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Sidewalk ideas pavers?

Old 04-21-2011, 05:14 AM
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Default Sidewalk ideas pavers?

OK I am sick of listening to the subtle bitching from the Admiral. And this old short walkway from the driveway to the steps was just brick type patio blocks - see photo. And the severe winter did bust it up a lot. So I have taken it up and am digging out and am thinking of throwing in a curve - I do it with those paver blocks....(haven't even gone to the yard yet -do they have curved pieces or half blocks or something to make cornors really don't wanna split stuff) ....any other thoughts? I am planning on a piece of slate or local rock for the one step. And for this amount of underlayment for this 10 by 3 area do I buy bags at home depot or go the materials yard and get a half ton or quarert ton or what?
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Last edited by LI Sound Grunt; 04-21-2011 at 07:45 AM.
Old 04-21-2011, 06:03 AM
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The curve is easy......

Lay the entire field as you would normally. Make sure they cover almost to the edge, Then, using a block that you are going to use as a soldier course, scribe the curved cut line on the laid pavers buy holding a carpenter's pencil on one edge of the soldier block and keeping the other edge of the soldier block on the edge of the curve and drag it from one end of the sidewalk to the other. Cut on the line with a demo-saw with a masonry blade. A garden hose pouring water helps control the dust.

Then lay the soldier course. Every so often you will have to cut a wedge piece for the soldier course.

If you are not going to lay a soldier course, lay the sidewalk a little wider than you want the finished sidewalk to be. Use a garden hose to lay-out where you want the edge to be. Use a marker or carpenter's pencil to scribe the line and use the demo saw to cut that line.


Either way, when you are done, pour the concrete lock on the edge and you're done. I personally don't like the Aluminum or plastic locking devices that are installed with spikes. If you pour the concrete lock correctly, you will never see it when the grass grows back in and it holds up much better than the manufactured locks.

As for under layment, I'm always a big fan of ordering materials from a yard. It'll be less expensive in the long run. BTW, when purchasing the stone dust (underlayment), don't forget you'll need some left over to spread on top of the pavers to fill the joints and 'set' them in with the tamper.

Another word on underlayment....Check to see what the manufacturer reccommends as an underlayment. I've laid pavers with stone dust many, many times with no problems, but I have run across a few manufacturers the want concrete sand as an underlayments and NO stone dust and vica-versa (sp).
Old 04-21-2011, 06:12 AM
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Does your front window have Garrett's name on it?
Old 04-21-2011, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by sixpack324 View Post
Does your front window have Garrett's name on it?
Actually it does - it says Welcome Garrett (my new grandson) - but remember the THT member from "Scotland" is Garett - one R

Our front window allways has the latest family announcements... It also has congrats to Rob and Vicki - my som just got engaged...

BTW I haven't heard from Garett in a while????
Old 04-21-2011, 06:39 AM
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Originally Posted by sixpack324 View Post
Lay the entire field as you would normally. Make sure they cover almost to the edge, Then, using a block that you are going to use as a soldier course, scribe the curved cut line on the laid pavers buy holding a carpenter's pencil on one edge of the soldier block and keeping the other edge of the soldier block on the edge of the curve and drag it from one end of the sidewalk to the other.).
Sixpack nailed it. Note for your curve, get some 1/2" PVC pipe or conduit, bend it to shape and use that to "draw" the curve.

Note that you really do have to do all of the above (concrete saw, cement border, leveling sand, etc, etc) to get it right. By the time you go through all that hassle (especially if you have to rent a saw) it might be worthwhile to pay somebody $200 to come to do it on the side.

I can do just about anything around the house, but those paver guys are good and will knock a job like that out in about 2 hours.

Last edited by Flot; 04-21-2011 at 06:58 AM.
Old 04-21-2011, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by sixpack324 View Post
The curve is easy......

Lay the entire field as you would normally. Make sure they cover almost to the edge, Then, using a block that you are going to use as a soldier course, scribe the curved cut line on the laid pavers buy holding a carpenter's pencil on one edge of the soldier block and keeping the other edge of the soldier block on the edge of the curve and drag it from one end of the sidewalk to the other. Cut on the line with a demo-saw with a masonry blade. A garden hose pouring water helps control the dust.

Then lay the soldier course. Every so often you will have to cut a wedge piece for the soldier course.

If you are not going to lay a soldier course, lay the sidewalk a little wider than you want the finished sidewalk to be. Use a garden hose to lay-out where you want the edge to be. Use a marker or carpenter's pencil to scribe the line and use the demo saw to cut that line.


Either way, when you are done, pour the concrete lock on the edge and you're done. I personally don't like the Aluminum or plastic locking devices that are installed with spikes. If you pour the concrete lock correctly, you will never see it when the grass grows back in and it holds up much better than the manufactured locks.

As for under layment, I'm always a big fan of ordering materials from a yard. It'll be less expensive in the long run. BTW, when purchasing the stone dust (underlayment), don't forget you'll need some left over to spread on top of the pavers to fill the joints and 'set' them in with the tamper.

Another word on underlayment....Check to see what the manufacturer reccommends as an underlayment. I've laid pavers with stone dust many, many times with no problems, but I have run across a few manufacturers the want concrete sand as an underlayments and NO stone dust and vica-versa (sp).
Thanks - I think I just changed course on this -my daughter just called and remnded that when we I built her deck - they took up lots of slate patio pieces so I am thinking of reusing them - would I use that stone dust or sand for that? and how about in between the slabs? We do have slate in other places and it would fit in well even though that part of the house has a brick front.
Old 04-21-2011, 07:07 AM
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Anytime I've set slate patios or walkways, I set it in concrete, not stone dust. It doesn't sound like that's the same application you're talking about though.

How were the other areas that you have that are slate done? You could always pull up one piece and investigate...

I'm sure someone will chime in soon with advice on this application.
Old 04-21-2011, 07:42 AM
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Originally Posted by sixpack324 View Post
Anytime I've set slate patios or walkways, I set it in concrete, not stone dust. It doesn't sound like that's the same application you're talking about though.

How were the other areas that you have that are slate done? You could always pull up one piece and investigate...

I'm sure someone will chime in soon with advice on this application.
Its just over gravel or sand and all grown over with grass - an old "patio area. But, yes I agree - concrete base is probably the way to go if I don't use the pavers.
Old 04-21-2011, 09:55 PM
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My son will be redoing his front steps in the near future.

I searched the web and found this picture. Looks doable by a old retired person who has nothing better to do between fishing trips.
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Old 04-22-2011, 05:18 AM
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Thanks all...I liked this but with bluestone and gray pepples or rocks - wondering how you keep the rocks down - is there any synthetic materials to sorta hold all in place - I see Lowes has some final product in a lidded bucket (like driveway sealer) that you spread between the pavers - maybe that would do.. Ok now I remember - Polymer sand? Anyone use the stuff? Picture this with gray pepples and bluestone or slate). The pavers with alternate gray and colonial red brick would be second choice - gotta chose today
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here is what I found on the internet on Polymeric sand

Even with that long list of positives, one of the most important wasn't even mentioned; greater durability of the pavement when polymeric sand is used. With polymeric sand in place in a bluestone or brick patio or pathway, water has less opportunity to seep below the hard wearing surface of the pavement (brick or stone in this case) and into the sand and/or crushed stone below. Without water beneath the pavement, silt and fines have no ability to migrate from one area to another, and the drier base and subbase are less likely to deform under traffic loads because water, the Great Lubricator, is nowhere to be found. This means your brick paver patio or flagstone walkway look perfect longer when polymeric sand is used to fill the joints.

So maybe this would help the pepples or small stones stay in place too...

Last edited by LI Sound Grunt; 04-22-2011 at 05:33 AM.
Old 04-22-2011, 05:46 AM
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I had several walkways of brick. The base is the key to keeping everything in place. When installing, think about shoveling snow. My driveway (4 cars wide) was a pea stone with Belgium block edging, not good for my snow blower.
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Old 04-22-2011, 06:16 AM
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Originally Posted by davedowneast View Post
I had several walkways of brick. The base is the key to keeping everything in place. When installing, think about shoveling snow. My driveway (4 cars wide) was a pea stone with Belgium block edging, not good for my snow blower.
Good point - I usually do this small area by hand..
Old 04-22-2011, 06:58 AM
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Originally Posted by LI Sound Grunt View Post
Good point - I usually do this small area by hand..
Even though you're going to do it by hand, the open joints with pebbles in them are going to make it very frustrating to shovel....

Good call on the snow removal Dave!!
Old 04-22-2011, 07:40 AM
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Have you decided to use the recycled slate patio pieces?

Can you post photoes of those?

Are they all the same thickness?

I have done many front entry walks and steps.

From your photoes, you have an opportunity to eliminate that wimpy little step by raising the walk and feathering it into lawn and beds with topsoil AND reducing the need to excavate existing soil for the base.

My goal would be to do this properly one time. Not alot of square footage here so paver cost is not high.

Also, add a 2" pvc sleeve under walk for future access needs. (Lighting and or sprinklers.
Old 04-22-2011, 07:40 AM
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Even my wood decks were a pain because nails would pop up. One deck was 44' long and I would shovel the whole thing. It was no big deal to shovel because it was a couple of feet off the ground. The plastic shovel would slide right along till it hit one of those nail, just about tear out my shoulder. One summer, I took up the whole deck, flipped each board and screwed it down. Not only did I solve the nail problem, it looked like a new deck when I was done.

You will hate the stones when hand shoveling!
Old 04-22-2011, 07:44 AM
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Gotta helper?

Pick up truck?
Old 04-22-2011, 07:49 AM
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I realize it's alot more work, but lots of my past clients would also go for gluing pavers/bricks to the concrete porch. (Including facia).

Try to keep your riser heights for steps at 7".
Old 04-22-2011, 08:50 AM
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Originally Posted by cedarholm View Post

From your photoes, you have an opportunity to eliminate that wimpy little step by raising the walk and feathering it into lawn and beds with topsoil AND reducing the need to excavate existing soil for the base.

My goal would be to do this properly one time. Not alot of square footage here so paver cost is not high.

Also, add a 2" pvc sleeve under walk for future access needs. (Lighting and or sprinklers.
I just went back and looked at your original photos, cedarholm makes a good point. You really should change the whole entry, including the step(s).
Old 04-22-2011, 09:02 AM
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With the old surface and step surface it was a 7.5 in. step. I don't want to raise the whole front or any part of it to eliminate steps. Yep have truck and helper. Also just got the slate so I am gonna do something with that - the (free) slate pieces are a nice variety of muted blue brown red gray shades. Many more than I thought and And a good variety of shapes and sizes so I can minimize spacing. Will probably just get a peice of cut slate for that one step or go back to the large square bolder I used when we first moved in. - gonna see how this looks first..Thanks
Old 04-22-2011, 09:15 AM
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FYI, the step into my shop/garage/office in my oversized pic is a slab of granite that I split off of a bigger rock. Here's a better view......
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