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Suggestions for new Heat Pump

Old 04-12-2009, 06:36 AM
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Default Suggestions for new Heat Pump

I need a new heat pump (1.5 - 2T) for the downstairs and live in SE Virginia. I've had two vendors from Lennox out and the qoute for the same system was 3K difference. Recieved a quote from a third vendor for an American Standard and it was near the price of the higher Lennox. Qoutes included a new air handler. I am replacing a 25yo Rudd 1.5T.

I just want reliaility at a decent price. Focusing on 13-15 Seer.

Any manufacturers to stay away from?

.... any recommendations?

Thanks.
Old 04-12-2009, 07:00 AM
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american standard is the same as trane.IMHO stay away from any of the varible speed fan crap,way to much to fix if there is a problem.get a basic unit as the cost of all the fancy crap never justify's the cost.the price difference usallally takes 10 years to recoup and by then it's time to replace anyway and is outdated by then
Old 04-12-2009, 08:19 AM
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I recently read about Acadia which promises ground source efficiencies at regular heat pump price points. It might be worth looking into.
Old 04-12-2009, 10:06 AM
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Have somebody give you a quote on a Goodman...should be about 2500 installed for a new pump, handler and line if it's a basic install. Maybe even a little less. There was some discussion about this not too long ago...do a search and you can probably find it.
Old 04-12-2009, 10:19 AM
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Don't forget to check warranty period. I spent a few hundred more and got twice the warranty (10 yrs) with higher eer to boot. Warranty is parts and labor on Trane equipment.
Old 04-12-2009, 04:06 PM
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A friend of one of my co-workers had a new unit installed here in central FL. A couple of years later he wanted some warranty work done. The repair outfit ran the Sn for warranty coverage and found that the unit had been stolen in Ohio. Watch out for good deals.
Old 04-14-2009, 08:50 AM
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I am in Chesapeake Va, give me a call, if your close by I'll give you a quote
757-438-8344
Capt Todd
Old 04-14-2009, 09:01 AM
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Check which units are available for a federal income tax credit. I just had a 5 ton split system installed, and the price of the more efficient unit (SEER and the EER) was lower than the less efficient unit if you factor in the tax credit. www.energystar.gov
Old 04-14-2009, 09:07 AM
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Originally Posted by abeal2 View Post
Have somebody give you a quote on a Goodman...should be about 2500 installed for a new pump, handler and line if it's a basic install. Maybe even a little less. There was some discussion about this not too long ago...do a search and you can probably find it.
i went with a cheapo goodman unit when i turned my attic into a the master bedroom...3 years later...as soon as it wa off warranty, it crapped out.

replaced it with a carrier.

and yes, you can get tax deductions for certain models with certain efficiency ratings...look it up.
Old 04-14-2009, 08:25 PM
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Originally Posted by jking View Post
I recently read about Acadia which promises ground source efficiencies at regular heat pump price points. It might be worth looking into.
The Acadia's are geared more for the colder climates and run twin compressor's so they can still be eff in the cold climates like Canada. Availability of parts suck, so you might have to wait a few days for parts. As far as the price, your looking at double the cost if not more than the bigger name brands. Luxaire has come along way with their product lines and are the same thing as York if your looking for a big name.
Old 04-15-2009, 09:32 AM
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I deal with Trane, York, or Carrier, and if you want a cheaper unit I can get any of those as well, call me, I'll give you all the facts, and you can decide for yourself 757-438-8344
Capt Todd
Old 04-17-2009, 06:47 PM
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Very happy with our Armstrong in northern Ohio; keeps us warm and doesnt cost much to run. 10 yr warranty on the compressor, 5 yrs on all else
Old 04-17-2009, 08:23 PM
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Much good and a little ill informed advice has been posted so far. . There is really not as much difference as people may think between brands of consumer HVAC equipment. For the most part, there is great similarity under the hood; you'll see the same off the shelf components. A very few, Trane for example, make more of the components in their units themselves. The so called high end systems, like Trane and to some degree Lennox, generally have nicer built cabinets and more standard features, but most others are perfectly serviceable too. One unit I do not recommend for a number of reasons is Rheem / Rudd. Trane and Lennox are very good. Carrier / Bryant, York, and Goodman are all good. There are many others.

The efficiency of the unit you buy will be determined by the combination of outside unit and air handler installed. There is a lot of hype out there designed to confuse the consumer. You can cut through it by insisting upon a few things. Insist your outside unit have a scroll type of compressor, and be rated SEER 14. This is only about $50-100 more than a SEER 13 unit. Next, insist the air handler have a TXV valve, which is a more efficient device for cntrolling the flow of refrigerant through your system. Insist on a new line set. The tubing size on your ancient one is almost certain to be too small for the new high efficiency system. Next, ask your installer to show you the ARI ratings for the combination of outside unit and air handler he is proposing. This will be in specifications from the manufacturer, not a glossy brochure. Make note of the SEER rating (cooling efficiency), and HSPF (heating efficiency). Higher numbers are better. You will see that a SEER 14 outside unit may actually achieve a SEER 15 rating if a large enough air handler is proposed. Also have him show you the db specification (sound level) of the outside unit. Smaller number is better. Use these specifications to compare your proposals, along with warranty. More expensive does not always mean better warranty. For example Goodman systems have 10 year warranty on all parts, and some have a lifetime compressor warranty....a much better warranty than many more expensive systems. Keep in mind that these better choices are reasonable in price, unless the contractor is taking you for a ride. A TXV is around $100, upgrading from SEER 13 to SEER 14 outside unit, $100 or so, a larger air handler, $50-100.

Absolutely insist your contractor's proposal includes hooking up both the primary and back-up drain line for your air handler's drip pan. This is not required in may localities if the unit is not installed over a finished area, or it may not be required if an overflow pan is installed. But if the primary drain line becomes clogged with lint (and they do with regularity), the pan will overflow and saturate the insulation inside the air handler. This will ruin the unit in short order with corrosion and mold. An external overflow pan is NO SUBSTITUTE for connecting up both of the air handler drain lines! Last, insist the outside unit include a hard start device. Any system with a TXV valve must have one to assure the unit starts properly on cold winter days.

One more thing...have the contractor show you evidence that his system as proposed will quality you for a Federal energy tax credit. A system that meets the guidelines above should qualify.

A contractor who thinks the above is unheard of or crazy..my advice is to walk.
Old 04-19-2009, 06:33 AM
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Thanks all, sorry for the delay. FT work and FT college keeps me pretty busy.

itwonder, thanks for the detailed information, exactly what I was looking for.

Capt Todd, I'll give you a call tomorrow...I'm located upper NN.


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