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Tomato plant spots

Old 06-05-2011, 02:07 PM
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Default Tomato plant spots

Ok with global warming and all these last few years I put my tomatos in early - 2 weeks before Memorial day weekend (One row of beans rotted and all the squash so I replanted them - the peas did fine). And it was warm no frost but maybe too wet. So I got these tiny white and brown spots on the lower leaves but seems like no bugs or mites and the newer leaves seem clean - should I do anything - I only had to use an oil or soap spray once 2 years ago when we had that Alabama tomato blight thing. I will see if can get a picture. I grow these thngs only because they grow OK usually here without any pesticides. Hopefully Picture to come.

Lower leaves

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upper newer leaves

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Old 06-05-2011, 02:30 PM
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Its a fungus or disease, you can buy chemicals that you mix in a sprayer and spray the plants with. Daconil is the name of the chemical I think.
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Old 06-05-2011, 02:35 PM
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itr is the blite and you need to treat them
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Old 06-05-2011, 02:37 PM
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You probably want to pull the limbs that are infested off.
.
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Old 06-05-2011, 02:43 PM
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Too cool , too wet and not enough sun.

We should be into nice enough weather not to do anything.

If you feel your plants have been compomised to the point it will effect your expected yield, maybe some new plants.

I had 43 degrees last night.
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Old 06-05-2011, 02:45 PM
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Do you fertilize any?
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Old 06-05-2011, 02:56 PM
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Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
Do you fertilize any?
It looks like he deluted a bag of concrete mix with 3 bags of sand and a bag of cow manure???
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by lobstercatcher View Post
It looks like he deluted a bag of concrete mix with 3 bags of sand and a bag of cow manure???
lol, to the OP in the future dig a hole about 8 or 10 inches deep and about 8 inches wide, fill it with garden soil and black cow, and pull the lowest limbs of and plant the tomato about 4 or 5 inches deep helps it root better. And calcium nitrate which is 15.5-0-0 is the only fertilizer required and helps with bottom end rot.
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:05 PM
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Some of mine did the same thing. I just snipped them off. The tomatos I put in later didn't do that and are much larger than the ones I planted early. I had my cabbage and onions in 3rd week of February this year. The onions did good but the cabbage went to seed when we had a hot spell.
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:09 PM
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These are a few we planted in the way I said above and we have a dozen more just like them.
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:20 PM
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Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post



These are a few we planted in the way I said above and we have a dozen more just like them.
I see that you got some sandy soil good lookin plants they do have some suckers got to love that southren livin
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:25 PM
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Originally Posted by ladyjane View Post
I see that you got some sandy soil good lookin plants they do have some suckers got to love that southren livin
I'd guess he could make some purdy good sweet potato ridges!
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:31 PM
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Thats why we dig the hole and fill it in with soil and black cow.

No sweet potatoes in the fields, all cotton
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:31 PM
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Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
Do you fertilize any?
First time since planting today.

Originally Posted by lobstercatcher View Post
It looks like he deluted a bag of concrete mix with 3 bags of sand and a bag of cow manure???
That's about right....

Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
You probably want to pull the limbs that are infested off.
.
OK I will

Originally Posted by ladyjane View Post
itr is the blite and you need to treat them
I was afraid of that - probably came with the plants?

Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
lol, to the OP in the future dig a hole about 8 or 10 inches deep and about 8 inches wide, fill it with garden soil and black cow, and pull the lowest limbs of and plant the tomato about 4 or 5 inches deep helps it root better. And calcium nitrate which is 15.5-0-0 is the only fertilizer required and helps with bottom end rot.
That is what I usually do - I usually do 10 10 10. Didn't have any this year but used potting soil that said it had all

Originally Posted by KJS View Post
Some of mine did the same thing. I just snipped them off. The tomatos I put in later didn't do that and are much larger than the ones I planted early. I had my cabbage and onions in 3rd week of February this year. The onions did good but the cabbage went to seed when we had a hot spell.
Thanks - I'll snip them suckers now

Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
Its a fungus or disease, you can buy chemicals that you mix in a sprayer and spray the plants with. Daconil is the name of the chemical I think.
Thanks I am gonna see if I can get them looking better first with cutting and more fertilizer - they look much more anemic this year than usual..until a few days ago I just let them be

Thanks to all Happy Farming ...
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:46 PM
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you must be getting some tomatoes by now. I'm starting to get some on a regular basis.
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
lol, to the OP in the future dig a hole about 8 or 10 inches deep and about 8 inches wide, fill it with garden soil and black cow, and pull the lowest limbs of and plant the tomato about 4 or 5 inches deep helps it root better. And calcium nitrate which is 15.5-0-0 is the only fertilizer required and helps with bottom end rot.
I had some leftover plants so I tried this a couple weeks ago.They seem to be doing pretty good for just doing it.
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Old 07-17-2011, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by lobstercatcher View Post
I had some leftover plants so I tried this a couple weeks ago.They seem to be doing pretty good for just doing it.
It helps a lot, due to the hot and dry weather its harder to keep them from getting bottom end rot, we are having it worse then usual this year. We have plenty of tomatoes, so many you cant keep up with them, we have been giving them away.
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:01 PM
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Originally Posted by outlaw gunner View Post
It helps a lot, due to the hot and dry weather its harder to keep them from getting bottom end rot, we are having it worse then usual this year. We have plenty of tomatoes, so many you cant keep up with them, we have been giving them away.
want me to send you a few chipmunks They eat them faster than you can find a ripe one. I am growing some yellow low acidic which I looked at them on Friday... thinking I can get my first beuties of these today... the little shits beat me to them
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:02 PM
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For some reason we never have problem with wildlife bothering our garden, now at my uncles garden which is only a few hundred yards away the deer eat about a thousand dollars worth of peas a year, we are just lucky not to have to deal with wild hogs tho
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:13 PM
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I never use to have a problem either.. But we use to have a cat. It must of been enough to keep everything away?

well except coyotes
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