Go Back  The Hull Truth - Boating and Fishing Forum > BOATING FORUMS > Dockside Chat
Reload this Page >

Food plots that thrive on wet to swampy land in the SE

Notices

Food plots that thrive on wet to swampy land in the SE

Old 07-09-2020, 01:19 PM
  #21  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Carolina Beach/Charlotte/Lake Wylie
Posts: 1,523
Received 189 Likes on 113 Posts
Default

Plant some Oriental persimmons. Apples probably won’t do well. My oriental persimmons get loaded every year and don’t seem to ever prone to disease or blight. They’re the size of a tennis ball.
Old 07-09-2020, 01:22 PM
  #22  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Tarpon Springs, FL
Posts: 8,672
Received 4,073 Likes on 2,315 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
Talk to Wannamaker seed in St. Matthews SC. they will have something most likely. They specialize in wildlife habitat seed.
Amen, I would go to my local seed store and ask. But it would have to be underwater for brown top millet not to grow.
Old 07-09-2020, 02:07 PM
  #23  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
PLEDGERPLEDGERPLEDGERPLEDGER
 
Snapper Head's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Republic of West Florida - the ORIGINAL lone star state
Posts: 17,848
Received 1,114 Likes on 494 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Tireless View Post

I like the idea of making some soil.

Not having any problem getting the tractor and myself covered in dirt.
It's almost Saturday.

You might want to consider taking a shower.

Big Al
Old 07-09-2020, 03:10 PM
  #24  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: SE Georgia
Posts: 136
Received 45 Likes on 21 Posts
Default

I'm in Brooklet too, on mud road. My soil is awfuI, normally just feed corn but I put in some rye one year it grew well and they loved it.

Last edited by userid1960; 07-09-2020 at 05:21 PM.
Old 07-09-2020, 03:27 PM
  #25  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 8,308
Received 1,321 Likes on 736 Posts
Default

1/4 acre is only good for shooting deer during season, harvest aid. It will in no way provide enough protein to enhance antler and body development. Proper prescribed burning, provided it is pines, will do much more to increase body and antler size. Summer food plots are pretty much useless. Fertlilizing the blue berries would be good.

Try letting a food plot go fallow. Cut it in June or early July. Fertilize it then and right before season opens. Just try it.
Old 07-09-2020, 03:37 PM
  #26  
Senior MemberPLEDGERPLEDGERCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: ATL & SAV
Posts: 12,371
Received 2,007 Likes on 990 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Snapper Head View Post
It's almost Saturday.

You might want to consider taking a shower.

Big Al
I'll get one tomorrow before happy hour at poolside. Nobody wants to attract flies at a party.
Old 07-09-2020, 03:40 PM
  #27  
Senior MemberPLEDGERPLEDGERCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: ATL & SAV
Posts: 12,371
Received 2,007 Likes on 990 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Gary999 View Post
1/4 acre is only good for shooting deer during season, harvest aid. It will in no way provide enough protein to enhance antler and body development. Proper prescribed burning, provided it is pines, will do much more to increase body and antler size. Summer food plots are pretty much useless. Fertlilizing the blue berries would be good.

Try letting a food plot go fallow. Cut it in June or early July. Fertilize it then and right before season opens. Just try it.
We are building numerous plots throughout the farm......acres of plots. This one happens to be in really wet soil.
Old 07-09-2020, 08:12 PM
  #28  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 8,308
Received 1,321 Likes on 736 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Tireless View Post
We are building numerous plots throughout the farm......acres of plots. This one happens to be in really wet soil.
Still little to no affect for increasing body size or antlers. Speaking from experience with 1000 acres and published info. Pretty much the same latitude but in SE AL.
Old 07-10-2020, 08:21 AM
  #29  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 130
Received 67 Likes on 30 Posts
Default Many Options...Keep It Simple

Lots of great ideas here...each of us has had our successes and failures and our favorite plot choices.

The QDMA website has dozens of food plot articles to browse and get ideas, and their Food Plot Book has great regionally-appropriate planting mix recommendations. An evening of reading online on in-book is worth it.
Dr Craig Harper from U of Tenn also has done some GREAT work on food plots, and, like some here on THT, is a big proponent of early successional natural growth to provide a high quality high biomass inexpensive nutritional source. For many areas, periodic prescribed fire or deep discing to kill the non-native grasses and encourage the growth of forbs can be a great alternative to food plots. Check out Dr Harper's book on Early Successional Growth for deer.

The OP has a basic question: what food plot species would be good for that particular high moisture spot in SE Georgia; and some great ideas have been provided.

It is true that a single 1/4 acre plot will not provide any significant additional nutrition, but it can be an attraction plot for viewing hunting, or encouraging deer to spend more time on your property, and with other food plots on the property can be a big part of providing what the deer want and need. The choice of what to plant there or even IF to plant at all depends on many factors; available equipment, cost, accessibility, purpose, etc.

Warm season (May-September) plots can provide additional nutrition at a critical late-summer time when natural forage may be dry and tough. Summer plots can also lessen the need for fertilizer for the fall plot if they are mowed or plowed prior to fall planting. Warm season plots are often legumes such as beans, peas, deer vetch (all very high-quality nutrition with very high attraction), and others. 1/4 acre of beans of peas is not large enough to withstand the browsing of even a few deer, that's why I use deer vetch (Aschenomene)...they hammer it but the new growth is still tender and attractive to them.
Most warm season plots are followed up by cool season plots, usually grain or grain-annual clover mixes. This can provide additional attraction and nutrition into the winter, and can be used as hunting plots during the season. By spring the clover and grain is very attractive to turkeys.

Look on the QDMA website, and watch their video on low-impact/no-till planting of summer plots. Spraying with glyphosate (safely according to label) and then closely mowing the dry stubble provides a great seedbed for small seeds such as the deer vetch, and allows the natural organic matter to remain, conserving nutrients and moisture. (A soil test and adding the appropriate fertilizer and/or lime is always best.) Broadcasting just before a forecasted rain event allows the seed to work down to the soil, and great germination can be achieved without heavy equipment or the associated expense.

For instance, at our home I sprayed and mowed our 1/3 acre clover/oat plot in late April (after some successful turkey hunting!). I applied 0-20-20 fertilizer (legumes do not need Nitrogen), and the test showed I did not need lime this time. Right before a good series of showers, I used a hand spreader to broadcast about 8#'s of Aschenomene. That's all; no tractors, no discing, no diesel fuel. Truly only 30 minutes of zero-turn mower work and glyphosate spraying, waited for the weather report to be right, and then 15 minutes of walking around the plot with a hand spreader.
That was 5 weeks ago and the deer are in the plot eating 24/7; I watch them from my kitchen window 100 yards away. They keep the plot low, but they love the new growth.
We also planted deer vetch at our club 100 miles away, with traditional plowing, spraying, cultipacking, and a grain drill as we manage 7000 acres of bottomland. My home plot came out just about as well as the ones down there. (Note: the vetch survived two river floods being underwater for several days at a time.)
Bow season begins here in September (gun season begins at our club in August), and both areas will have heavy deer utilization of our summer plots during the early season. Vetch dies immediately after the first frost.

Most cool-season plots are traditional hunting plots... keep the does interested in a dependable food source and at the right time the bucks will be coming by to check them out. A high-attraction grain like wheat or oats, or a mix of grain and clovers or even brassicas serves the purpose very well. Broadcasting or no-tilling grains into the summer food plot just before it begins to die back will keep the plot green and attractive without having to kill it and plow it up and then plant...that prevents the deer from having to find other food sources while they wait on your fall plot to germinate.

Some plots can truly be year-round sources of nutrition; some of the perennial clovers can work well. The maintenance required to control weeds and mow to keep them attractive over the full year can rival the costs of replanting annual plots, so do the math and compare. Many annual plants will provide higher biomass and nutrition over the same period as the perennials, and the annuals grow much faster.

Almost nothing provides more total biomass than early successional native growth...again, check out Dr. Harper's book.

Sorry for the essay. I didn't have much else to do this morning: I'm kind stuck at home for little while longer after my surprise heart attack and bypass surgery last month! The boat is back in the barn after missing our annual Keys trip, and my buddies at the club are taking care of my stands and plots down there, so I'm chained to my recliner when I'm not walking the pasture in the evenings when it's a bit cooler.

P.S. Check out the QDMA and Craig Harper's book.
Old 07-10-2020, 12:47 PM
  #30  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Tarpon Springs, FL
Posts: 8,672
Received 4,073 Likes on 2,315 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Beasdoc View Post
deep discing to kill the non-native grasses and encourage the growth of forbs can be a great alternative to food plots.
Just an FYI but if he's in SE GA he could be dealing with Cogon grass and discing it would be a serious mistake. It needs to be sprayed with an approved herbicide twice a year for 2 years before tilling and replanting with a native grass.

https://www.invasive.org/101/cogongrass.cfm
Old 07-10-2020, 07:20 PM
  #31  
Senior MemberPLEDGERPLEDGERCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: ATL & SAV
Posts: 12,371
Received 2,007 Likes on 990 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by Beasdoc View Post
Lots of great ideas here...each of us has had our successes and failures and our favorite plot choices.

The QDMA website has dozens of food plot articles to browse and get ideas, and their Food Plot Book has great regionally-appropriate planting mix recommendations. An evening of reading online on in-book is worth it.
Dr Craig Harper from U of Tenn also has done some GREAT work on food plots, and, like some here on THT, is a big proponent of early successional natural growth to provide a high quality high biomass inexpensive nutritional source. For many areas, periodic prescribed fire or deep discing to kill the non-native grasses and encourage the growth of forbs can be a great alternative to food plots. Check out Dr Harper's book on Early Successional Growth for deer.

The OP has a basic question: what food plot species would be good for that particular high moisture spot in SE Georgia; and some great ideas have been provided.

It is true that a single 1/4 acre plot will not provide any significant additional nutrition, but it can be an attraction plot for viewing hunting, or encouraging deer to spend more time on your property, and with other food plots on the property can be a big part of providing what the deer want and need. The choice of what to plant there or even IF to plant at all depends on many factors; available equipment, cost, accessibility, purpose, etc.

Warm season (May-September) plots can provide additional nutrition at a critical late-summer time when natural forage may be dry and tough. Summer plots can also lessen the need for fertilizer for the fall plot if they are mowed or plowed prior to fall planting. Warm season plots are often legumes such as beans, peas, deer vetch (all very high-quality nutrition with very high attraction), and others. 1/4 acre of beans of peas is not large enough to withstand the browsing of even a few deer, that's why I use deer vetch (Aschenomene)...they hammer it but the new growth is still tender and attractive to them.
Most warm season plots are followed up by cool season plots, usually grain or grain-annual clover mixes. This can provide additional attraction and nutrition into the winter, and can be used as hunting plots during the season. By spring the clover and grain is very attractive to turkeys.

Look on the QDMA website, and watch their video on low-impact/no-till planting of summer plots. Spraying with glyphosate (safely according to label) and then closely mowing the dry stubble provides a great seedbed for small seeds such as the deer vetch, and allows the natural organic matter to remain, conserving nutrients and moisture. (A soil test and adding the appropriate fertilizer and/or lime is always best.) Broadcasting just before a forecasted rain event allows the seed to work down to the soil, and great germination can be achieved without heavy equipment or the associated expense.

For instance, at our home I sprayed and mowed our 1/3 acre clover/oat plot in late April (after some successful turkey hunting!). I applied 0-20-20 fertilizer (legumes do not need Nitrogen), and the test showed I did not need lime this time. Right before a good series of showers, I used a hand spreader to broadcast about 8#'s of Aschenomene. That's all; no tractors, no discing, no diesel fuel. Truly only 30 minutes of zero-turn mower work and glyphosate spraying, waited for the weather report to be right, and then 15 minutes of walking around the plot with a hand spreader.
That was 5 weeks ago and the deer are in the plot eating 24/7; I watch them from my kitchen window 100 yards away. They keep the plot low, but they love the new growth.
We also planted deer vetch at our club 100 miles away, with traditional plowing, spraying, cultipacking, and a grain drill as we manage 7000 acres of bottomland. My home plot came out just about as well as the ones down there. (Note: the vetch survived two river floods being underwater for several days at a time.)
Bow season begins here in September (gun season begins at our club in August), and both areas will have heavy deer utilization of our summer plots during the early season. Vetch dies immediately after the first frost.

Most cool-season plots are traditional hunting plots... keep the does interested in a dependable food source and at the right time the bucks will be coming by to check them out. A high-attraction grain like wheat or oats, or a mix of grain and clovers or even brassicas serves the purpose very well. Broadcasting or no-tilling grains into the summer food plot just before it begins to die back will keep the plot green and attractive without having to kill it and plow it up and then plant...that prevents the deer from having to find other food sources while they wait on your fall plot to germinate.

Some plots can truly be year-round sources of nutrition; some of the perennial clovers can work well. The maintenance required to control weeds and mow to keep them attractive over the full year can rival the costs of replanting annual plots, so do the math and compare. Many annual plants will provide higher biomass and nutrition over the same period as the perennials, and the annuals grow much faster.

Almost nothing provides more total biomass than early successional native growth...again, check out Dr. Harper's book.

Sorry for the essay. I didn't have much else to do this morning: I'm kind stuck at home for little while longer after my surprise heart attack and bypass surgery last month! The boat is back in the barn after missing our annual Keys trip, and my buddies at the club are taking care of my stands and plots down there, so I'm chained to my recliner when I'm not walking the pasture in the evenings when it's a bit cooler.

P.S. Check out the QDMA and Craig Harper's book.
Your detailed response deserves a thank you....thanks. Hope you recover quickly.
Old 07-10-2020, 07:23 PM
  #32  
Senior MemberPLEDGERPLEDGERCaptains Club Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: ATL & SAV
Posts: 12,371
Received 2,007 Likes on 990 Posts
Default

Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
Just an FYI but if he's in SE GA he could be dealing with Cogon grass and discing it would be a serious mistake. It needs to be sprayed with an approved herbicide twice a year for 2 years before tilling and replanting with a native grass.

https://www.invasive.org/101/cogongrass.cfm
I haven't seen anything that looks like cogongrass.

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright © 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.