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Any flooring guys out there, thoughts on floor

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Any flooring guys out there, thoughts on floor

Old 08-31-2009, 03:57 PM
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Default Any flooring guys out there, thoughts on floor

I have 12" 100 year old heart pine floors in my den. Where the kids play all of the time.

When we bought the house 4 years ago I had the floors re-done. The finish must have been old the guys used because for the last year or so it has been peeling up, now it has gotten out of hand.

I don't want to re-do because the kids 2 and 4 would just scratch the finish again, if it wasn't for the kids I would tear it up and re-hardwood it, but not any option with the kids.

Anyway to lightly sand it and re-finish? I am thinking about just laying lamante over it for now, and when the kids get older then dealing with it the right way. Lumber liquadators has some cheap lamanate this weekend.

What are your thoughts?
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:08 PM
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Vinyl is final!



Seriously, there must be a better solution than covering over. Maybe someone has a better poly, etc. Ask a floor renovation guru.
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:16 PM
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I'm no expert, but layed down laminate over ruined hardwood in an old home I bought. The laminate is inexpensive and surpringsly tough as long as you don't spill liquids on it. It's also very easy to install.

Gary
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:22 PM
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the method you speak of will allow you to remove the laminate one day and still refinish the existing hardwood. ..good luck.. dave
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:23 PM
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Most of the rental places have a large vibrating sander like a giant palm sander. I would say you need about a 60 grit paper to take off the old finish then 120 to clean it up a bit. Ive done 6 of our rental's floors this year and have been very happy with the Minwax polyurethane from Lowes. I used the satin on one and while it looks very nice it didnt do the oak justice. Go with the semi gloss or full gloss if your floors are really nice. The semi gloss hides little marks and scratches a little better, less reflection so they dont pop out at you as much. Good luck its real easy to do yourself, just stay away from the drum sanders unless your floors are really gnarly.

If you want to go with laminate I have a contact here in Charlotte that has top quality lams for less than a buck a square foot hes a wholesaler for the construction industry as well as buying leftover lots in bulk, like 50-60,000 square feet at a time.
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:27 PM
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Most true heart pine flooring is not 12" wide..must be remilled flooring. In any case, NEVER wax heart pine. The traditional finish for years was moisture cured urethane. A Pergo type floor is a great interim solution. Avoid anything that will trap moisture or stick to the heart pine.

Don't destroy the heart pine..they ain't making no mo' of it!
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:29 PM
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The reason I am thinking about covering is even though these old floors are nice they have shrunk and have gaps, when the idiot that put the bad finish down, he also filled the gaps, a lot of the filler is coming out as well. So if it wasn't for the kids I would just rip it up and go with new, but the kids would scratch up the new real hardwood.
I just read online I might be able to just screen it and then re-finish which sounds pretty economical.
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:36 PM
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It's not unheard of to remove the flooring, clean and and remachine the edges, and reinstall it. If it's true flooring it has a flooring matched Tongue and Groove edge. Most heart pine flooring was 5/4 material, nailed through the tongue. However, originally the flooring was laid first, and non-load bearing walls were built on top of it.
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:36 PM
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Here are some pics
Attached Images     
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:41 PM
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I believe the problem with the peeling is that the floor had been waxed and it is not sticking. They probably used Murphy's Oil soap or something and it was not totally removed. Sounds to me it needs to be re-sanded and finished again to get to a clean surface. If you care to save yourself a ton of money on new, go to my website and you can purchase direct from the manufacturer.
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Old 08-31-2009, 04:44 PM
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The floor was totally sand with a drum sander before finish was applied, so I know it wasn't wax. He used a water based and I think it just seperated before he applied it.
This is the funny part I called his number and his wife said he would get right back to me, after a few days I call back and the number is disconnected. I paid $2500 to have the floors re-done, it hurts to have to pay it out again.
Oh well live and learn.
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Old 08-31-2009, 09:08 PM
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For the time being I would rent a oscillating sander, sand the floor, use some wood filler to fill the voids, then apply minwax semi gloss polyurethane, oil based is the best for this type of project. Once everything is dry, buy a throw rug and cover the heavily trafficked area. This will probably take slightly longer than putting down laminate depending on how good of a craftsman you are. The result should be satisfying, this is certainly a doable job, no need to shell out 2500, I bet you can refinish yourself for about 300 - 400.
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Old 09-01-2009, 05:26 AM
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That's good looking quarter sawn heart pine. Being resinous, heart pine doesn't accept water based products well. All wood shrinks only across the grain..some floor guys would mix sawdust with glue or sealer and fill the cracks. It's only temporary. Every time you sand it you shorten the life of your antique floors. I'd vote for covering it to make it child safe.

I restored homes in Savannah for years. We had just moved in to our new home, and it was Christmas. My wife gave her brothers monster..err.."children"..a toy carpenter set. First thing they did was grab the toy hammer and beat on our heart pine floor.
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Old 09-01-2009, 05:39 AM
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Before you go and cover that flooring....place an ad on craigslist or your local Flooring Supply companies. Heart pine is Gold and people will come to your house to remove it.

The best deal would be for somebody to remove it and then install 3/4" subfloor sheets; leaving you with the perfect subfloor for whatever choice you make. Save $$, too.
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Old 09-01-2009, 05:42 AM
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I am not a flooring guy, but what about the Costco floating stuff. I have it in a rental unit, and it is bombproof. No nails, no glue, and pull it up in 7 years and redo the original when it makes sense.
I actually love older floors with their imperfections. Gives them character
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Old 09-01-2009, 06:38 AM
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Originally Posted by cjd View Post
I am not a flooring guy, but what about the Costco floating stuff. I have it in a rental unit, and it is bombproof. No nails, no glue, and pull it up in 7 years and redo the original when it makes sense.
I actually love older floors with their imperfections. Gives them character
I was thinking the same thing.....if Bell wants to cover it and not harm it, the way to go is a floating hardwood laminate system.

As for me, I like worn wood floors....it makes the house look lived in.
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Old 09-01-2009, 08:32 AM
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Use a commercial rotary buffer. Use a sanding screen instead of a scrubbing pad or a particle grit paper. It will remove all the loose poly and scuff the remaining surface so the new poly takes to it better. The floor looks like it wasn't properly cleaned prior to being surfaced, when you sand there is a ridiculous amount of fine dust. Clean the floor with a damp mopping, using spirits instead of water, much like a basketball court is damp mopped. The planks look great, they don't need to be re-sanded with a grit paper, nor do you need to fill the seams with any filler. I'd apply several coats of a quality poly with a good lambswool pad this time.

I worked on a ton of old brownstone buildings in college, most of which had original wood floors. That's how we refinished them, we only drum sanded as a last resort. Remember, they're antique. Those aren't imperfections anymore, they're "character adding features".

edit: I just noticed that the current finish is water based. You should be fine switching to an oil based poly as the old finish is completely cured by now, but I'd double check with the manufacturer of whatever new poly you choose for application specifics.

Last edited by Bo Neato; 09-01-2009 at 08:58 AM.
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Old 09-01-2009, 08:54 AM
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I also like the look of the old pine floors and years back people wood beat up new pine to give it that old used look. I would go with the floating floor and then when the kids get older decide what you want to do and get some real professionals to take a look at what you have. Two years back I put down bamboo flooring in a few rooms and our 2 year old have antiqued them well.
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Old 09-11-2009, 05:53 PM
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A friend of mine just refinished his heart mine floors. instead of using a water or oil based poly., he went with a epoxy. The epoxy finish is a lot more durable and dries very quickly, allowing multiple coats in one day.
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