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patching drywall?

Old 02-09-2007, 10:44 PM
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squares are easier to patch because they are easier to cut the new pieces. Start your patchwork in an area that is less obvious (behind fridge, etc.) save the real obvious patches (ceilings etc) until you get a handle on WTF you are doing. cut the crappy spots back to the nearest nailer (stud, strapping, etc.) try to keep the cuts square as possible. screw the new pieces in and be sure to put some screws into the existing rock as well. don't screw to deep, just set them deep enough that you can't feel them when you run your hand over them, don't rip the paper. Use the mesh tape and dont be afraid to double tape any joints that are crappy. Hit the joints and screws with some durabond (you will need a mixing paddle and drill to mix it). feather the edges as best you can, especially on the existing sides. Keep it tight, basically just enough to hide the tape. Let the durabond set, and coat everything again with a tight coat of joint compound. let that dry and sand it out. Not sure what you have available for tools, but a small 10 inch trowel for the joints and a 6 inch putty knife for the screws etc would be good. Are there any inside angles or outside corners involved?
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Old 02-09-2007, 11:16 PM
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Garett, that description kicked ass. I saved it to my PC, because I know I'll refer to it again.

I rocked each summer in college. So I know enough to be dangerous as my advice here has shown.

But that taught me so many new tips and tricks while helping validate some of the stuff I've always done.

Change your screen name to Doc Rock.
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Old 02-10-2007, 09:23 AM
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Just starting to fill in some of my gaps:

When taping out a room, garage or house it is worth to make up one of these tools......it is a time saver. This simple tool allows you to feed out your tape without having to hang onto the roll. It frees up both of your hands. This simple home made tool is worth it's weight in gold IMO.





As I mentioned in one of my above threads, I pre cut all my tape before I start my taping. Here's how I cut my tape.

I use my putty knife for cutting my drywall tape. I'll start my tape let's say in the corner and walk the wall as I'm feed out my tape, when I get to the end of that seam that needs taping I just hold my putty knife (at a 90° angle to the wall) tight up against the tape and the wall and tear off the tape.......it gives you a clean rip every time. With out a doubt this is the easiest and fasted way to cut your tape to length.

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Old 02-10-2007, 09:55 AM
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On page two I had three drawings; I should have indicated that drywall screws should be installed here as well. This drawing is corrected.

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Old 02-11-2007, 12:41 AM
  #45  
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The work isn't done, but here are a couple photos of the patching. It's still in progress so don't worry about some of the slop. I haven't gotten to the point where I can put on thin coats that don't need sanding, but the final results are pretty smooth and undetectable. I put a coat of primer on today to even things out and help detect problem areas. Wow, what a difference having everything a single color makes! Oh, and I know I got a little crazy with the hammer - ripping out the old wiring and plumbing was a major PITA. You can't see it in the picture, but in one place I ended up having 5 or 6 pieces of drywall fitted together to make the patch because the hole was so long and shaped funny. I couldn't bring myself to cut a giant square hole in the ceiling. The opening that these pictures were taken through used to only be a doorway. I knocked down the wall and am joining the ceilings from the two rooms.



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Old 02-11-2007, 01:32 AM
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auh.....the guy can do this sort of work.....good for you. So how'd you end up filling the holes?
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Old 02-11-2007, 08:54 AM
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GOODNYOU - 2/7/2007 8:20 PM

Im a fan of the unikal on blueboard theory. 2 guys can hang and skimcoat 15 sheets in a day and it will be a perfect job with no sanding. You should wait 2 weks to paint though. It would cost about 500 - 600 in labor + materials.
Could you explain please?
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Old 02-11-2007, 11:29 AM
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Barrell, here's a link explaining the unikal/blueboard thing: http://www.bobvila.com/HowTo_Library...lls-A1484.html

Garett, some of the holes were small enough to cover with fiberglass tape, some needed drywall. I screwed in 1x2s behind like you described. It's a real mess because often the patch would sit lower or higher than the surrounding area. I'm having to use a lot of compound in some areas. And dealing with corners, both inside and outside, is still a big challenge. But enough compound and enough sanding and things eventually turn out OK. It certainly will be better than what was there before. Cabinets will cover a great deal of the work anyway.

Thanks for all the advice!
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Old 02-11-2007, 01:52 PM
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That probably took way more time than ripping it all out and redoing with full sheets. The time it would have saved wiring alone would have been worth starting from scratch.
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Old 02-11-2007, 02:44 PM
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Live and learn...
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Old 02-11-2007, 04:32 PM
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Garrett

Question: What do you prefer to use when finishing/repairing sheetrock, lightweight joint compound or the regular joint compound?
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Old 02-12-2007, 06:51 AM
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Cop, One of the hardest things to do is rip into a wall, so don't feel bad. But as I've said several times earlier, a patch is a patch regardless of what size it is. Experience teaches one the fine line between doing numerous patches apposed to cutting things out and making larger patches.

The repair of that wall and ceiling of yours, I would have just done three patches.........




Patching Material Sits to Low:

Over time a wall can be painted many times which adds to the thickness of a wall.....therefore your patching material appears to be to thin. Or you are trying to patch a blue board wall with drywall. For starters you are ahead of the game because the patching material is to thin, you can always add more compound to fill the void if the area isn’t to big. But there’s a better method to deal with this condition.

Here's how I deal with the patching material being thinner then the wall - paper or cardboard. I'll fold up some paper, rip out a cereal box or use cardboard as a spacer in between the wood backer strips and the back of the drywall patch. Using such materials for a spacer costs me nothing and it saves me compound and time afterwards.

Ok the wood backer strips are in place and I lay my patch in the hole and discover the patch sits to low. I don’t screw the patch on. I’ll feel how low the patch is to the wall and determine what I need for a spacer, and whip something up. I will hold the patch in place, place my paper, folded paper, cereal box cardboard or cardboard on top of my patch adjacent to the drywall that I am trying to flush up against and sort out what is needed to give me level/ flush. Whatever the quantity of material used is what I will install as a shim. I generally just masking tape the shim material onto the wood backer strips, then dry fit my patch again....adjust as needed.

Patching Material Sits to High:

I will apply the same principal as above, just in the reverse order. Once I have determined the amount of shim is need I will remove the wood backer strips and install my shim material between the wood strips and the back side of the drywall, then reinstall my drywall screws to hold the backer strips.

No doubt both of the above require some dicking around, but in the end it saves me time and money, plus I end up with a much better job especially when it comes to the patching material is to high. Several times I’ve ran across 3/8" drywall walls and all I had was ˝" material for the repair......I just shimmed out my wood backer strips, installed the ˝" drywall and I was the winner.
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Old 02-12-2007, 07:03 AM
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twentynine - 2/11/2007 5:32 PM

Garrett

Question: What do you prefer to use when finishing/repairing sheetrock, lightweight joint compound or the regular joint compound?
I myself only buy the regular joint compound.
- I want the fill properties of the thicker material when taping.
- I can always dilute down the thicker material, but I can not remover the water from the thinner material.
- Less material for me to stock and lug around.
- When you store your compound in a pail with water on top; even though you pour the water off before using, you are still adding a small amount of water to the mix. Well this added water dilutes down the finishing compound to thinner then I like to use.

edit: but I guess if one was doing a house or something very large where one was into numerous boxes of mud it would pay to buy and use both.
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Old 02-12-2007, 08:15 AM
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How to deal with all those drywall screws:

I guess I should make a few points here first:
- when boarding on fresh lumber one should always double screw everything. What I mean buy double screwing is, where you put one screw in, put another screw just above it an inch away. By doing this you greatly reduce the chance of screw head pops several months down the road.
- some drywaller's will only use 4 screws on wall panels for every stud and five on the ceilings....this I can live with, but out of habit I have always used 5 and 5. I feel by having 5 screws on my wall panels I reduce the chance of screw head pops.

Drywall Nails:

Where or when to use drywall nails?
- Personally I don't use to many of them any more. Where I would feel comfortable in using them is when remodeling old construction. Old wood just doesn't spit out nails like fresh wood does......all the drying of the wood has occurred. When I use nails, even on old construction I will still double nail.....I hate nail pops. My one concern for using nails is when renovating say a kitchen, there always seems to be something on the other side of that wall....I don't want to be improving something while damaging something else......therefore I use screws!
- When I am working by myself sometimes I find it easier to set a nail to help hold the panel. Then after I have the panel screwed in place I will drift the nail in deep and place a couple of screws in, one above and one below......I hate nail pops!



In the picture below is the proper way to deal with drywall screws. My comments are working from left to right.

- Start by applying the mud as I indicated earlier, as shown in the second row. I’m working with my 5" putty knife. When your mud is applied it will look like in the first row.
- While still standing there, clean your knife off on the hawk.
- With the clean knife held at close to a 90° angle "scrap" all the mud off you just laid down with a pulling action of the knife, approx. angle of 50-60°. This will force the mud into the countersunk area and the screw head....third row.
* all you are leaving behind is the mud that is filling the countersunk drywall screw and the screw head.
- Clean your knife off on the hawk, load up your knife for the next row, repeat until all the screws are done. Do all the screws as a separate job.
- After this is dry, repeat the process
* if you need to, “push” your 5 putty knife over each run to remove any lumpies you may or may not have created. You shouldn’t have to if you cleaned things off when you applied the mud in the first place.
- After this is dry, repeat the process
- After this is dry, a quick and light sanding is all that is needed.
* remember that you want transparent edges of your compound to the drywall.

Far to often I see people dealing with each screw independently and with globs of mud....last row ????? All they are doing is creating a ton of work for them self and wasting materials. Besides I can do all three screws in the length of time it takes to do one!



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Old 02-12-2007, 08:21 AM
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Garett, I got in the house over the weekend and took those shots of the taping job. What are your thoughts, and should I buy regular mud, or thinner (finishing?) mud? Thanks again for all your suggestions.


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Old 02-13-2007, 01:54 AM
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Hey that's a good looking job for a garage.......I've seen a hundred times worse!

In the below:
A) - any and all runs of tape longer then a few inches that look like that I'd cut it and peal it out!
- if there is anything loose under the tape just scrap it out with a screwdriver or the corner of your putty knife.
- after all the loose debris has been remove give the area a once over with the putty knife just to make sure there is nothing sticking up or loose.
- just tape the seam like you would any other tape seam.
* Every time you put another coat over top of a damage area like that, it will boil up on you from the moisture of the coat you just applied; you will NEVER catch up to it! Cut it out and start with a fresh run of tape.

B) - sometimes you will only get a very small section which has bubbled up.....those I cut just cut out and fill it with mud.

C) - sometimes you'll see where the edge of the tape has not stuck, just cut it out as shown and fill it with mud.

When I cut these sections out I just take my utility knife and apply enough pressure to cut through the tape and then pick it out with the tip of the blade. If you cut through the paper tape that section generally comes out quite easy.

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Old 04-09-2007, 02:03 PM
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Just to follow up with this. I'm almost done with the kitchen. Maybe another 3 or 4 days to add cabinet trim and knobs, clean, touch up paint, and caulk. I did everything 100% myself. New floors, walls (some added, some removed), ceiling, wiring, plumbing, gas, appliances, lights, cabinets, ducts, counter, etc. I even built drawers from scratch and modified the cabinets and shelves to go around the wall protrusions. The counter is coated with shellac and epoxy (shellac adds color and prevents wood pores from releasing air bubbles into epoxy). It's been a long 3 months, but would guess that I saved at least $10k in labor costs.

At the open house. Kitchen is so small there is no dishwasher or even drawers!


Two weeks after moving in, totally gutted.


There used to be a wall here.


Yesterday, 11 weeks after starting project. I cooked the first meal last night and cleaned up in the dishwasher.
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Old 04-09-2007, 02:12 PM
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Wow Cooper, looks like a GREAT job. What was the beverage of choice with the 1st meal?
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Old 04-09-2007, 03:28 PM
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Really nice! A lot of satisfaction in a job well done yourself.
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Old 04-09-2007, 08:24 PM
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That's a good looking job!

So is that real butcher block counter top?
So how are you finishing off counter top to the wall? Will you be adding trim of some sort to the cupboards to the wall?



I can't really tell, but are those wall outlets within 6' of the sink? If so they need to be GFI'd!

edit: in the future, there is no need to drill shelf holes basically all the way from the top to the bottom for adjustable shelving in those lower cabinets. Especially holes are not needed where your drawers are going to be!

In that last grouping of pics 1,2,3,4, pic #3, lowers, the two cabinets on the right side of what appears to be the dishwasher you should consider making those two cabinets as a single unit.....you would have saved the gable end material of one of the cabinets. The job looks good from here. The crown looks good.
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