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Pointing Large granite retaining wall?

Old 10-05-2020, 08:15 PM
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Default Pointing Large granite retaining wall?

Any ideas of the correct mortar mix to re-point a large exterior granite retaining wall?
• Cement
• Sand
• Lime?
Wall is approximately 70’ long and 10’ high.
Estimate it to be100 years old.
Located in the Northeast. Just received a verbal quote for $8500. Structurally in very good condition but the mortar is falling out in spots . We have a smaller wall that I want to attempt repairing myself and then decide how to proceed with the larger wall.
photos of smaller wall below. Approximately 15’ long by 5’ high. Same material as large wall not pictured .



Old 10-05-2020, 08:49 PM
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It actually looks good. I would Point mortar the top to keep water then ice out.
Old 10-06-2020, 04:17 AM
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Beautiful wall, I like granite.I know just enogh about masonry to be dangerous, but would think type S motor with sand already in it would work.
Old 10-06-2020, 05:09 AM
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Just watched this, "Professional repair" , on this wall and the comments said mortar he used is bad for the stone.
They are saying stone walls need lime mortar.
Lime mortar breaths and is elastic.



This.



.
Old 10-06-2020, 05:09 AM
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I built a smaller rock wall version several years ago. My dad had worked for a stone mason when he was a kid and passed some of those skill to me. In the Northeast (or anywhere where there is significant frost) the secret to longevity was weep holes, that is getting the water out from behind the earthen side (thereby not allowing it to freeze behind the wall). The old mason my dad worked for built wine bottles into the wall, then when finished (and the mortar was dry) would break the bottles.

The cork end would be very close to the front of the wall, where the gaps are in the pictures. Your wall may already have some means of getting the water out....just can't tell in the pictures. However, it looks like it's been there a while and probably will for many years.

To your question, I simply used the premixed sand/mortar from Home Depot.

My .02
Old 10-06-2020, 06:20 AM
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Originally Posted by 240 LTS View Post
Just watched this, "Professional repair" , on this wall and the comments said mortar he used is bad for the stone.
They are saying stone walls need lime mortar.
Lime mortar breaths and is elastic.
.
I was going to say that's a LOT of work repairing those walls.

Back during my college days I worked part time for a furniture store hauling furniture around.
The owner of the store bought a house and had me erect a stone structure around his kids slide leading into the pool.
What a PITA that job was.
Finished about 2/3rds of that structure and told that guy he had to give me a raise if he wanted his damn rock structure finished. He said NOPE and I said Good By but not in a nice way. Fricken Dirt Bag!!!
I bent over backwards for this asswipe trying to look out for the customers.
What's worse than a vehicle sales person? A furniture reseller.
This douche bag would screw old folks out of $10 of thousands of dollars worth of high dollar or antique furniture for pennies on the dollar. They never knew what they had and he would screw them EVERY time.
Made my stomach turn every time I had to go pick a load up because I knew the DB screwed the old people. This is a PREDITOR of a different nature.


Back to topic; These type of projects take an immense amount of time to repair and finish properly. Very time consuming.

OP, get a couple quotes and then check them out for references.
Old 10-06-2020, 07:38 AM
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I second the pre-mix bags of mortar at HD or Lowes, make the job a lot easier, I would wet the repair joint and give it a coat of bonding adhesive first. I think the biggest issue is doing the repair and still making it look good on a 100 year old wall and not have it stick out like a sore thumb. Due to aesthetic value what's the down side of just leaving it be?
Old 10-06-2020, 09:22 AM
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Thanks for the info . Wife wants it done. Makes my life easier to do it. I can’t imagine those blocks shifting much as is.
Old 10-06-2020, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by 240 LTS View Post
Just watched this, "Professional repair" , on this wall and the comments said mortar he used is bad for the stone.
They are saying stone walls need lime mortar.
Lime mortar breaths and is elastic. .
JMO but he totally destroyed the look of that wall.

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