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BP CEO says: "environmental impact of spill will be very modest"

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BP CEO says: "environmental impact of spill will be very modest"

Old 05-25-2010, 05:14 AM
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Default BP CEO says: "environmental impact of spill will be very modest"

By this, I guess he means he doesn't expect the oil slick to wash on the shores of mighty old England.

What a douche.
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Old 05-25-2010, 07:55 AM
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Of course it won't - they've got Ireland right there to stop it!
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Old 05-25-2010, 11:19 AM
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It will be interesting to see how this all plays out a year from now, after the passions of the moment have cooled. I for one suspect that, aside from the economic damage from business interruption, the actual long term environmental harm will not be near as great as the current hype suggests.

Time will tell. I hope and pray he is right.
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:40 PM
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BTTT



Now where is all that damned oil?



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Old 07-29-2010, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by Cat-a-holic View Post
It will be interesting to see how this all plays out a year from now, after the passions of the moment have cooled. I for one suspect that, aside from the economic damage from business interruption, the actual long term environmental harm will not be near as great as the current hype suggests.

Time will tell. I hope and pray he is right.

I'll be willing to bet BP won't pony up any more money than they have already committed to obamazz czar, Feinberg. They will litigate the hell out of claims until the claimants are deceased.
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Old 07-29-2010, 08:44 PM
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.. the actual long term environmental harm will not be near as great as the current hype suggests.

The Eco-Whackers must be apoplectic at the thought of the leak NOT causing the world as we know it to come to an end ...
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:44 AM
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http://news.yahoo.com/s/ynews_excl/ynews_excl_sc3270

Interesting article about the oil spill and where the oil is.
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Schmaltz~Herring View Post
I'll be willing to bet BP won't pony up any more money than they have already committed to obamazz czar, Feinberg. They will litigate the hell out of claims until the claimants are deceased.
Don't you mean they will, because of responsibility to owners/shareholders, defend themselves against plaintiff attorneys and other shakedown artists?(aka governments)

Afterall, why should the "cost" of the spill be 30-50% more because of these ambulance chasers? How much good will that do to the "environment?"
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Old 07-30-2010, 08:38 AM
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The news here now seems to have people trying to find damage in the swamps and beaches and slicks and seem to be having a hard time finding the oil? Is that what is being reported in the gulf too?

Hopefully it will be a lot less than predicted and mostly economic damage. What is going on Gulf THTrs?
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Old 07-30-2010, 08:50 AM
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Millions of gallons of oil just didn't disappear. Even if it's dispersed into a more invisible form or embedded at the bottom of the ocean, expect it to cause serious damage to the Gulf's ecosystem for decades ahead.

But, make no mistake: BP is well-positioned, legally, with this news. BP no doubt dumped more chemical dispersant than we'll ever know -- or they'll ever admit. Basically, BP's mission is to "hide the body" -- and, with this task, they seem to be succeeding at this point.
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:06 AM
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I have advocated and defended offshore drilling for some time and I still do. Off of Florida, and whereever else there is oil. Right after the BP spill, somebody on the FS Forum pulled up some of my old posts on the subject to challenge my thinking.

My reply from 8 weeks ago:


I still stand by everything I wrote. There are over 5,000 wells operating in the gulf alone, about 600 as deep or deeper than the BP well, for decades, and hardly a drop ever spilled prior to now. What that tells me is that a whole lot of folks in the industry have done a whole lot right for a long time. The entire industry will learn from this accident, which is unprecedented in many ways.

This is a terrible accident no doubt, and it will cost BP big time, as it should, but we are a long way from really knowing the environmental impact. Do not underestimate the compulsion of newscasters and politicians to characterize this as the worst ecological disaster in the history of the universe. It could turn out to be as bad as that......or not. There have been other spills, and what we know is that nature recovers over time. The 1979 spill was many orders of magnitude greater. What is the impact today? There was one off the Texas coast years ago--what is the status of that oil damage? There is a place on the coast of California where there is a natural seep of crude oil into the Pacific at the rate of over thousands of gallons annually. In fact, by a large margin, most of the oil that ever gets into the ocean, gets there from natural processes.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mKHYOVRoL3E

That of course does not diminish the real hardship caused to the LA & ALA coast from business interruption, which is causing acute economic harm, and damage claims, but we still need to keep the entire event in perspective.

Maybe while we are contemplating that we should also consider that nature will NEVER recover from the damage done to pristine areas by people, like most of us here, who want to build nice seaside vacation homes, excavate canals, destroy natural coastal vegetation and wildlife habitat, all just so they can indulge their hobbies. It will never recover that is, as long as we humans insist on enjoying life as we do. Our right to that enjoyment is not more important than supplying the rest of the country and the world with energy.


http://forums.floridasportsman.com/f...shore-drilling
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Old 07-30-2010, 09:12 AM
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I disagree, redsox. The conditions are vastly different from the Exxon Valdez incident.

oil does disappear..there are microbes that eat the stuff. The waters are warm and well mixed, so the end result is more of a slick than inches thick gooey material.

There is NO doubt that there is damage from the release. However, on a global scale, this incident is literally a drop in the bucket..or a drop in a swimming pool.

No, I don't condone BP's handling of the situation, but I am very impressed with the final results..what an amazing solution, and at depths and pressures that defy comprehension.
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Old 07-30-2010, 11:27 AM
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I spent 3 weeks last month running out of Venice to look for and rescue oiled sea turtles from 20-60 miles offshore. We were looking for weedlines, rips, and other convergence zones where these small pelagic phase turtles congregate. The same forces that cause the weedlines to form up also concentrate oil in the same places.

You have all seen offshore weedlines - they teem with life - crabs, shrimp, small fish, birds overhead, etc. Well these weedlines were lifeless - everything was gone, just gooey sagassum and not much else except dead and dying fish. Basically the oil has kicked the base out from under the pelagic food chain, and I have to think that is going to have a long lasting impact. Lord only knows what is going on with the benthic habitats down on the bottom, but I bet it's not good eithier.
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Old 07-30-2010, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Menzies View Post
Of course it won't - they've got Ireland right there to stop it!
Or drink it..... I mean can it be much worse than Guinness?

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Old 08-01-2010, 07:05 AM
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Originally Posted by LI Sound Grunt View Post
Or drink it..... I mean can it be much worse than Guinness?

Attachment 125011

Hey, I like Guiness. Once you've had about 6 of them, they get pretty good!
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Old 08-01-2010, 07:13 AM
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Originally Posted by billinstuart View Post
I disagree, redsox. The conditions are vastly different from the Exxon Valdez incident.

oil does disappear..there are microbes that eat the stuff. The waters are warm and well mixed, so the end result is more of a slick than inches thick gooey material.

There is NO doubt that there is damage from the release. However, on a global scale, this incident is literally a drop in the bucket..or a drop in a swimming pool.

No, I don't condone BP's handling of the situation, but I am very impressed with the final results..what an amazing solution, and at depths and pressures that defy comprehension.



agree,the Valdez oil [refined] is alot different than oil flowing from a well.neither are good but between the 2, I would much rather clean the unrefined oil
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Old 08-01-2010, 07:58 AM
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Originally Posted by LI Sound Grunt View Post
Or drink it..... I mean can it be much worse than Guinness?

Attachment 125011

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Old 08-01-2010, 09:07 AM
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This new CEO has to say anything that will help the stock climb back up. The last guy got sent to Russia after that stock lost 50% The new guy was in Russia before being the next target of the anti BP movement.
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Old 08-01-2010, 09:17 AM
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never been much of one to hit the panic alarm but this is pretty close to home for me. in my background i commercially crabfish here in southeast louisiana and i also work in a laboratory setting. in my indecision in college i first tracked through wildlife and fisheries before i decided to do something with medical science. crabfishing is what i tell everyone i really want to do, the science just give me benefits. well, i do believe BP played the cards exactly how anyone would have played in order to lessen the impact and to self persevere. the use of the dispersant is very much a calculated measure. they repeatedly over-used what the coast guard allowed and then the coast guard repeatedly turned their head(money?). in my analytical way of thinking, the breakdown products are what we will need to evaluate. things bio-accumulate and we just don't really know what will happen. it might actually dissapate, but 10 years from now, we might find out some molecular breakdown product is leading to some amino acid deficiency causing kidney failure in a statistically significant portion of the population that eat raw oyster, or crab meat, or tuna etc. just think, we really didn't stop using leaded products until the recent past. we really aren't as smart as we'd like to think about chemical and molecular dynamics when they involve biological function. so, i'm not going to panic. i'm still going to eat seafood, but it does make me think that there may be something in it that wasn't there before. i still support the drilling. heck, i need the dang gas to run my boat to check the traps i raise. i'd rather it come from US oil. i don't think BP should be able to stretch out the litigations over many years. many good people, hard working fisherman, oilmen, family businesses, are on the ropes because BP and they really need to resolve this sooner than later. i read just the other day that the fienberg account hasn't even received funding yet. it really would surprise me if BP does a 360 on that. IMO.
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Old 08-01-2010, 05:59 PM
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There is no argument that this event has devastated fisheries in a section of the gulf coast, to the extent it may take years to recover. However, since the material and conditions are different than the Valdez disaster, long term effects over a larger area will not be as severe.

I've also heard from the commercial fish guys that the dispersants and their effect on the oil may be worse than the petroleum by itself. Does it cause the oil to lose buoyancy (get denser) and sink?
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