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Makes me never want to go on an overnight dive charter, ever.

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Makes me never want to go on an overnight dive charter, ever.

Old 09-17-2020, 08:53 AM
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Default Makes me never want to go on an overnight dive charter, ever.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/no...zvN?li=BBnb7Kz
Old 09-17-2020, 08:58 AM
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Very sad for all involved. Hard to believe no watch stander with 5 crew . And why smoke detectors didn’t go off early enough. accidents are always a chain of events. Break one link and no accident.
Old 09-17-2020, 09:01 AM
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I love diving and I love boats, but the thought of overnighting on one of these boats as opposed to a nice resort it just not appealing.
Old 09-17-2020, 10:00 AM
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The hardest part about safety and compliance is that our brains are wired to start ignoring it after a period of time, that's why we need regulations and procedures and constant reminders. After many uneventful trips you start getting more relaxed about safety. Especially a problem if the crew has never experienced an emergency themselves, not having that scar tissue as a constant reminder. Everyone including the victims should know what an overloaded power strip looks like, and understand the dangers of batteries and chargers.

THT is great for safety reminders, and I tend to come away from here with safety knowledge that scares people into disbelief that I am overreacting to a situation that would "never happen." But I prefer to know worst case and know what to do in them. Like airplane water landing safety instructions when you aren't flying over water, listen anyway and take any training you can get.
Old 09-17-2020, 10:03 AM
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So sad and prayers for all the families.
Old 09-17-2020, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Tim71 View Post
The hardest part about safety and compliance is that our brains are wired to start ignoring it after a period of time, that's why we need regulations and procedures and constant reminders. After many uneventful trips you start getting more relaxed about safety. Especially a problem if the crew has never experienced an emergency themselves, not having that scar tissue as a constant reminder. Everyone including the victims should know what an overloaded power strip looks like, and understand the dangers of batteries and chargers.

THT is great for safety reminders, and I tend to come away from here with safety knowledge that scares people into disbelief that I am overreacting to a situation that would "never happen." But I prefer to know worst case and know what to do in them. Like airplane water landing safety instructions when you aren't flying over water, listen anyway and take any training you can get.
EXCELLENT points. Some people think I overthink the "what if" scenarios (boating, diving, Marxist zombie invasion, etc.) but by training your mind to anticipate these "will never happen!" things, when and if they DO happen, you will have a fighting chance of surviving it.

Old 09-17-2020, 10:23 AM
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The real problem is that they had no one standing watch. Checking off "emergency procedures were read to the crew" wouldn't have helped much -- in an uncontrolled fire situation they're obvious and simple: get everyone out as fast as you can.
Old 09-17-2020, 11:01 AM
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The older hulls are exempt from current USCG mandates. They are death traps for the unwary without an exemplary crew. This tragedy illustrates the point. Any passenger should bring a traveler’s portable smoke/CO detector.
Old 09-17-2020, 11:36 AM
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Originally Posted by grey2112 View Post
EXCELLENT points. Some people think I overthink the "what if" scenarios (boating, diving, Marxist zombie invasion, etc.) but by training your mind to anticipate these "will never happen!" things, when and if they DO happen, you will have a fighting chance of surviving it.
First, let me start by saying this was a horrible tragedy no matter who was responsible. That being said, your safety ultimately falls squarely upon your shoulders. If I had booked a charter on that boat, showed up and seen that sleeping arrangement, I would have said no thanks, I’m either sleeping on deck or cancelling my trip. When I go diving on your boat, I bring my own EPIRB and hand held VHF. Not because I think your boat is unsafe or I doubt your abilities (I wouldn’t go with you in the first place if I thought that), but for the same reason I bring my own dive float, I want to make sure I’m sleeping in my own bed at the end of the day. When I go on someone else’s boat, charter or private, I am expecting them to watch out for my safety, but I make sure I have my own back if need be. You or anyone else is welcome to bring their own safety gear on my boat as well, redundancy is never a bad thing.

Old 09-17-2020, 11:50 AM
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Reading that article, they were set up for failure.
Old 09-17-2020, 12:01 PM
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I can't believe they had a boatful of people onboard, sleeping overnight and no crew members standing night watches. This time it was fire, it could have been taking on water and sunk/capsized. Someone should have been making rounds.
Old 09-17-2020, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by FinReaper069 View Post
First, let me start by saying this was a horrible tragedy no matter who was responsible. That being said, your safety ultimately falls squarely upon your shoulders. If I had booked a charter on that boat, showed up and seen that sleeping arrangement, I would have said no thanks, I’m either sleeping on deck or cancelling my trip. When I go diving on your boat, I bring my own EPIRB and hand held VHF. Not because I think your boat is unsafe or I doubt your abilities (I wouldn’t go with you in the first place if I thought that), but for the same reason I bring my own dive float, I want to make sure I’m sleeping in my own bed at the end of the day. When I go on someone else’s boat, charter or private, I am expecting them to watch out for my safety, but I make sure I have my own back if need be. You or anyone else is welcome to bring their own safety gear on my boat as well, redundancy is never a bad thing.
Well said, and I agree 100%
Old 09-17-2020, 12:57 PM
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Originally Posted by FishnDive View Post
I can't believe they had a boatful of people onboard, sleeping overnight and no crew members standing night watches. This time it was fire, it could have been taking on water and sunk/capsized. Someone should have been making rounds.
The article did not say no one was on watch it just said all were asleep.
Old 09-17-2020, 01:01 PM
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did they ever figure out the exact cause of the fire?
Old 09-17-2020, 01:02 PM
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There's a previous thread about this here: 34 Dead In CA Boat Fire
Old 09-17-2020, 01:41 PM
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I knew 2 people that died in that fire. Adrian DaHood, now Adrian DaHood-Fritz worked in my lab for 2 years and she was one of my divers. I met her husband Andrew Fritz when they came back to the Keys to visit old friends and colleagues. To hear of her passing was quite the shock, but then to hear of the massive loss of life aboard the Conception is heartbreaking.

I've spent hundred of nights aboard liveaboard dive boats. Probably half of those are on EPA, NOAA, or University boats 90' and up to 189'. But also on several smaller (charter) boats that were 41' to 100'. Probably 20 to 25 different boats over the years. I've lost track.

Regardless of the size, all boats, if I recall correctly, had very strict protocols in place for battery charging stations. On the government boats it was extremely strict. We always powered multiple different instruments and equipment with various batteries and types, but regardless there was always one specific area set aside as a charging station. Computers, cameras, scooter batteries, video camera batteries, strobe batteries and even cell phones could not be charged unless they were plugged into a UPS/surge protected source. Additionally, unless we were on a very small vessel (under 50') there was always, ALWAYS, a person standing watch. They were like roaches, you never saw them unless it was dark out.

These people died for one reason and one reason only. No one was awake and standing a vigilant watch. Terribly sad.
Old 09-17-2020, 01:46 PM
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Originally Posted by fishingfun View Post
The article did not say no one was on watch it just said all were asleep.
The NTSB will not speculate on the cause of the fire, as the investigation is still ongoing, but one finding in the agency’s final report could be the lack of a standing night watch—a violation of UCSG rules—since the NTSB’s preliminary report found that all crew members were asleep when the blaze broke out. If the final report confirms that the ship did not have a standing night watch, the captain or vessel owner could serve up to ten years in prison, according to U.S. code.
Old 09-17-2020, 02:10 PM
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Is the sister ship still running charters?
Old 09-17-2020, 04:19 PM
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Years ago I did a 7 day dive cruise on the Nikton pilot. One of the most amazing trips I've ever been on.
Old 09-17-2020, 04:21 PM
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old news from last year.
it was beat to death back then

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