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I just discovered that my new GP/primary care doctor

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I just discovered that my new GP/primary care doctor

Old 05-05-2021, 07:31 AM
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Default I just discovered that my new GP/primary care doctor

went to a for-profit medical school in the Caribbean. And I'm not sure how I feel about that.
Old 05-05-2021, 07:36 AM
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Ross??
Old 05-05-2021, 07:48 AM
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Mine went to school in India. I asked her about it. She old me that she had four additional licensing tests to take since it was an out of country school. Her passing score was also required to be higher. So basically the bar was higher for her than someone who went to school here.
Old 05-05-2021, 07:50 AM
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Where did they actually train? Most if not all practical and clinical learning is going to be done in residency, which would need to be completed by an accredited program(usually means in the US) to get licensed and practice legally. New MDs out of the Caribbean do fight an uphill battle to get into US based residency programs, so either they were a rock star or maybe had some connections. Being board certified is going to be your best superficial judgment of credentials/abilities- ABFM certified?
Old 05-05-2021, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
went to a for-profit medical school in the Caribbean. And I'm not sure how I feel about that.
Check where he/she obtained his/her internships and residency training. If you are really concerned, contact the directors of those training programs. Determine of the programs were accredited by the Professional association while the physician was training.
Finally, check to see if Board Certification has been obtained in the specialty. (Family Practice/ER Etc)

If an FMG (foreign medical grad) is successful in their post medical school training and they become Board Certified it is highly likely they are competent.
Some people are highly competent even though they do not pass their specialty board certification. Don't necessarily discount them based on board success. (Some boards are a real struggle)

You can always contact your state Board of Medicine. They can provide you any actions taken against any physician regarding any formal complaints filed. They will tell you if there are any sanctions, corrective actions, revocations of licenses etc. Much of this is obtained on line. You can do this on any physician. FMG or US/Canada trained. Canadians/Brits/South Africans are usually good as or better than US physicians.

Lastly, if the physician is in a call group, contact one of the other physicians in the call group directly. (Not the office nurse etc, but the physician. They will know if their associate is any good)

My veterinarian got his degree from Ross. He's served our pets well and I've never seen any knowledge or competency issues. Vet's standards are high or higher than physicians. (Their testing is rigorous}
I did my internship with a couple M.D. grads from Mexico. One was USA citizen (Guadalajara) and the other was native Mexican. Both were completing their second internship when I met them. FMG's had to do two internships to get a license and progress to a residency. Each was very good and became successful.



Old 05-05-2021, 08:03 AM
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Residency was a state school in the US. Yes, board certified.

I guess it's not a huge deal, right? I mean, they basically triage for referrals to specialists anyway. I was using a PA prior to this, so the new MD should be at least as good.
Old 05-05-2021, 08:04 AM
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The only way to legally practice medicine in the US is completing a residency program in the US. Tens of thousands of people attend foreign medical schools and fight for the 38k yearly residency spots in the US. I believe last year around 50k people applied for 38k spots. Nothing worse than paying for medical school and ending up looking for a new profession because you didn’t match into a residency spot.
Old 05-05-2021, 09:39 AM
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Experience over education always.

And you're talking about a GP, basically better at triage than you would be on WebMD, some fundamental understanding of medicine that you likely have, and knowledge of who the best specialists are and the ability to refer you to them.

I've worked with and for enough MBAs from Harvard on down to the University of Phoenix to know that the school the degree came from has no bearing on their effectiveness, or lack thereof, in the real world.

More important is are you and he/she on the same page about your health concerns, does the doctor treat you as a subject matter expert on you and does the doctor clearly explain the whys and hows of any procedure/process/guidance he/she offers. If no to any of these then find another doc.
Old 05-05-2021, 11:46 AM
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Wouldn't bother me a bit. I care more about their qualifications than where they graduated from. Med schools in the US are very expensive, very difficult to get accepted into. Doesn't mean the doctor is incapable. Also all this crap lately about well connected parents bribing colleges to accept their kids could lessen to some extend the validity of the fancy degrees of some.

I've met some doctors that didn't know their ass from a hole in the ground that somehow graduated from a med school stateside....
Old 05-05-2021, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
Residency was a state school in the US. Yes, board certified.

I guess it's not a huge deal, right? I mean, they basically triage for referrals to specialists anyway. I was using a PA prior to this, so the new MD should be at least as good.
I was a specialist and I go to a Family Doctor. Mine does triage and refer as you outline. Mine also keeps me up on all immunizations and the latest recommendations for this or that therapy.
In addition, He's found and discovered stuff that I was unaware of. It is impressive how stupid we all can be regarding our own bodies and health.

A good primary care physician is gold. They can also diagnose and treat and keep you from having to go to the specialist. (Mine has several times) You are wise to care and be circumspect about their training. Don't lower your expectations regarding any physician, dentist, or vet. If you find a good one that gives good service and follow up you are fortunate.
Old 05-05-2021, 01:08 PM
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My Dr. is Egyptian.... Went to Cairo U .... Been practicing for 20 years and residency at Cleveland Clinic... thats what counts...

have a few lawyer friends that went to low end schools ... they are good lawyers ... and a few Ivy league friend that dont know crap

School doesnt mean much in my opinion

Last edited by triplenet; 05-05-2021 at 01:27 PM.
Old 05-05-2021, 01:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
went to a for-profit medical school in the Caribbean. And I'm not sure how I feel about that.
I wouldn't worry about it. If you have a problem that persists for more than two weeks and you don't get any meaningful help from your GP then yeah....move on.
Old 05-05-2021, 02:17 PM
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That's why it's called practicing medicine.
Old 05-05-2021, 02:27 PM
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If he has been your doc for years and you've been comfortable with him and received good treatment I wouldn't be concerned. If there have been some things that didn't add up, misdiagnoses, etc... then this would be enough to make me move. But if everything has been good no need to leave.
Old 05-05-2021, 02:35 PM
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Originally Posted by junepoon View Post
That's why it's called practicing medicine.

Top Health Statistics

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Old 05-05-2021, 02:44 PM
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“acrophylla , Today 08:39 AM
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Experience over education always.

And you're talking about a GP, basically better at triage than you would be on WebMD, some fundamental understanding of medicine that you likely have, and knowledge of who the best specialists are and the ability to refer you to them.

I've worked with and for enough MBAs from Harvard on down to the University of Phoenix to know that the school the degree came from has no bearing on their effectiveness, or lack thereof, in the real world.

More important is are you and he/she on the same page about your health concerns, does the doctor treat you as a subject matter expert on you and does the doctor clearly explain the whys and hows of any procedure/process/guidance he/she offers. If no to any of these then find another doc




^^^This post nails it ^^^


empathetic doctors with a plan to create the best path for YOUR care are the best doctors

Last edited by gamefish25; 05-05-2021 at 02:49 PM.
Old 05-05-2021, 07:19 PM
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Seeing I have 6 different doctors I'd be OK with any of them coming from outside the US
Old 05-05-2021, 07:22 PM
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Doesn't mean shit. They are board qualified and do the job everyday.

The stuff they learn in medschool is all but outdated by the time they graduate and they have to constantly be up to date on procedures and medications.

I switched from a MD to a Nurse Practitioner as my primary care and couldn't be happier. Much better at listening to me, always timely, just as qualified, etc.
Old 05-05-2021, 07:27 PM
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50% of all doctors finish in the lower half of their class.

It has been years since I have seen a doctor that was born in the US. A few of mine are great even though I can't understand a word they say.
End of asking the nurse.

Doug
Old 05-05-2021, 08:18 PM
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Are medical schools in the US considering non-profit?

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