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Filling Rotten Spots on Beach House Pilings

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Filling Rotten Spots on Beach House Pilings

Old 12-02-2020, 01:15 PM
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Default Filling Rotten Spots on Beach House Pilings

After the last hurricane that brushed North Florida I helped my in-laws repair and update their beach house. As part of the repair we leveled the house as it had settled about 2 inches in the middle. Our engineer designed a 24" x 24" x 36" concrete and rebar pad at each piling. Additionally he specified 2 8x8 posts being installed on the sides of the old pilings and all the cross bracing be replaced with new dimensional lumber. He recommended against removing the old pilings. He felt they were still providing some benefit. The house was leveled and all repairs made to his specifications.

Over the last few years a few of the rotten spots have gotten worse. I would like to fill them to prevent water intrusion and/or a place for bugs to make a home. I have no idea what material to use to fill these holes. The largest is about the size of a baseball. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
Old 12-02-2020, 01:19 PM
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Bondo
Old 12-02-2020, 01:20 PM
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Hot roofing Tar.
Old 12-02-2020, 01:23 PM
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I have used this with amazing success filling and repairing rotten spots in exterior wood trim, window sills, and decorative wood window details.

https://www.abatron.com/product/liquidwood/
https://www.abatron.com/product/woodepox/

- Remove the loose stuff
- I actually stuck a few nails for the epoxy to grab onto
- Paint the entire surface with the liquid wood, let it tack
- Mix the putty with your hands and fill the rot; keep it a little proud
- sands easily once cured.

paint or finish however you want.
Old 12-02-2020, 02:12 PM
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Flexseal.

In reality I'd ask a structural engineer to come take a look and advise how to repair, then hire someone to do the suggested repairs.
Old 12-02-2020, 02:31 PM
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Any pictures? Are we talking wood, treated or creosote?
The 8x8's are doing the work so I would use anything that will keep the rot from getting worse.
Stiff mixed concrete would work as would any epoxy filler.
Old 12-02-2020, 04:12 PM
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Old 12-02-2020, 04:23 PM
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Overkill by the engineer. Just take the old ones out.
Old 12-02-2020, 04:47 PM
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Epoxy resin would be strong and last a long time.
Old 12-02-2020, 04:54 PM
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Originally Posted by astm216 View Post
After the last hurricane that brushed North Florida I helped my in-laws repair and update their beach house. As part of the repair we leveled the house as it had settled about 2 inches in the middle. Our engineer designed a 24" x 24" x 36" concrete and rebar pad at each piling. Additionally he specified 2 8x8 posts being installed on the sides of the old pilings and all the cross bracing be replaced with new dimensional lumber. He recommended against removing the old pilings. He felt they were still providing some benefit. The house was leveled and all repairs made to his specifications.

Over the last few years a few of the rotten spots have gotten worse. I would like to fill them to prevent water intrusion and/or a place for bugs to make a home. I have no idea what material to use to fill these holes. The largest is about the size of a baseball. Any suggestions would be much appreciated.
can you take some pictures of this work? I’m going to need to do the same thing soon to my place and looking for some ideas
Old 12-02-2020, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by 25WildBlue View Post
I have used this with amazing success filling and repairing rotten spots in exterior wood trim, window sills, and decorative wood window details.

https://www.abatron.com/product/liquidwood/
https://www.abatron.com/product/woodepox/

- Remove the loose stuff
- I actually stuck a few nails for the epoxy to grab onto
- Paint the entire surface with the liquid wood, let it tack
- Mix the putty with your hands and fill the rot; keep it a little proud
- sands easily once cured.

paint or finish however you want.
great product...absolutely fantastic!
After digging out the rot to solid wood I’d imagine you’ll have some decent size holes to fill.
You will go broke though filling pilings with it!
How about some nice fitting PT Dutchmen ?
Old 12-02-2020, 06:33 PM
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Without seeing it I would say epoxy too. West Systems also makes some structural filler you can add to the resin to build out with and make a workable mixture to a stiffer consistency. I have used this successfully on rotten hatches and other spot repairs in wood. It needs to be dry to bond good.
Old 12-02-2020, 06:46 PM
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If you can get a form around it, maybe use that pourable transom epoxy.
Old 12-02-2020, 06:47 PM
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Be careful, you may need enviro approval.
Old 12-03-2020, 05:52 AM
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First thing I would do is inject git rot into the wood around the rotten spots to stop the rot from spreading. If the rotten areas still have the wood fibers intact, the git rot is all you need.

But why not just make a temporary support and replace the piling?
Old 12-03-2020, 07:43 AM
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https://www.walmart.com/ip/Durham-s-...7b4a3447c49a4c

Love this stuff!
Old 12-03-2020, 01:55 PM
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Originally Posted by Brad1 View Post
But why not just make a temporary support and replace the piling?
It already has permanent supports on either side of it.

Originally Posted by skibum View Post
I like it to but not so much for large areas. I've mixed bondo and polyester resin together , than mixed in both hardeners and filled pretty large cavities . One time it got so hot I had to keep ice on it. But it works great.
Old 12-03-2020, 05:33 PM
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Thanks everyone for all the ideas. Cant remove the old ones now they are incased in the same newly installed concrete and rebar pads the 8x8's sit on. I think the idea I like best is to clean it out, drill in some long stainless screws to provide something to grab on and fill with a concrete vinyl patch or some kind of Bondo. Again, thanks everyone!
Old 12-03-2020, 05:34 PM
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Originally Posted by muskrattown View Post
Any pictures? Are we talking wood, treated or creosote?
The 8x8's are doing the work so I would use anything that will keep the rot from getting worse.
Stiff mixed concrete would work as would any epoxy filler.
Treated round pilings
Old 12-03-2020, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by TorFed View Post
Flexseal.

In reality I'd ask a structural engineer to come take a look and advise how to repair, then hire someone to do the suggested repairs.
Asked the same engineer that helped with repair. He said fill with anything that wont fall out! He said the load is 95% carried by the new PT posts

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