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TO everyone saying Irene was a tiny little storm and we are wimps for getting worried

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TO everyone saying Irene was a tiny little storm and we are wimps for getting worried

Old 08-29-2011, 05:11 PM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by TheRealMacGyver View Post
I have to admit that I really didn't expect the damage that it caused, at least not early on when they were talking about the northern states. Usually hurricanes die out pretty quick when they get that far north. As someone else said, be extra careful, if you have damage, working on cleanup. I went through the "no-name" storm in 1993 and had the Gulf of Mexico up to my belly button in my house! I know the feeling and it is something I will never forget. Be safe my friends.
Flew to Florida the day of that storm and spent some time in Crystal River the day after, what a mess. Never saw the ground on the flight from Wisconsin all the way to Florida.

Speaking of "no-name" storms I happened to pick up this book out East a few years back......riveting book

Amazon.com: A Wind To Shake The World (Allen Reprints ...


Hurricane of '38: Wind that Shook the World - Yankee Magazine
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Old 08-29-2011, 05:20 PM
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No doubt it was a bad storm but the newsies made it sound much worse. New England seems to be getting the worst of it with flooded rivers and such. It happens there isnt much you can do except rebuild.
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Old 08-29-2011, 05:34 PM
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Not to downplay the storm, but it was mild by all accounts. It was much more than a tropical depression with alot of rain. Yes, I have lived in Florida ll my life and I can tell you what the aftermath of a Category 3 - 5 storm looks like, I've lived it. Went 18 days without power after the last hurricane, can't remember the name as it wasn't a large one by our accounts. My sister's house was right in the middle of Andrew's path and you could fly over neighborhood after neighborhood where every house had at least the roof gone and many had walls missing, if they were still standing at all....and that was for mile after mile. I do feel sorry for the people on the east coast that had to experience this storm, but I also feel fortunate for them that it was not a higher category storm. i also feel fortunate that those that got the water only got the amount they did, they said this storm was traveling at 13-16 mph, which is relatively quick for a hurricane. Can you imagine the amount of water/flooding that would have occurred had this storm stalled or been a slow moving storm and stayed much longer in the affected areas? Good luck to all that were affected and be safe while trying to restore some normalcy to your lives.
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Old 08-29-2011, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Garett View Post
The Misses was watching a CNN live broadcasting of the storm. CNN had many different reporters reporting from many different locations up and down the eastern shoreline.

Well this one reporter for CNN was flopping all over the place as if the wind was trying to blow him into the next county, when there was a handful of civilians standing in the background acting like it was a perfectly clear and calm day.....I had to hang my head in almost laughter.

This other reporter for CNN was standing on a beach commenting on how the wind was almost blowing him off his feet and that he needed a pole to hang on to, yet the scruff brush around him was almost still.

Yet another reporter for CNN was taking shelter behind a building corner because the storm/ wind was blowing him every which way but Sunday, yet the trees in the background were barely swaying in the breeze.

So what's the motto, no news is news unless it is BIG news?
after a few minutes of a couple reporters bobble headed effects... it dawned on me..

the cameramen were rock steady, as were the strolling beachgoers behind them, must've been a helluva breeze in between them
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Old 08-29-2011, 05:52 PM
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Originally Posted by thajeffski View Post
Well - it was the worst storm I've seen here in my lifetime of 30 years. Highest storm surge ever. 100mph IS a bad storm dude. You are doing exactly what this thread is about. People dismissing this storm as "Not a bad storm" geeze.
By the honest tone of your wording, I know that you have not really seen nor have you been in a "bad" storm. I went through hurrican Andrew in south FL, wind speed clocked at over 168 mph on the base. We had entire buildings including the foundations completeley removed, yes...I said the foundation . I think everyone on this thread will agree that it certainly did some widespread damage, and the loss of life sucks to be sure. But, the photo's you have shown only account for a very small portion of the total picture. Most places did not see much damage at all. You must be able to look at the big picture my friend. Don't be fooled by coverage that concentrates on only one aspect of something and completely ignors everything else to make their own viewpoint plausable.

The media, all 4 big boy's, had this things wiping out the entire east coast dude. The media in my opinion is completely irresponsible in their coverage and hype everything they report on for pure sensationalism, plain & simple.

Journalism died in the late 80's, may God rest it's soul!!!
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Old 08-29-2011, 07:30 PM
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Just wait until you guy's get to deal with all the strapping and uplift requirements you have coming now.
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Old 08-29-2011, 08:28 PM
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I have been through several hurricanes living in fla and while irene was a bad storm it was not near as bad as some in fla and the gulf coast. had irene been a 3 or 4 when it hit would've been far worse. It sucks dealing with hurricanes but for those of us who live in the zone near or on the water its the risk we run. Have to prepare the best you can and play the cards you are dealt. thats just how it flushes out sometimes,it sucks
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Old 08-30-2011, 02:35 AM
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I wish they would just tell the truth if they know. They may or may not have the ability to know the truth. They sure are experts after the fact though.

A day before landfall all the models were in agreement that it was going to come ashore near Morehead city. I also kept hearing stuff like Cat 3, Cat 4, and 100 yr storm. My boat was in Surf City (about 55miles in a straight line from Morehead). Based on the size of the storm and the forecasted strength I went and boarded up the house and brought my boat back to Raleigh. It was a waste of time and money. If I had known it was going to be a Cat 1 coming ashore 50 miles away I would not have bothered. Cat 3 or 4 50 miles away could likely be devastating, Cat 1 that far away = standing water in the yard.

Hurricane Fran came ashore 50 miles south of Surf City as a cat 3, damage in Surf City was devastating. (1996). Hurricane Bonnie came ashore near the same area as a cat 1 borderline 2, very limited damage in Surf City.

Getting the strength correct is very important, I wish they were better at it or truthful (whatever the case may be).
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Old 08-30-2011, 03:32 AM
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I have been thru enough hurricanes and tropical depressions along the Gulf Coast to know that, despite best efforts, weather technology is not perfect. I have seen storms twist and turn. I have seen them get bigger and get smaller. The folks broadcasting the weather (including NOAA) try their best but with too many variables the forecasts are not perfect.

What is getting better is the knowledge that only fools try to ride out a really bad storm. We have had people told to evacuate Galveston Island and the storm was smaller than forecast. Then in 2008 some don't evacuate and we get a storm that was as big as forecast. Hurricane IKE was only a Cat 2 but it was big and had a storm surge of 12 feet on top of a high tide.

Anyone care to guess how high most of Galveston Island is?

I think there was close to $30 billion in damage from IKE. I did not have water or electricity for 2 weeks in Houston.

Sorry you got hit by a storm. Stop complaining about the news and forecasts - they are idiots selling commercials - and be glad you did not get hammered and lose your life or home.
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Old 08-30-2011, 04:59 AM
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i guess one is left wondering how many would feel if it was their home that was damaged or destroyed or their loved one who was lost and they had something like this to read with people talking about how mild and overblown it was by the media....

great op...thanks....and todays paper has the death count at 38 as they are pulling bodies from the floodwaters...
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Old 08-30-2011, 05:56 AM
  #31  
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Not sure how u guys down south do it.

we get this low cat 1 or a TD and we have been without power since 3 am sunday morning.

I can deal without power, we have food to eat and friends/family nearyby with power. the electric compqny hasa no clue. They have 800 people working hard, but from what I have seen in my small town that is 12 miles inland, there is no window to get my power back on.

Worst is that we are on well water and thus flushing the toilet is manual with a bucket of water. I feel like it is primitive times, every place I go I have 6 1.5 gal jugs and looking to fill them.

Thank god it is not hot.

Best is that the boat is fine and in its slip. kids have no school, will be out on the water today. went out yesterday and it was the only time all day that I felt "normal"

Not devastating to us, but not fun.

Best to all.
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Old 08-30-2011, 06:06 AM
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For the outer banks it was nothing unusual......yes RT 12 washed out, but it does every couple years!!!! Power outages of this scale are not that uncommon along NC and VA either, we have storms that do this every couple years, that is why over 50% of the homes in my neighborhood have generators running right now.

The upper NE doesn't usually see storms like this and combined with record rainfall before the storm it made things even worse. Note virtually all of the NE damage is from flooded rivers where the ground was already saturated and rainwater could only run-off. Wind damage, even in coastal NC/VA was minimal compared to storms in the past. Storm surge was much less for most areas as well. During Isabel (2003) we had 4ft of water in our garage 60-70 miles inland......this storm the water stopped roughly 2 vertical feet from even getting to our garage.

The storm was bad, for NC/VA it was not the worst one in the last 10 years.
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Old 08-30-2011, 06:07 AM
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Originally Posted by fichtion View Post
Not sure how u guys down south do it.

we get this low cat 1 or a TD and we have been without power since 3 am sunday morning.

I can deal without power, we have food to eat and friends/family nearyby with power. the electric compqny hasa no clue. They have 800 people working hard, but from what I have seen in my small town that is 12 miles inland, there is no window to get my power back on.

Worst is that we are on well water and thus flushing the toilet is manual with a bucket of water. I feel like it is primitive times, every place I go I have 6 1.5 gal jugs and looking to fill them.

Thank god it is not hot.

Best is that the boat is fine and in its slip. kids have no school, will be out on the water today. went out yesterday and it was the only time all day that I felt "normal"

Not devastating to us, but not fun.

Best to all.
You learn to adjust. It was well into the 2nd week without power that I stopped walking into a room and instinctively flipped the light switch. The nights were the roughest for us, in the 80's at night with still, humid air and generators going all around....that's the only time those cold showers felt good and were welcomed. After eating PB&J for three days straight, you really start looking forward to something else, I learned a gas grill with a side plate burner was a must, boiling water for spaghetti was nice. Fortunately, we had water, I feel for you. One positive we came away with from it though, we got to play lot's of cards and dominoes by candle light with friends and have some great memories. Good luck to you and enjoy some fresh fish on the grill.
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Old 08-30-2011, 06:19 AM
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Originally Posted by runabout View Post
You learn to adjust. It was well into the 2nd week without power that I stopped walking into a room and instinctively flipped the light switch. The nights were the roughest for us, in the 80's at night with still, humid air and generators going all around....that's the only time those cold showers felt good and were welcomed. After eating PB&J for three days straight, you really start looking forward to something else, I learned a gas grill with a side plate burner was a must, boiling water for spaghetti was nice. Fortunately, we had water, I feel for you. One positive we came away with from it though, we got to play lot's of cards and dominoes by candle light with friends and have some great memories. Good luck to you and enjoy some fresh fish on the grill.
One will learn quick to cook just about anything on a grill if they have too. Went almost 3 weeks without power but had eggs and coffee just about everyday
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Old 08-30-2011, 06:45 AM
  #35  
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hurricanes suck no matter what. they really suck when at 140+mph.

.........coping with the aftermath is the same. break out all the frozen stuff and fire up the gas grill. then the canned stuff. when the water and canned stuff are gone, break out your firearms because that's when life gets interesting.

Last edited by TSA; 08-30-2011 at 07:11 AM.
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Old 08-30-2011, 06:52 AM
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Originally Posted by fichtion View Post
Not sure how u guys down south do it.
Practice, practice, practice.
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Old 08-30-2011, 08:06 AM
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My LI beach home made it unscathed. In fact I was comparing photos that neighbors sent me with similar photos from the March (? I think) Noreaster this year. The water looked angrier in March honestly.

If I can get them on to the same device/computer I'll put them up later.

The flooding, I get it, that's bad, but as far as wind storms go, it wasn't much here in DC or apparently in LI.
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Old 08-30-2011, 08:15 AM
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Now we may have another one coming.
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Old 08-30-2011, 08:37 AM
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Here in northern NJ the majority of homes inland from the coast about five miles or more have basements. The majority of these homes with basements rarely if ever flood, many are not even fitted with sump pumps as they are not normally needed. Of the sixty or seventy people I have spoken to in the last two days with basements, all but one of them had water in their basements. Some had an inch, most had about a foot or two when they lost power and the sump pumps stopped running, some had a lot more.

One of my best customers had a total of 14 feet enter one of their buildings. The basement has eleven foot ceilings, but all of the mechanical equiupment was relocated a few years ago to the first floor to "eliminate" the chance of flood damage. Unfortunately this flood surpassed all of the others and ruined all of the new equipment as it rose two feet above the first floor. Their maintenance staff was literally pulling small fish from the hallways yesterday during the clean-up efforts. All of the tennants are seniors and had to be evacuated to higher ground during the storm. FEMA and the National Gaurd has their hands full around here, thats for sure.

One more problem that I keep noticing around here is that many homes heat with oil and have have indoor 275 gallon oil tanks (situated in the basement). As you know oil it lighter than water and when a basement floods with a few feet of water the oil tanks tend to want to float. Many homes and busnesses have spilled gallons upon gallon of fuel oil in the basement only to be pumped out to the street when power resumes and the sump pumps get turned back on. Talk about a mess and a nasty smell... I guess the EPA and the DEP will be very busy as well for the next few weeks with all the clean up efforts. Yesterday it smelled like a gallon of diesel fuel was spilled on my front seat of my car whenever I got within a 100 yeards of the local river.
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Old 08-30-2011, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by baypro21 View Post
I wish they would just tell the truth if they know. They may or may not have the ability to know the truth. They sure are experts after the fact though.

A day before landfall all the models were in agreement that it was going to come ashore near Morehead city. I also kept hearing stuff like Cat 3, Cat 4, and 100 yr storm. My boat was in Surf City (about 55miles in a straight line from Morehead). Based on the size of the storm and the forecasted strength I went and boarded up the house and brought my boat back to Raleigh. It was a waste of time and money. If I had known it was going to be a Cat 1 coming ashore 50 miles away I would not have bothered. Cat 3 or 4 50 miles away could likely be devastating, Cat 1 that far away = standing water in the yard.

Hurricane Fran came ashore 50 miles south of Surf City as a cat 3, damage in Surf City was devastating. (1996). Hurricane Bonnie came ashore near the same area as a cat 1 borderline 2, very limited damage in Surf City.

Getting the strength correct is very important, I wish they were better at it or truthful (whatever the case may be).

I have been told many times by those who have made a career out of storm tracking that one of the most difficult things to predict is storm intensity at landfall. There have been many storms that can throw a curveball at the last hour before landfall, or even spawn tornadoes once inland. Sometimes these storms are non-events. Sometimes they turn into something WAY bigger than expected. Hurricane Wilma taught us that. Wilma was supposed to dissapate into a Cat 1 once it made landfall. Thanks to the Everglades, the heat, moisture etc. Wilma hit Ft. Lauderdale as a CAT3!! People went weeks without power and infrastructure was down all over south Florida.

I've lived in the Florida Keys for 20 years. I've only evacuated once, and that storm (Ivan) missed us alltogether. I am however always prepared. I think you did the right thing and took the right precautions. Don't Monday-Morning quarterback yourself. I'd say well done.

Last edited by burningdaylight; 08-30-2011 at 10:58 AM.
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