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long term food storage anyone doing it?

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long term food storage anyone doing it?

Old 04-26-2011, 06:43 PM
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Default long term food storage anyone doing it?

I am no survival nut and we do prepare somewhat during hurricane season but has anyone gotten into the freeze dried long term food storage set up.
Given all thats been going on lately in world events me thinks I might study this issue a little closer. the question is who are the reputable suppliers?
Just curious to see if people here are really into it.
I know the one thing I will be doing is freezing as much fish as possible and maximizing my legal take the rest of this year.
Old 04-26-2011, 06:53 PM
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I was checking this one http://www.foodinsurance.com/ out a few weeks ago. Didn't do much more than think about it, but I wouldn't consider anyone being prepared a nutcase at all! I figure if it gets really bad there are enough squirrels around to keep me alive for awhile
Old 04-26-2011, 08:51 PM
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If things get that bad, I don't think I would put too much faith in my electricity(freezer). 50-100 pounds each of dry rice and beans is not a bad idea, and not expensive.
Old 04-26-2011, 09:36 PM
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I agree with glacierbaze, power might become a problem. I like the idea of dried rice and beans. I bought a couple of minnow traps just in case I need to get bait to fish with. I've also got plenty of .22 ammo for small critters and birds. It also occured to me that salt might become valuable for preserving things you catch or grow. You can also store honey just about forever.
Old 04-27-2011, 05:09 AM
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http://www.thehulltruth.com/boating-...ditch-bag.html

This thread is more about Ditch-Bag supplies but there are links to several sites that sell "Survival" supplies, literature and equipment.

For sheltering-in-place, regular canned foods are an efficient and economical product. Canned food is already cooked and ready to be eaten. It will be safe to eat until the container loses integrity although flavor and nutritional value may decrease. Foods with high acidity should be used before the expiration date unless the container is glass or plastic lined (eg tomatoes).

Some people buy the smaller serving units and assemble the equivalent of C-Rations. Cans are better than MRE's for long-term storage because non-refridgerated MRE's need to be used wihtin a few months. I have used MRE's for camping trips and enjoyed them but the variety available to the public is/was not that great.

Dry foods like crackers and dried fruit will come in handy too. Don't forget to stock up on "luxury" supplies like coffee, tea and hot-chocolate. Everyone enjoys a good pick-me-up on a cold day.

There's no need to go over-board on this. I know you can buy buckets of wheat to mill for flour but a better way to invest your money (imo) is to buy the foods you normally eat but stock enough for the period of time you can afford. Then rotate your supplies on a regular basis without disrupting your diet. You can also build up gradually by getting an extra day's worth (or two, or three...) of material each time you shop.

After you stock up it is advisable to be discreet about your preperations. No matter how much you buy you will probably not have enough to share with everyone you know. Also, people gossip about the "nut with the bunker of food." This can attract 'scavengers,' and agents of the government may want to 'equitably re-distribute food supplies' to the general public.

Good luck!
Old 04-27-2011, 05:23 AM
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My brother inlaw has bought the freeze dried stuff. He says it isn't bad either. It is pretty darn expensive though. I just keep a couple hundred pounds of rice and canned tuna, salmon, and canned beans. When it gets close to expiration I take it to the food bank. I am not an alarmist but having some spare food in the basement is never a bad idea.
Old 04-27-2011, 06:02 AM
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I've got a short list of 17 items that I keep adding to and rotating. The worst that I see is that maybe we'll end up eating and using it up. Whats the harm in that, at least I feel slightly prepared. Of course guns and ammo and a stash of gas. You can keep a freezer frozen with a generator and very little fuel for quite awhile if you don't open uselessly. I don't think we'll ever see commodities cheaper than today. I store the dry stuff in cleaned out compound buckets.
Old 04-27-2011, 06:06 AM
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We are right there with you preparing for hurricanes and the worst case scenario.......We keep stock piles of flour, sugar, canned products, coffee, alcohol, vegetable oil, etc etc etc....We have a storage room that is naturally cool from being inside a warehouse and a dehumidifier.....500 gallons of propane, 500 gallons of diesel for the generators, working on 200-300 gallons of gasoline.

Ammunition stock always multiplying, 22 caliber best all around round to keep for survival, cheap and light to carry, good for small game hunting.

Just my $.02, we feel it will hit the fan one day, might as well have items to survive and barter with!
Old 04-27-2011, 06:27 AM
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I recently bought 15 or 20 packs of heirloom vegetable seeds and stored them in an empty (never-used) paint can with some silica gel packs. Heirloom (non-GMO) seeds will allow you to let a few plants go to seed, then you can save the seeds and replant the next year. Keeping the seeds dark and dry (in the paint can) will allow them to last up to 7 years. I plan to rotate them out, but always have a stash for the following season.
Just bought a bunch of dried beans, and will grab a big bag of rice soon. I also have a few thousand rounds of .22 LR. I keep a spare propane tank filled also. The salt is a good idea. I'm trying to be somewhat prepared without being whacko about it.
Old 04-27-2011, 07:16 AM
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Cans!

As far as just the food aspect. I agree with the cans. The shelf life is more than your shelf life. After several years it will change in taste and color and some nutritional value but is still edible and nutritious.

We also are not survival nuts but ..

What we do is keep a good amount of dated (we date the purchase date with a sharpie) cans in the cool dry basement and try to rotate stuff we use like canned vegetables and canned tuna and salmon. Anything dried had to be in special packets like the Army LRRPs or whatever they call them now. Grains and flour and pasta go bad (usually the bugs find them and those self seal buckets ain't good enough) unless vacuum sealed in cans.

You can get canned vegetables and meats and other processed stuff like soups and hash and stuff - but unless you actually eat soups and hash and stuff I would stock mainly what you can rotate - and like I said - even that is not necessary except for color and taste. Unfortunately the canned food section gets smaller each year - stock up now or go on-line.

Happy Eating!
Old 04-27-2011, 07:54 AM
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GMO seeds are not necessarily sterile, they are just proprietary, and in the case of soy beans, you are not allowed to clean the seeds for re-planting.
Old 04-27-2011, 08:13 AM
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i can skin a buck, i can run a trout line and a country boy can survive!!! lol
Old 04-27-2011, 09:44 AM
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Originally Posted by wannabefishin View Post
i can skin a buck, i can run a trout line and a country boy can survive!!! lol
I keep telling my wife that if things get really bad, rednecks will be at the top of the food chain. (Before anyone jumps on me, I come from pure redneck stock so I can say it.)
Old 04-27-2011, 09:53 AM
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I stocked up with several cases of beer and booze but I drank it. I have this problem trying to stock pile stuff. I have this guy on retainer if we get hit with the big one.

Old 04-27-2011, 12:02 PM
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Fixin to make a bunch of Brandy here,for the tough times
Old 04-27-2011, 12:28 PM
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Originally Posted by wannabefishin View Post
i can skin a buck, i can run a trout line and a country boy can survive!!! lol

Beans, rice and canned goods for short term emergencies such as hurricanes, floods etc. Learned my lesson during Hurricanes Floyd and Dennis. If it really hits the fan, small game will be wiped out pretty quick by all the country boys (myself included).
Old 04-27-2011, 02:55 PM
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I have a house a block from the ocean and 15,000 acres of wild game 3 blocks from me.my kids will eat,may not be what they want but......
Old 04-27-2011, 03:19 PM
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How to dress a squirrel (in case anyone was hungry) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7rmQ-v2OtZU
Old 04-27-2011, 03:36 PM
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canned goods, dry goods vacuum sealed, bottled water, propane, diesel, all good. However, I believe that if it hits the fan antibiotics and pain killers are going to be a hot commodity.

generators are great but they draw an awful lot of attention. As mentioned previously, a low profile may be a plus.
Old 04-27-2011, 03:58 PM
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Originally Posted by adimice View Post
I've got a short list of 17 items that I keep adding to and rotating. The worst that I see is that maybe we'll end up eating and using it up. Whats the harm in that, at least I feel slightly prepared. Of course guns and ammo and a stash of gas. You can keep a freezer frozen with a generator and very little fuel for quite awhile if you don't open uselessly. I don't think we'll ever see commodities cheaper than today. I store the dry stuff in cleaned out compound buckets.

In a nut shell this ^^^^ Good post.

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