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Gun collectors

Old 10-01-2007, 09:41 PM
  #1  
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Default Gun collectors

I have recently inheirted serveral shot guns. A Winchester Model 1897 12gauge built in 1907, a Winchester Model 1912 12gauge, a few ones that can't be shot any more, and my favortie a Browning Belgian made 20 gauge auto gold trigger. My problem is I need to know the age to know the value; I have the serial 1 Z 51553. I need to know the values to get a insurance policey for them.

Thanks
Leo
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Old 10-02-2007, 08:48 AM
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Default Re: Gun collectors

Search for the mfgs website or a club affiliated with the gun you are looking for info on or buy the Blue Book of Gun Values if you are good at determining gun condition. If memory serves, Gulf Breeze has a pretty knowledgeable gun shop owner in your area. As far as value is concerned in the more common guns, condition is everything...in the very rare, value can be pretty high even for a gun in bad shape. Good luck, Frank
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Old 10-02-2007, 09:09 AM
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Default RE: Gun collectors

I think I am correct in that you can go to the Browning web site and they have the serial numbers there that will tell you the age of the gun.

I would also check some of the online gun auction sites and see what they are going for.

Typically a Belgium Browning will sell for between 500-1000.00 depending on condition
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:17 AM
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Default Re: Gun collectors

Even the ones you think that you can't shoot anymore will be worth something to collectors, especially if they are doubles or quality Damascus barrels - they can probably still be shot if you want to reload your own shells.
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Old 10-03-2007, 10:09 AM
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Default RE: Gun collectors

I have a neighbor who also inherited a large collection of guns that he wishes to dispose of at fair prices.
Early Winchester bolt and lever action rifles in excellent condition, Browning Superposed shotguns, Remington Custom shop rifles, English and other European double and bolt action rifles to name just a few.
He's currently at a loss of how to sell them to collectors at a fair price, as the very few gun shops still open throughout New England simply seem to want to pay little or nothing for them, or take them on consignment for a very low price and charge a 20 to 25 % commision.
I recall there were once publications that would advertise fine firearms for sale, like Shotgun News and Gun List, but they too seem to have fallen by the wayside.
How does one sell good high quality firearms today without simply giving them away, or being taken advantage of by unscrupulous scoundrels.
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Old 10-03-2007, 10:26 AM
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Default RE: Gun collectors

Beuford T. Justice - 10/3/2007 10:09 AM

I have a neighbor who also inherited a large collection of guns that he wishes to dispose of at fair prices.
Early Winchester bolt and lever action rifles in excellent condition, Browning Superposed shotguns, Remington Custom shop rifles, English and other European double and bolt action rifles to name just a few.
He's currently at a loss of how to sell them to collectors at a fair price, as the very few gun shops still open throughout New England simply seem to want to pay little or nothing for them, or take them on consignment for a very low price and charge a 20 to 25 % commision.
I recall there were once publications that would advertise fine firearms for sale, like Shotgun News and Gun List, but they too seem to have fallen by the wayside.
How does one sell good high quality firearms today without simply giving them away, or being taken advantage of by unscrupulous scoundrels.
Tell him to buy the "Blue Book of Gun Values". It's about $35 and when dealing with higher value guns, it's worth it. He can also go on some of the following sites and see what similiar guns are going for. You may also want to find an appraiser who works for a fee just to be sure.

www.gunsamerica.com
www.gunbroker.com
www.auctionarms.com
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Old 10-03-2007, 11:55 AM
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Default RE: Gun collectors

Beuford T. Justice - 10/3/2007 10:09 AM

I have a neighbor who also inherited a large collection of guns that he wishes to dispose of at fair prices.
Early Winchester bolt and lever action rifles in excellent condition, Browning Superposed shotguns, Remington Custom shop rifles, English and other European double and bolt action rifles to name just a few.
He's currently at a loss of how to sell them to collectors at a fair price, as the very few gun shops still open throughout New England simply seem to want to pay little or nothing for them, or take them on consignment for a very low price and charge a 20 to 25 % commision.
I recall there were once publications that would advertise fine firearms for sale, like Shotgun News and Gun List, but they too seem to have fallen by the wayside.
How does one sell good high quality firearms today without simply giving them away, or being taken advantage of by unscrupulous scoundrels.
Sounds like your neighbor may be sitting on some high priced guns where it would be fairly easy for him to be taken. There are many grades of Browning Superposed shotguns, and guage will play a big factor in value as well. The smaller the guage, the more the gun will be worth. The Remington custom stuff will be hard to value as will be the case with anything custom, but they weren't cheap. Shags advice is good, but you yourself have to be sure of what you have before these books will help you very much. Some of it will be obvious, some won't. If you have any quality gun shows in your area, check them out and see if you can find guns similar to what he has. That will let you know what you can expect to get out of them in your area.
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Old 10-03-2007, 12:18 PM
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Default Re: Gun collectors

This site might help with the manufacture dates of the Winchesters (and also has a forum section):
http://armscollectors.com/sn/windates.htm


And you might find some comparable models on this site to get an idea of value:

http://www.collectorsfirearms.com/


Another forum site that might be helpful:

http://shootersforum.com/


Good luck.
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Old 10-03-2007, 03:29 PM
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Default RE: Gun collectors

TN FREEBIRD - 10/3/2007 11:55 AM

Beuford T. Justice - 10/3/2007 10:09 AM

I have a neighbor who also inherited a large collection of guns that he wishes to dispose of at fair prices.
Early Winchester bolt and lever action rifles in excellent condition, Browning Superposed shotguns, Remington Custom shop rifles, English and other European double and bolt action rifles to name just a few.
He's currently at a loss of how to sell them to collectors at a fair price, as the very few gun shops still open throughout New England simply seem to want to pay little or nothing for them, or take them on consignment for a very low price and charge a 20 to 25 % commision.
I recall there were once publications that would advertise fine firearms for sale, like Shotgun News and Gun List, but they too seem to have fallen by the wayside.
How does one sell good high quality firearms today without simply giving them away, or being taken advantage of by unscrupulous scoundrels.
Sounds like your neighbor may be sitting on some high priced guns where it would be fairly easy for him to be taken. There are many grades of Browning Superposed shotguns, and guage will play a big factor in value as well. The smaller the guage, the more the gun will be worth. The Remington custom stuff will be hard to value as will be the case with anything custom, but they weren't cheap. Shags advice is good, but you yourself have to be sure of what you have before these books will help you very much. Some of it will be obvious, some won't. If you have any quality gun shows in your area, check them out and see if you can find guns similar to what he has. That will let you know what you can expect to get out of them in your area.
Which brings up another big problem here in the very liberal Northeast. There are no longer any gun shows, as they were long ago driven from the area.

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Old 10-03-2007, 03:36 PM
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Default RE: Gun collectors

Beuford T. Justice - 10/3/2007 3:29 PM

TN FREEBIRD - 10/3/2007 11:55 AM

Beuford T. Justice - 10/3/2007 10:09 AM

I have a neighbor who also inherited a large collection of guns that he wishes to dispose of at fair prices.
Early Winchester bolt and lever action rifles in excellent condition, Browning Superposed shotguns, Remington Custom shop rifles, English and other European double and bolt action rifles to name just a few.
He's currently at a loss of how to sell them to collectors at a fair price, as the very few gun shops still open throughout New England simply seem to want to pay little or nothing for them, or take them on consignment for a very low price and charge a 20 to 25 % commision.
I recall there were once publications that would advertise fine firearms for sale, like Shotgun News and Gun List, but they too seem to have fallen by the wayside.
How does one sell good high quality firearms today without simply giving them away, or being taken advantage of by unscrupulous scoundrels.
Sounds like your neighbor may be sitting on some high priced guns where it would be fairly easy for him to be taken. There are many grades of Browning Superposed shotguns, and guage will play a big factor in value as well. The smaller the guage, the more the gun will be worth. The Remington custom stuff will be hard to value as will be the case with anything custom, but they weren't cheap. Shags advice is good, but you yourself have to be sure of what you have before these books will help you very much. Some of it will be obvious, some won't. If you have any quality gun shows in your area, check them out and see if you can find guns similar to what he has. That will let you know what you can expect to get out of them in your area.
Which brings up another big problem here in the very liberal Northeast. There are no longer any gun shows, as they were long ago driven from the area.
Yep, I kinda wondered about that.
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:23 PM
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Default Re: Gun collectors

A few years ago I had some valuable guns from an estate and wound up finding a broker on the internet who sold them for me on commission at very good prices. I would check out anyone you might find that way, but that is how I did it.
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Old 10-03-2007, 09:44 PM
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Default Re: Gun collectors

Just a humble word of advice - never post actual full serial numbers anywhere on the net. Someone else could use them to file false stolen gun reports. It's been done before.
I learned this one on several of the 'gun' boards I used to frequent.
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Old 10-03-2007, 11:37 PM
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Default Re: Gun collectors

ahh i was just about to do that cap1, anyways. why are the records for the browning guns so fuzzy?


they say: First 10,000 shipped to U.S. Marked with "BROWNING AUTOMATIC ARMS CO. OGDEN UTAH-U.S.A." Very few serial number records remain.

and

Beginning with Serial Number 1 to approximately 228,000. Exact production figures are not available. Year of manufacture on Pre-World War II production is strictly a guess.

I've got a 77,000 gun that says Browning Arms Co. Ogden Utah from my grandfather who grew up in that area. Anyone know any more thing more or would it say on browning.com if they knew?
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