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Anyone own a Sony NEX-3 Digital Camera?

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Anyone own a Sony NEX-3 Digital Camera?

Old 10-25-2010, 03:21 AM
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Default Anyone own a Sony NEX-3 Digital Camera?

Wife and I are expecting our first child come May. Well, she wants a GOOD digital camera, one that takes fast, quality pictures. So, this morning, after doing some research, I've decided on buying the Sony NEX-3 camera, with an additional lense. Does anyone currently have one, or know someone who does? Looking for any real world reviews on it. I think it's good, because it works like a point and shoot, but has the quality of a DLR, not to mention, cheaper than a big camera, plus shoot HD video.

Thanks for the help
Old 10-25-2010, 05:56 AM
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Do you not want to go with a DSLR because of the size? A Nikon D5000 will be similar in price but give you better performance in every aspect. Plus it'll give you the options of an amazing assortment of lenses and flash units and not force you into proprietary Sony crap..
The NEX looks like a pretty descent camera.. But it still not an SLR.
Old 10-25-2010, 07:02 AM
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From the research I've done the hd video on entry level dslr (<$1000.00) is not all that, and across all brands. You'll probably wind up with a video recorder any way. I ditto Pauly on lens/flash attachments. Can't decide on the Nikon d5000 or just shove all the money to the other side of the table and get the Nikon d90. I like the quick button features on the camera back. Keep in mind with a baby comes diaper bags, formula bags, strollers, blankies ans so on. Are you prepared to cart a camera bag too? All I'm saying is don't throw away your pocket sized digital camera.
Old 10-25-2010, 07:08 AM
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If you want to take good pictures with a good camera, nothing is going to beat an SLR. Period. It really is that simple. The CCD on a point and shoot camera is a sensor that is smaller than your fingernail. The sensor on even an entry level SLR is a full APS-C size sensor. This makes a huge difference. The size of the sensor and quality of the glass are FAR MORE IMPORTANT than megapixel count.

The reason people compare megapixels is because it's an easy number for consumers to understand, and most point & shoot have the same tiny CCD so there's no need to mention it.

In terms of beginner SLR cameras, the best two are Nikon and Canon. There are numerous differences between the two, but a lot of it is personal preference.

Non SLR cameras don't have the same quality as an SLR. Even Sony still has to obey the laws of physics. I would rather have pictures from an older 7 megapixel SLR than the most expensive 18 megapixel non SLR you can find.

I'm partial to Canon because I have a Canon Digital Rebel T2i, but the suggestion above for a D5000 is a good one.

We have a web site (hosted from my basement) that has every picture we have ever taken from when our daughter was born. I moved up to a better camera (DSLR) at the end of last year, and there is a huge difference in the quality. I wish I had done it sooner.

The plan was to use the big camera for some events and just slip the little point & shoot in my pocket when on the go, but now we use only the SLR. Yes it's bigger and slightly less convenient, but the pictures are so much better it's worth it. We only use one lens, and a kit lens at that. I have a bag that is barely big enough for the camera with the 18-55 lens attached, and a spare battery in the side pocket. I love that it turns on instantly, takes really good 1080 video, and doesn't have the huge time lag between shots, as long as you aren't waiting for the flash.

When the camera is in automatic mode, it works just like a point & shoot, only better and faster. It does take a little getting used to using a viewfinder again instead of the lcd, but now I'd never go back.

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Old 10-25-2010, 07:09 AM
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Having bought every high end camera, video recorder when my kids were born here are my thoughts.
Get a good "small" camera for outings, that can take pics and also video, because lugging a large camera bag full of lens around disney world is a huge pain in the a$$! Trust me I know. Second, trying to find somewhere to change lens with out dropping them. Also trying to switch between the camera and the video camera is a pain also.

Then later on, if the budget allows maybe get a higher end camera for the times that it makes sense to take really good pics, and also maybe for scenic stuff.

But once the kids start moving around getting them to pose for the perfect pic becomes a challenge in its self.
Old 10-25-2010, 07:42 AM
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The NEX with a zoom lens attached won't take up all that much less room than a D5000. If you want a compact camera check out the Canon S95 (or S90) or the Panasonic LX5 (or LX3). Both are really small and have nice FAST zoom lenses built in.
True with the megapixels. I shoot wedding/events/portraits as a part time gig and use a D700 and a 5 year old D70 (6mp).
Old 10-25-2010, 09:01 AM
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The best source for camera information

Where the NEXs really impress is the PASM modes where you can take full advantage of the large, very capable sensor. The feature sets are impressive, as are the NEX's portability and flexibility. They don't render the DSLR obsolete by any means, but they present one of the most compelling options for someone wanting DSLR image quality without the bulk.

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/SonyNex5Nex3/
Old 10-25-2010, 11:48 AM
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Originally Posted by bellsisland View Post
Having bought every high end camera, video recorder when my kids were born here are my thoughts.
Get a good "small" camera for outings, that can take pics and also video, because lugging a large camera bag full of lens around disney world is a huge pain in the a$$! Trust me I know. Second, trying to find somewhere to change lens with out dropping them. Also trying to switch between the camera and the video camera is a pain also.

Then later on, if the budget allows maybe get a higher end camera for the times that it makes sense to take really good pics, and also maybe for scenic stuff.

But once the kids start moving around getting them to pose for the perfect pic becomes a challenge in its self.
I had the opposite experience. I started taking baby pics with a small camera, and now have lugged a big camera all around Disney! One change, though, is I only kept one small lens on it, and had a bag that just barely fit the camera. This was easier than lugging a Cadillac size bag with two extra lenses and spare room for the kitchen sink. I had all intentions of bringing the small camera for most stuff, but gradually I ended up bringing teh big camera to everything.

Switching from camera to video was easy - I turn the wheel from "auto" to "video" and then hit the record button. This obviously depends on the camera.

You're right on the perfect pic part - my kid never stays still!
Old 10-25-2010, 01:08 PM
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I'm a die hard SLR user now. I got so sick of the lag with other compact digital cameras.

The NEX-3 actually doesn't look that bad though. You have the ability to switch lenses and it has an APS-C sensor. ISO performance looks pretty good also.

I'd still go with an SLR though :D
Old 10-26-2010, 07:20 PM
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There seem to be some knowledgeable people here, so I thought I would reword the question a bit:

Camera use is general pictures of family, including kids playing sports indoors and out, boating, dogs, etc. In other words, most of the pictures are not staged and require a quick shot. Some wide angle, some zoom, some outdoors, some indoors.

It is clear that a DSLR is the best way to go, with a zoom lens. However, you are going to get $1,500 or $2,000 or more into a decent setup, plus a steep learning curve.

Thus, the question is whether there is a good alternative above the typical $200-300 point and shoot cameras and below a $1,500 DSLR/couple of lenses setup, recognizing there will be some material compromises. You need to be able to point the camera and take quick pictures or you will lose sports and other spontaneous shots of kids and pets. It would be nice to take quick follow up shots.

Superzoom cameras like the Canon Powershot SX20 IS or the Nikon Coolpix P100 or the Panasonic Lunix DMC-FZ35 (latter seems most recommended) seem like they might be a reasonable compromise to a DSLR. It seems like you will give up the ability to do much distance shooting indoors. Do they take a picture quickly and follow ups quickly?

How about something like the Nikon Coolpix 7000, Canon Powershot G11, or Palasonic LX5? Capable of quick shots and decent zoom?
Old 10-27-2010, 08:10 AM
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I think what people are missing on this thread is that there is there is no need to for digital cameras to have a single lens reflex (SLR) design. SLR's where great/are great because they allow the user to see the same image through the view finder that the lens sees. Hence the penta prisims and mirrors which give all SLR's their distinctive look.


With digital there is no need for a penta prism or mirror. Lens can direct the image directly onto the sensor, and the image can be displayed in an electronic view finders (EVF) making a smaller more compact camera. Digital cameras can have large sensors and quality interchangeable lenses without being an SLR. Some examples of these cameras are the Sony nex, the Olympus Pen, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1.


Old 10-27-2010, 09:16 AM
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Originally Posted by beber View Post
I think what people are missing on this thread is that there is there is no need to for digital cameras to have a single lens reflex (SLR) design. SLR's where great/are great because they allow the user to see the same image through the view finder that the lens sees. Hence the penta prisims and mirrors which give all SLR's their distinctive look.


With digital there is no need for a penta prism or mirror. Lens can direct the image directly onto the sensor, and the image can be displayed in an electronic view finders (EVF) making a smaller more compact camera. Digital cameras can have large sensors and quality interchangeable lenses without being an SLR. Some examples of these cameras are the Sony nex, the Olympus Pen, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1.

Try using live view in full sunlight and/or trying to keep focus on something with a shallow depth of field and let me know how it goes!

There is a reason why penta prism viewfinders still exist.
Old 10-27-2010, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by saabaadoo View Post
Try using live view in full sunlight and/or trying to keep focus on something with a shallow depth of field and let me know how it goes!

There is a reason why penta prism viewfinders still exist.
I agree that looking at the screen may be difficult, but for the EVF I don't notice a big difference. I'm no photography expert, it just a mild hobby of mine. I just think there are a lot of good options out there other than DSLR's for the "photography enthusiast".

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