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should use of stucco be banned?

Old 10-01-2020, 02:10 PM
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Default should use of stucco be banned?

or at least stucco over wood? I keep seeing homes down in Charleston built 10 or 15 years ago being totally demolished (like with a backhoe) due to mold and termites bad flashing etc? one last week maybe a 1.5 million home 3 story.
I see so many stucco re do s. tear off stucco replace with something else.

Last edited by edwardh1; 10-01-2020 at 04:31 PM.
Old 10-01-2020, 02:43 PM
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I guess like any type of construction, if it's not done right, it's going to cause you grief later, doesn't mean it should be banned.
Old 10-01-2020, 02:47 PM
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What you are seeing is most likely EIFS and not stucco...

It was banned for a time in New Hanover County NC.

Old 10-01-2020, 02:52 PM
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It was all bad installation and untrained stucco subcontractors. It's the same way around Atlanta. Siding installers often just run the siding down into the dirt and the termites would come in under the siding--every time.

6 inches or more of concrete needs to be showing around the homes so owners and pest control guys could watch for termite dirt tunnels.

If you get down to it, pest control companies are often more of insurance companies than they are bug and critter killers. They want to put little traps all around your house to watch at a cost of $50 a month. Dig in your yard and you will find termites in every shovel of dirt. You just don't want the little bastards within 6" of your home.

I learned all about termites and carpenter ants the hard way--from experience.
Old 10-01-2020, 02:58 PM
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Stucco done poorly is a disaster. Stucco done correctly should last a very long time. The 20 unit condo community I live in went down the learning curve ....... it only cost $2m to have the problem corrected.
Old 10-01-2020, 03:00 PM
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There was a synthetic stucco product in use for a while that gave rise to a lot of problems and lawsuits. It was easy to apply and looked good, but it pretty much encapsulated houses in a plastic wrap. Moisture was trapped behind the stucco and the house framing rotted. Lots of coastal places had this issue.
Old 10-01-2020, 03:02 PM
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20 years ago I lived in a house built in 1915 with the original stucco exterior. I know that house is still in good shape. This was in Wyoming so the climate was different and there are no termites in wyoming either.
Old 10-01-2020, 03:12 PM
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Stucco over block lasts a lifetime. Gotta fill cracks and paint. Pretty easy and durable.

Old 10-01-2020, 03:53 PM
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Drive by inspections were not uncommon where I live.
Old 10-01-2020, 04:02 PM
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Originally Posted by txj33p View Post
There was a synthetic stucco product in use for a while that gave rise to a lot of problems and lawsuits. It was easy to apply and looked good, but it pretty much encapsulated houses in a plastic wrap. Moisture was trapped behind the stucco and the house framing rotted. Lots of coastal places had this issue.
Dryvit.

Just polystyrene panels, coated with mesh, with a mortar/styrofoam beads applied.

Problem is water getting behind from something not sealed well with caulk ....and closed up so cant drain out either. I have part of front of house done with it...25 yrs no problem.

Eliminating roof overhangs.....for cost and style.....dumb.
That that overhang kept water out of all kind of poorly sealed places. Water can get in walls a whole lot easier without it.
Old 10-01-2020, 04:15 PM
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It's not stucco, it is wood frame that should be banned in most of the south. Termites are getting worse, and termite protection is virtually non existent.
Old 10-01-2020, 04:29 PM
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Zip system properly taped with tar paper and rainscreed to allow a open channel for the water that permeates thru the stucco to run out the bottom weep holes. Done right it’s fine unfortunately many times it’s installed incorrectly.
Old 10-01-2020, 06:42 PM
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I owned a home in Homestead that was wood frame stucco built in the 1930's It went thru Hurricane Andrew with not a lot of damage to the structure. (1 cracked roof truss when the chimney fell onto the roof) I owned it from 1982 till 1999 when I moved. Found zero damage while rebuilding after Andrew. 1 floor joist had termite damage and that was below stucco level. I guess they knew how to do it back in the day
Old 10-01-2020, 06:58 PM
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I would never buy a wood constructed home in south FL.
Old 10-01-2020, 07:06 PM
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Thats what you get with open borders.
Old 10-01-2020, 07:09 PM
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All the newer homes in the FL suburbs use that crap on their second stories. I know I'll never own one.
Old 10-01-2020, 07:16 PM
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Stucco over drainage mat and wire lathe is the way to go. Stucco over foam is a nightmare
Old 10-01-2020, 07:20 PM
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Weep screeds are important
Old 10-01-2020, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by blindmullet View Post
All the newer homes in the FL suburbs use that crap on their second stories. I know I'll never own one.
No doubt. Wood framed second floors with stucco exteriors. Stucco cracks everywhere, water intrusion into the wall and hope it seaps out and exits at the drip edge. Water intrusion around the windows as a bonus! Count me out too.
Old 10-01-2020, 08:46 PM
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so its brick or hardie plank? seems Hardie would breath better?

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