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Painting Trim - Orange Peel...Help?

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Painting Trim - Orange Peel...Help?

Old 12-14-2020, 10:12 AM
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Default Painting Trim - Orange Peel...Help?

Hey guys. I started my trim-repainting project. This job includes repainting baseboards, door trim, and doors. I'm switching from oil-based to latex based paints. I'm getting slightly irritated at the results.

On the larger flat surfaces, I'm rolling on my primer and paint with a high-density foam roller, and it's leaving behind an orange-peel texture. What am I doing wrong? Too much paint? Too little? Rolling too fast/slow? Too much pressure?
Old 12-14-2020, 10:27 AM
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Sounds like the paint might be setting up before it has a chance to flow out. Maybe add a little Penetrol or similar to thin it just a bit. Also not a fan of a roller for trim paint, would probably be better with a high quality brush, especially if using semi gloss.
Old 12-14-2020, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Retiredearly View Post
Sounds like the paint might be setting up before it has a chance to flow out. Maybe add a little Penetrol or similar to thin it just a bit. Also not a fan of a roller for trim paint, would probably be better with a high quality brush, especially if using semi gloss.

I have been using a brush and it does a better job with the texture. Although, I still get brush strokes occasionally.
Old 12-14-2020, 10:39 AM
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Switch to a standard woven acrylic medium to fine nap roller. Something like the purdy 1/4" to 3/8" nap. The 3/8 always worked fine for us.

Other option that may help is to roll out your roller on a dry portion of bordering wall and backroll the area with the orange peel.
Old 12-14-2020, 10:43 AM
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Did you sand the old oil-based paint first? If not, you'll continue to get orange peel with your latex top coat, especially if the old paint is a gloss or semi-gloss finish. Alternatively use a primer like Kilz, preferably oil-based if you want good results. Water-based Kilz (or equivalent) will work, just not as good.
Old 12-14-2020, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Cobia 217 View Post
Did you sand the old oil-based paint first? If not, you'll continue to get orange peel with your latex top coat, especially if the old paint is a gloss or semi-gloss finish. Alternatively use a primer like Kilz, preferably oil-based if you want good results. Water-based Kilz (or equivalent) will work, just not as good.
Yeah I scuff sanded it pretty good and then applied my primer.

Why would the oil-based primer you suggested work better than the water-based?
Old 12-14-2020, 11:23 AM
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If you're going over oil based paint, you really need to use an oil based primer.
Old 12-14-2020, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by c_m_25 View Post
Yeah I scuff sanded it pretty good and then applied my primer.

Why would the oil-based primer you suggested work better than the water-based?
It would have better compatibility with the base coat and allows the new paint to "wet out" the surface more evenly, without fish eyes or orange peeling. Did you have any of this happen when you applied the primer?
Old 12-14-2020, 12:08 PM
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"Liquid sand paper" should stop the orange peel and fish eye.
In the long term, nothing sticks to gloss oil paint except the same. Like painting over the old varnish in my house. I did everything recommended, but I'm still getting chips here or there.
Old 12-14-2020, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Cobia 217 View Post
It would have better compatibility with the base coat and allows the new paint to "wet out" the surface more evenly, without fish eyes or orange peeling. Did you have any of this happen when you applied the primer?
Yes I am having the is problem with the primer too. I think a lot of this is technique as I get a smooth finish when using the brush. However, I can see what you’re saying and may give a different primer a shot on the next door
Old 12-14-2020, 06:57 PM
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Its because you're rolling it.
Old 12-15-2020, 04:28 AM
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Roll to get volume of paint on the work quickly then “tip” with a soft brush.
sanding your primer before applying the finish coat also helps.

Old 12-15-2020, 05:46 AM
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Agree with the suggestions above...I've always brushed my trim work. IF you are going to roll it get a quality woven roller like Purdy with a short nap if the surface is smooth...foam rollers will leave a rough finish in my experience.
Old 12-15-2020, 05:55 AM
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I was always told to NEVER paint latex over oil based paint.
Old 12-15-2020, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by king_me View Post
I was always told to NEVER paint latex over oil based paint.
It can be done with good results as long as a good primer (preferably oil-based) is used. Glossy oil finishes are the toughest to get latex to adhere to. Even a good latex primer will have a hard time with a glossy oil finish. Not the case with an oil-based primer. You can get low-odor oil primers that have faster drying times than the old-school oil primers, which is a plus when priming old ceilings or large areas. Old ceilings that have calcimine typically had oil-based paint applied. Joe homeowner then tries to slap on some latex ceiling paint and gets a huge peeling mess after a few months because the latex paint begins to lift right off. Oil based paint tends to penetrate the surface better and does a better job of binding the powder in the ceiling. It will eventually need some scraping and repainting but that's the nature of the beast.

Last edited by Cobia 217; 12-15-2020 at 06:28 AM.
Old 12-15-2020, 07:24 AM
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Old 12-15-2020, 07:31 AM
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Yeah, I always go oil primer over old oil paint, then latex. I've never rolled trim either, just a good brush.
And use more paint....if your brush is too dry, you'll get brush strokes too.

For big surfaces, like doors, I sprayed them. I don't have any fancy airless equipment or anything, but this $60 thing off Amazon (edit: I guess $75 now) did an outstanding job painting my doors.
I just had to thin the paint a ton; almost to the brink of the allowable thinning ratio.

There was certainly a learning curve, but once I figured it out, the results were nothing short of awesome.
https://www.amazon.com/HomeRight-C800766-C900076-Painting-Projects/dp/B003VKFDEO/ref=sr_1_6?crid=3EPRNB17SVTAC&dchild=1&keywords=home+max+paint+sprayer&amp
Old 12-15-2020, 09:39 AM
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I went through this once with cabinets at a lakehouse in Leesburg. I had to scuff the surface, use a bonding primer, scuff it and use 2 coats of a regular primer, scuff it and use 2 coats of paint; scuffing the first coat of paint. It came out fine but if I had to do it again I would have a painter come in and spray

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