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Chimney: Concrete or Steel?

Old 03-09-2009, 07:23 PM
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Default Chimney: Concrete or Steel?

Looking to build a chimney, a mason quoted $3k for pouring a footing, boring a whole in the foundation, and a stack 20'-25'. The double wall lined chimney pipe @$65 per 3' sections and mounting brackets, all stainless steal. But the problem is my house is under a 1/2 a mile from the beach, the salt water. I am worried that with in 5 years the pipe will fall apart then require replacing.

Anyone one using something like the metal chimney ?
Old 03-10-2009, 02:28 AM
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Why can't you use a clay tile liner? ;?
Old 03-10-2009, 03:42 AM
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SS double wall here.
Why do you need double inside chimney? SS liner would do good.
Old 03-10-2009, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by bornfishing View Post
SS double wall here.
Why do you need double inside chimney? SS liner would do good.

I am looking at the options, Concrete w/the tile flue liners, permits, appeals and inspections $3000, SS double wall under $1000 with fabrication a coupler, (threw foundation fitting.) I did not mean double lined, just the regular double wall tubing. How is your SS setup holding up?
Old 03-10-2009, 06:32 AM
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How would the SS look on your house? Often the masonary stuff read brick here -looks classier - just my opinion. I would make my decision on asthetics and probably go with the masonary product - especially if you can see it from the street.
Old 03-10-2009, 07:30 AM
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What is venting into the chimney? Gas or oil fired heating appliance or wood stove???
Old 03-10-2009, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by s_ebels View Post
What is venting into the chimney? Gas or oil fired heating appliance or wood stove???

I have an oil furnace and currently a power vent that's falling a part and keeps breaking down on really cold days, but not this winter (knock on wood,) it's about 20 years old now.

I know the Masonry chimney looks classier but its the price, I priced out 16.5" chimney blocks at $80 a piece, but need the flue liners and a pored concrete footing plus a clean out box for ash. If I go this route I will be in for $900 in permits, appeals, surveys, and inspections. My town is not making this easy for me. I am already $300 in for permit application fee's. My Bro in law is a mason and could of got the job done for the materials, a bunch of fishing trips, and cases of beer, but he went nuts and ran off to the Mid West so I am screwed with that deal. Last I heard he wanted to be a bail enforcement agent, so I call him Brain Dead the Bounty Hunter.

Last edited by aloop; 03-10-2009 at 01:28 PM.
Old 03-11-2009, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by aloop View Post
I have an oil furnace and currently a power vent that's falling a part and keeps breaking down on really cold days, but not this winter (knock on wood,) it's about 20 years old now.

I know the Masonry chimney looks classier but its the price, I priced out 16.5" chimney blocks at $80 a piece, but need the flue liners and a pored concrete footing plus a clean out box for ash. If I go this route I will be in for $900 in permits, appeals, surveys, and inspections. My town is not making this easy for me. I am already $300 in for permit application fee's. My Bro in law is a mason and could of got the job done for the materials, a bunch of fishing trips, and cases of beer, but he went nuts and ran off to the Mid West so I am screwed with that deal. Last I heard he wanted to be a bail enforcement agent, so I call him Brain Dead the Bounty Hunter.
I feel your pain on the permits. Seems the main focus of them is revenue stream for the issuing authority not public safety and uniform construction methods these days.

If looks are a concern you can't beat a nice brick chimney that's for sure. However, even if I were to put up one myself, I'd still drop a single wall stainless liner in it. We do that as a matter of standard practice when we are installing a new oil furnace or boiler. The reason being that the new equipment and burners are so efficient that you can get flue gas condensation in the chimney, especially if it's on the exterior of the house. The moisture from the condensation will seep into the block or brick and ruin it within a couple years. Many of the boilers especially will have flue gas temps in the 300-350* range and when exposed to a nice cold peice of cement will rapidly drop to the dew point of the flue gas. It will rain inside the chimney and destroy mortar and block.
Old 03-11-2009, 07:27 PM
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WOW, I never knew about flue gases. Does it react to SS causing a quicker deterioration in the metal. I am thinking of just using the double wall pipe without the Earthen materials (bricks or blocks) just because of the cost and the fact I can install it in one day without permits. My wife and I are expecting our first baby in a couple months so cost is an issue. The setup with the power vent prevents us from opening the windows if the furnace is heating up water, after 5 years if this it sucks!
Old 03-11-2009, 08:03 PM
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Originally Posted by aloop View Post
WOW, I never knew about flue gases. Does it react to SS causing a quicker deterioration in the metal. I am thinking of just using the double wall pipe without the Earthen materials (bricks or blocks) just because of the cost and the fact I can install it in one day without permits. My wife and I are expecting our first baby in a couple months so cost is an issue. The setup with the power vent prevents us from opening the windows if the furnace is heating up water, after 5 years if this it sucks!
The flue gas will not react with the stainless. That's what those products are designed to handle.

Maybe a good option at this point would be to erect an insulated double wall flue with a product like Selkirk-Metalbestos or Security and then at a later date if desired you could have a chase built around it for the sake of cosmetics. The chase could match your siding or be done with fake brick or stone...whatever you would want.

I avoid power vents like the plague. Costly to repair always in need of adjustment. You are on the right track in ditching the thing.
Old 03-12-2009, 05:28 AM
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Everytime I hear the power vent squeal a bit I get worried! Thanks for the advice!
Old 03-12-2009, 05:41 AM
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My neighbor is using the S/S double wall for a woodstove he put in his basement. This is his 2nd or 3rd winter. The only problem he had was he needed to add an extra section because the top had been just below the peak level of his roof. He thought that was interfering with his draw since the wind here normally blows over the roof before the tube.

Hope this helps. Good luck!
Old 03-12-2009, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Kamper View Post
My neighbor is using the S/S double wall for a woodstove he put in his basement. This is his 2nd or 3rd winter. The only problem he had was he needed to add an extra section because the top had been just below the peak level of his roof. He thought that was interfering with his draw since the wind here normally blows over the roof before the tube.

Hope this helps. Good luck!
Code is 2' above any part of the roof within 10'.
Old 03-12-2009, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by s_ebels View Post
Code is 2' ...
"Code" varies widely by location but I have no idea if he checked first.
Old 03-12-2009, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Kamper View Post
"Code" varies widely by location but I have no idea if he checked first.
If I'm not mistaken that comes from the NFPA section dealing with chimneys and vents and is national in scope. Local codes can exceed it but the NFPA is minimum in nearly all cases. That criteria is good practice in any event. You won't have any draft problems when adhering to that unless there are really weird circumstances present at the location.
Old 03-12-2009, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by s_ebels View Post
.. NFPA is minimum ...
Cool.
Old 03-12-2009, 10:20 AM
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...and remove any hanging branches within 15-20' because it can create a down draft.
Old 03-12-2009, 01:53 PM
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We've got an Isokern fireplace that puts out some serious heat.
Old 03-13-2009, 07:09 PM
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any codes to obey to?
Old 03-14-2009, 07:01 PM
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Build it quick. The Mass. bureaucracy will soon tell you that you can't use it.

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