water and mold proof/resistant as possible.

Edit: The rains from tropical storm Lee in September caused a flash flood in our neighborhood. Water backflowed through a floor drain in our basement, but it was halfway up the windows outside. That means about 7' above floor level inside. Total water was above my knees and I'm 6'2". Even an inch or two in 24 hours causes our pumps to run.
Old 12-10-2011, 08:16 AM
  #20  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Naples/Ft Myers
Posts: 1,415
Likes: 0
Received 7 Likes on 7 Posts
Default

It sounds like moisture will be you enemy with any floor you lay on top of that basement slab. Have you thought of etching and staining the concrete? There are some very attractive treatments that can be done to concrete. Almost any design and colors are possible. Lots of restaurants and retail stores are doing this here in Florida. I am also seeing it in $$$ homes as well, it can look awesome.

Also eliminates the mold concern.

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.