Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > Dockside Chat
Reload this Page >

Any suggestions on sawing your own logs into lumber

Notices

Any suggestions on sawing your own logs into lumber

Old 08-17-2009, 11:37 AM
  #1  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Panama City Fl
Posts: 1,421
Default Any suggestions on sawing your own logs into lumber

I have quite a few 14-20" diameter oak logs that have been stacked for a few years (around 10' long) and was thinking about sawing them into large timbers for a fireplace mantle and maybe some exposed beams. How about some experience or suggestions.
BIGnUGLY is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 11:54 AM
  #2  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 3,077
Default

google up portable saw mill any in your area
TimW Texas is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 01:25 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Lafayette, La.
Posts: 3,913
Default

I just had a bunch of poplar done and it came out pretty nice. I think oak is another animal because it is so hard. Like Tim said, google and search your area and give them a call. Be sure to tell them oak. When they come to they'll tell you what to do.
Mike
beenie is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 01:32 PM
  #4  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
bsmit24's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Republic of West Florida
Posts: 17,695
Default

It has been a few years but we loaded some sinkers that we had on a trailer and brought them to the mill and they milled them for us and took their payment in lumber.

Depending on what type, seasoned/dried oak is going to be hard to cut.
bsmit24 is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 01:32 PM
  #5  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: NoneYa
Posts: 4,507
Default

If there is any green or blue lines running down the wood to be cut they won't cut it. This indicates a nail is in there somewhere. Had a huge walnut that had the dreaded streak and got nothing.
Mr. Paul is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 03:03 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location:
Posts: 3,758
Default

Most mills will run a metal detector over the butts and might still cut a partical or if you are willing to pay for teeth They might even wait till they neeh to do some work to the blade then run your logs last thing before a change or grind. The logs migth be junk also if the been laying around to long.
boatmanalso is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 06:19 PM
  #7  
pjc
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: central fla
Posts: 1,157
Default

Depends on what type of oak and the sawyer. If its live oak he probably won't want to mess with it. Water oak tends to do a lot of warping. Red oak is real pretty if quarter sawn.
If you have use for it go for it but I wouldn't saw it up just to do so, it'll wind up rotting or you'll have to deal with storing it properly. If its good oak a sawyer may even pay you a little for it.
pjc is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 07:54 PM
  #8  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 439
Default

We use a Wood Mizer bandsaw type mill on Maple, so if you can find a Wood Mizer owner, go for it. Plus of the Mizer is it can be towed behind a pickup. A metal detector is a requirement, most sawmillers use one.

Disadvantage of logs stored a few years is fungus, mold and rot. Might have a bunch of firewood! If the logs are stored outdoors, they will not be dry in the interior. Sometimes you can get some good mold stained (spalted) wood this way. And logs stored this way tend to check and split.

We always sawmill the logs as soon as possible, then stack the rough cut lumber on stickers for ventilation, under good cover so it will not get rained on. A well ventilated shed, with sides (walls) is best.

You are 2 to 3 years or more to air dry rough cut green wood, more time depending on your relative humidity. I cure walnut and maple for 7 to 10 years, these are 3 inch slabs for gunstock blanks.
Altamaha is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 08:21 PM
  #9  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: Central New Jersey
Posts: 3,483
Default

Originally Posted by BIGnUGLY View Post
I have quite a few 14-20" diameter oak logs that have been stacked for a few years (around 10' long) and was thinking about sawing them into large timbers for a fireplace mantle and maybe some exposed beams. How about some experience or suggestions.
I had seen a jig that holds the chainsaw to make straight cuts on long logs, it was in a Stihl catalog a few years back.
Deep Run is offline  
Old 08-17-2009, 08:55 PM
  #10  
Senior MemberCaptains Club MemberPLEDGER
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: Cullowhee,NC,USA
Posts: 1,189
Default

I have a norwood band saw/ I built a 3200 sq ft log cabin and a 2800 sq ft post and beam cabin with it. Pine is fairly easy for a portable mill. Oak is another story. A circle mill takes a much bigger kerf but usually has a ton of horsepower driving it. I agree with altamah's comments on drying hardwoods. If there is a lumber kiln near you you can try to get them to run it for you but expect some splitting. Here I pay $0.15 per board foot for the kiln. You can also have the boards planed and tongue-n-grooved for about $.20 per board foot.
Good luck with your project. You might be able to find a used mill at www.sawmillexchange.com A used mill holds it's value very well and you could probably sell it for what you paid for it after the job. If you go that route get a mill with hydraulics like Alt's woodmizer. My milll is all manual and handling the logs will beat the heck out of you.
oneill469 is offline  
Old 08-18-2009, 11:04 AM
  #11  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Panama City Fl
Posts: 1,421
Default

Thanks guys.
BIGnUGLY is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread