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Old 11-05-2011, 12:13 PM
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It's starting to get cold and my gas bill last year (propane) for our base board hot water boiler was outragous. just went to Sears and bought a EdenPURE USA1000 for $399.00.

Of course its my first day but it is really heating well. Just wondering if anyone else has one and if it is as energy efficent as advertised.
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:22 PM
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I was just reading from their website and I don't see how it works any better than any other space heater. The one I looked at (2nd. best) was listed at $397.00 draws over 1,400 watts and puts out 5,000 btu. A small propane space heater puts out much more heat and I'd think propane still costs far less than electric.

Others with first hand knowledge???
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:29 PM
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Dont have one but a search brings up some mixed reviews.
http://www.viewpoints.com/Heaters?gc...YTe4AodsyAo1g#
My father in law has one of the DeLonghi oil filled radiators. It has lasted quite a long time. 10+yrs
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Old 11-05-2011, 12:30 PM
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Thanks,

I'm trying to use this in conjuncition with my regular heating. I have an odd home (simi split level). I've turned down the heat to 60 on the floor its running on and its keeping it at 70 so far at 50% power bar.

Anywho...the base board heat hasnt come on...so well see.
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Mine Now View Post
Dont have one but a search brings up some mixed reviews.
http://www.viewpoints.com/Heaters?gc...YTe4AodsyAo1g#
My father in law has one of the DeLonghi oil filled radiators. It has lasted quite a long time. 10+yrs
thats what we use. safe even heat, great with kids around.
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Old 11-05-2011, 01:55 PM
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I hope an electrical engineer can chime in on the Eden Pures and similar heaters. I've thought about one but have hard time justifying that much money for an electric heater. I know they are "safe" as in children or pets. It's my understanding they use some kinda quartz bulbs to generate the heat.

My feeling is...if something electrical is drawing 1500 watts then it puts out "X" amount of btu's. Doesn't matter if it's a toaster, hair dryer, milk house type heater, oil filled radiator etc. If this is not true, hopefully someone can explain why I should spend $399 on a heater??
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Old 11-05-2011, 02:41 PM
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All electric heraters are 100% efficient- that is all of the energy dissipated in your home turns to heat. (Production and On the way from the power plant - that's a different story) Quartz and infrared heaters may be more efficient only in terms of getting the heat to you and objects you sit on or touch and not heating up walls.

The cheapo 20 dollar heater at Walmart will do the same job. I think as a supplement a $50. quartz heater may be good if you just want to heat up one room such as the bathroom quick while you are showering - and not the whole house. Botaaholic is correct x amount of BTUs (or watts.) in equals x amount of BTUs (or watts.) out - period.

PS those $400. 100% efficient built by Amish fireplaces are simply 1500 watt heaters that are 20 bucks in Wallmart with a nice looking case. If you do the BTU to watt conversion you can see it. 1500 watts equals 5200 BTUs

BTW propane at $4.50 a gallon is probably about the same cost as electric heat in many areas. (I am a retired engineer but have not done this conversion for several years). If you tell me your cost per KW and cost of propane per gallon I can do it for you making a few assumptions about the efficiency of your furnace.

Last edited by LI Sound Grunt; 11-05-2011 at 03:01 PM.
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:06 PM
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Quote:PS those $400. 100% efficient built by Amish fireplaces are simply 1500 watt heaters that are 20 bucks in waWlmart with a nice looking case. If you do the BTU to watt conversion you can see it.
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True, but can you use the ones from Walmart as a night stand.
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Old 11-05-2011, 03:48 PM
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two years ago I changed out our propane base board hot water/hot water heater with a new more efficient one and cut the usage to about half of what was used before. Maybe its time to look for a better Propane heater. This is what I got.

http://www.laars.com/mascotii.aspx
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Old 11-06-2011, 08:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Boataholic View Post
I hope an electrical engineer can chime in on the Eden Pures and similar heaters. I've thought about one but have hard time justifying that much money for an electric heater. I know they are "safe" as in children or pets. It's my understanding they use some kinda quartz bulbs to generate the heat.

My feeling is...if something electrical is drawing 1500 watts then it puts out "X" amount of btu's. Doesn't matter if it's a toaster, hair dryer, milk house type heater, oil filled radiator etc. If this is not true, hopefully someone can explain why I should spend $399 on a heater??

Basically you are correct. There is a diff in materials, tho, and how those materials affect the heating of a room. 1500 watts for 1 hr dumped into the air is gone at the end of 1 hr. But 1500 watts dumped into a piece of cast iron for 1 hr will continue to radiate heat into the room after 1-hr. Either way you get the same 1500 watts for the same price.

Also, where you place the heater can make a hell of a difference. You want it where the most heat flows OUT of the room, e.g. below a big window or next to an open door space.

Just picked up a 1500w quartz space heater at Costco for $50. Has a built in time, heat settings, and comes with a nifty remote control.
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Old 11-06-2011, 10:16 AM
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For me, there's no part of this house that's not used almost equally. A personal space heater might be good if you have a large single zone house or if you're couch potato that doesn't move much. With that said, I like a warm bathroom and have a portable oil filed "radiator" in there. The bath will have radiant floor heat if I do a remodel.

I believe Quartz heaters heat the objects they're pointed at, so they would be good if you're going to be in the same spot for long periods. I'm not real familiar with Quartz heaters, but I have a picture of red hot quartz in my head and assume they might not be a good fit for all applications.

Heaters with fans can be a problem if you have pets. Its amazing how much fur can build up on a fan in a short time.

The only space heaters that I feel should not be used in a home are unvented propane or kerosene heaters. There's a reason that you have to leave a bedroom window partially open per code when in use.

So, the only way a space heater saves you anything is by heating a small space that you are occupying while leaving the rest of the house set at a lower temperature. Another plus for a space heater is comfort. If you want to watch the TV at 70 degrees and leave the remainder of the house at 66, then you have zoned heat.

Obviously, proper insulation, good windows and an efficient heating system is the long term answer.
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Eyeball View Post
Basically you are correct. There is a diff in materials, tho, and how those materials affect the heating of a room. 1500 watts for 1 hr dumped into the air is gone at the end of 1 hr. But 1500 watts dumped into a piece of cast iron for 1 hr will continue to radiate heat into the room after 1-hr. Either way you get the same 1500 watts for the same price.

Also, where you place the heater can make a hell of a difference. You want it where the most heat flows OUT of the room, e.g. below a big window or next to an open door space.

Just picked up a 1500w quartz space heater at Costco for $50. Has a built in time, heat settings, and comes with a nifty remote control.
Does not matter what the btu's go into and then radiate from.
A heat sink of cast iron or any other dense material will absorb the btu's and release the btu's at the same rate. Insulating the downstream side will slow down the release but then your not getting the benefit.
Your just experiencing a lag between the time it goes in till when you will feel it come out.

And dumping the heat out of the room or thru a big window makes no sense at all.
Your not going to be warmer if your trying to heat the great outdoors.
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Old 11-06-2011, 03:29 PM
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I'm not going to bet any money on the accuracy of this, but last week I was reading an article that said using two 'typical' electric space heaters costs about the same as heating a 'typical' entire house with natural gas.
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Old 11-07-2011, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by DoubleO7 View Post

And dumping the heat out of the room or thru a big window makes no sense at all.
Your not going to be warmer if your trying to heat the great outdoors.

Yes it does -- and yes you will.

If you are heating a room you want the heat source closest to where most of the heat gets sucked out. Windows and open doors are great exit points for a room's heat, thus, the best place to place the heat source. Think it though it makes sense ... enough so that damn near every radiator or floor heater is placed under a window or near doors that are frequently opened.

This way you are heating the room from the coldest point inward. Makes for a warmer room. Placing the heat source further from where heat exits results in the heat moving in a strait line from source to exit. That leaves you with an unevenly heated room that is warm on one side and cold on the other. Remember, heat always moves toward the coldest area.
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Old 11-07-2011, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by DoubleO7 View Post
Does not matter what the btu's go into and then radiate from.
A heat sink of cast iron or any other dense material will absorb the btu's and release the btu's at the same rate. Insulating the downstream side will slow down the release but then your not getting the benefit.
Your just experiencing a lag between the time it goes in till when you will feel it come out.

And dumping the heat out of the room or thru a big window makes no sense at all.
Your not going to be warmer if your trying to heat the great outdoors.
Believe it or not, you guys are both kinda right about the window. If you have a baseboard heater in a room, under a window is an ideal place for it. Not because heat is exiting the area, but because cold air above it (from the window) is falling, and the warm air from the heater is rising, creating a tumbling effect. This helps spread the air around the room more efficiently than placing the same baseboard heater on the wall opposite the window.


In terms of space heaters in general, electric heat is stupidly expensive (per BTU) compared to propane, oil, or natural gas. The reason that space heaters can save money is that they provide a simple way to heat a small area, enabling you to keep the rest of the house cooler. Let's say we have identical houses with identical heating systems. If we keep the houses at 60, our heating costs will be low, let's say $250/month. If I raise mine up to 70 degrees, I'll spend 30% more on heating costs than you. So if my gas bill is $250/month, raising it 10 degrees will tack on another $75.

If I use a space heater, I can keep the house at 60, and just use a space heater to heat a single room. So our gas bills will both be back down to $250/ month, but I will be paying a higher electric bill. Even though electricity is roughly 75% more expensive for heat over natural gas, I'll still save money. It costs $75 in gas to raise the whole house 10 degrees, and about $132 in electricity to bring the whole house up 10 degrees, so yes electricity is more expensive. However, raising a single room up 10 degrees may only use $30 in electricity per month (based on a rough estimate of my hot tub, so not that scientific).

So if I use a space heater, I save $75 in gas, but spend $30 in electricity, so I'm still $45 to the good. However, if I get a second space heater for another room, now I'm spending $60 in electricity to save $75 of gas. That's why two space heaters aren't a popular option.

Last edited by jobowker; 11-07-2011 at 10:53 AM.
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Old 11-07-2011, 11:01 AM
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Without writing a dissertation on thermodynamics, I'll try to simplify. Heat doesn't "flow" outside, it doesn't even rise, the warmed particles in the air rise and the cold (heavier) particles fall.

A cast iron radiator is mostly radiant heat. Cast iron baseboard is both radiant and convection. Fin tube baseboard is convection heat. Registers are for forced air heat.

So, with that out of the way. The reason for a radiator or baseboard or a register to be near the coldest spot in a room (typically a window), is to try to stop the transfer of heat from warm to cold. The design of the system is based on the assumption of "reasonable" insulating properties of the the outside walls, floors, ceiling, windows and doors.

Again, if you want to save money heating the house, turn down the thermostat. If you want to be comfortable in a cold house, get a space heater that warms you where you're sitting. If you can close off the room you're in, the placement of the space heater would depend on the use of the room, it's configuration and the location of the furniture.

Remember, because heat transfers to cold, there is a declining value to heating one room unless all four walls, the floor and ceiling are insulated.
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Old 11-07-2011, 11:05 AM
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I see jobowker has added to his original post while I was writing.

To add to his thought, you have to factor in the original cost of the space heater and that they typically don't last very long and need to be replaced.
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Old 11-07-2011, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by davedowneast View Post
I see jobowker has added to his original post while I was writing.

To add to his thought, you have to factor in the original cost of the space heater and that they typically don't last very long and need to be replaced.
I'm sneaky that way.
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Old 11-07-2011, 02:37 PM
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I wanted to add that unless your sitting right next to or in front of a space heater w approx 5K BTU you will not realize any real heating from it.

As a kid we lived in a home and used a space heater to help keep the room warm when the furnace broke down (we were pretty poor) I can't say I ever felt any kind of warmth from the heater unless I sat in front of it.
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Old 11-07-2011, 03:51 PM
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Why didn't you just get one of these and tap it into your boiler system?

http://www.wooddoctorfurnace.com/original.html
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