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Ready to change careers

Old 08-05-2009, 11:38 AM
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Default Ready to change careers

I've been in construction/plumbing trade for the last 25 yrs. Now. at 47 I find more and more that my body is worn out from a lifetime of manual labor. I know I need some schooling but really have no clue as to which direction to go. Any suggestions?
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Old 08-05-2009, 11:57 AM
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when you figure it out let me know,I'm 45 and have been plumbing the last 20 I do feel your pain.not lately as I have no work and have been laid off for the last 3 months
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:07 PM
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sorry to hear that, unfortunatley this is a topic that comes up all to often with my union buddies "iron workers and pipe fitters" my electrician union buddies have been out of work for as long a I can remember. One of my friends just switched, after 10 years of having his own Dojo and self defense school, he got his Series 7, and is looking into financial planning ? It's tough being the US is considered a service only workplace. I've been in IT for 13 years, should have bit the bullet and went in to be a state trooper, too late for that now.
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:08 PM
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Originally Posted by nanjemoycat View Post
I've been in construction/plumbing trade for the last 25 yrs. Now. at 47 I find more and more that my body is worn out from a lifetime of manual labor. I know I need some schooling but really have no clue as to which direction to go. Any suggestions?
Depends on your financial needs. Maybe there are Private or local or State or federal Building Inspector type jobs. Or teaching at a trade school. Maybe take a construction management course or two and see if something opens up in that field.

For totally different field - Nursing or the medical technician fields seem real hot right now.

Good Luck - I hear your pain - doing anything for 25 years is tiring unless you REALLY love it.
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by LI Sound Grunt View Post
Depends on your financial needs. Maybe there are Private or local or State or federal Building Inspector type jobs. Or teaching at a trade school. Maybe take a construction management course or two and see if something opens up in that field.

For totally different field - Nursing or the medical technician fields seem real hot right now.

Good Luck - I hear your pain - doing anything for 25 years is tiring unless you REALLY love it.



I know a few county inspectors and there getting laid off next month if things don't change
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:23 PM
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Nursing.

You can get your ticket in 2 years.


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Old 08-05-2009, 12:24 PM
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test for echo


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Old 08-05-2009, 12:25 PM
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MRI technician, I've considered it myself, the pay is pretty ridiculous and well if you've had an mri you know what they do.......
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Old 08-05-2009, 12:32 PM
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It isn't really advice but my fishing buddy and I talk about this often - he does home improvement. I've been in Information Technology for a very large financial services company my whole 27 year career and quoting from the movie Office Space, "human beings were not meant to sit in little cubicles staring at computer screens all day". I have neck, back and shoulder pain from sitting hunched in front of a monitor 8-10 hours a day - I HOW I WISH I could be up and out doing something physical...I'd trade with either of you if I could!

Anyway, good luck to you.
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Old 08-05-2009, 01:16 PM
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The top paying jobs list I read the other day had 12 out of the first 15 job in fields of engineering. I think allot of people in the trades make good engineers, particularly those with allot of field experience. Unfortunitly not an easy thing to attain, but easily doable if you have the desire. I can say that the power field is in DIRE need of Electrical Engineers with a concentration in Power.
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by Snapper Head View Post
test for echo


Big Al


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j0nvbvdcClY
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:15 PM
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I have seen some guys in their 40's and 50's do quite well by outfitting a van, box truck, or trailer and going into the home handyman business. The good ones that do good work seem to instantly get more than they can handle, and can start picking and choosing the jobs they want.

I did it on Cape Cod off and on for a couple years. Learned to refer the larger construction jobs, and stick to the light stuff. If it involved building a form and pouring concrete, for example, I referred it to someone else. Even though I am totally capable of pouring slabs, framing houses, roofing, etc. the trick is to take on the light, quick jobs and fit a bunch of them in. Don't beat yourself up hauling heavy stuff around. And you don't have to. There are PLENTY of little half hour jobs that just take some expertise.

A side benefit of referring the bigger jobs to the home remodelers, etc. was that I started getting to do some of their 'punchlist' stuff on new houses. Venting dryers, flashing chimneys, light switch covers...that kind of stuff. Easy money. No education required. Just some marketing to get started.
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Freeebird View Post



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Old 08-05-2009, 02:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Snapper Head View Post
test for echo


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i was told you were not "allowed" to change "careers"
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:41 PM
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Originally Posted by cgrand View Post
i was told you were not "allowed" to change "careers"
I'm not.

The question is "where did you get information?"


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Old 08-05-2009, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by jehines3 View Post
The top paying jobs list I read the other day had 12 out of the first 15 job in fields of engineering. I think allot of people in the trades make good engineers, particularly those with allot of field experience. Unfortunitly not an easy thing to attain, but easily doable if you have the desire. I can say that the power field is in DIRE need of Electrical Engineers with a concentration in Power.
I lost my job in a RIF (mechanical engineer) but I'm currently planning to accept an offer at another company. I spent one month out of work. To tell the truth, I think it's a miracle.

SC has the 2nd highest employment in the nation; and has very little manufacturing. If you check monster.com for 'engineering' in SC you will find ~125 positions open, and believe me, many of those aren't engineering, and cover a variety of fields. On top of that, many of those jobs are 'dummy' jobs posted by recruiters looking for resumes for their databanks. I'd believe that there are at least 350-500 engineers out of work in SC, easy.

I'll have to relocate, but if I don't take this offer, I feel certain that the next offer might take 6 months to a year...

That being said, I think your advice is sound, and particularly for what you said about EE's and power background. If you have a nuclear background you are golden. Finding that experience would be the problem...
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:47 PM
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I also have pondered this very question. I have been in the construction field for 20 years now, started as a goofer and work my way up to a Superintendent. I am a carpenter by trade. I now firmly believe that i have turned into someone that I always said was out of thier F%#*!^g mind when I was working on-site. The only problem now is you get stuck in the same old rut ( subs never show, they never complete thing when they are supposed to, your guys take longer breaks and lunches when you are busy with things, material doesn't show-up on time, bugets are tight and owner always want things for free, and the worst is your body will fail you!)
The good side of the trades is that you are never at the same place for to long and you can work on your own house HA-HA.

Let me know if you find something better I might just join you.
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Snapper Head View Post
I'm not.

The question is "where did you get information?"


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kyrgyz women will tell you anything for a box of twizzlers and a ped-egg...
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:54 PM
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Originally Posted by nanjemoycat View Post
I've been in construction/plumbing trade for the last 25 yrs. Now. at 47 I find more and more that my body is worn out from a lifetime of manual labor. I know I need some schooling but really have no clue as to which direction to go. Any suggestions?
First off good luck to you. I think the hardest part of your decision is making the decision. Keep in mind two things. First, if you want to get a degree, there are many many many very good online degrees you can get from good and respected colleges. Perhaps you can still work while getting your schooling. Second, you are in a really good area for job opportunities.
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Old 08-05-2009, 02:59 PM
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Originally Posted by cgrand View Post
kyrgyz women will tell you anything for a box of twizzlers and a ped-egg...
Man, you are overpaying.

Just give em some kadchgall.

They'll never use the ped-egg.


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