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Oil Rig Careers

Old 01-08-2020, 08:06 AM
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Default Oil Rig Careers

My wife and I will be relocating to the Mississippi coast in 2021 and we have a 20 year old son that is looking for a change in employment, so I'm doing some research along with him to see what kind of opinions we can gather regarding a career on the oil rigs. Being from Georgia, he obviously has no experience in rigs, but is young, intelligent and fit.

Any opinions???? LOL
Old 01-08-2020, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by steveshall View Post
My wife and I will be relocating to the Mississippi coast in 2021 and we have a 20 year old son that is looking for a change in employment, so I'm doing some research along with him to see what kind of opinions we can gather regarding a career on the oil rigs. Being from Georgia, he obviously has no experience in rigs, but is young, intelligent and fit.

Any opinions???? LOL
The oil industry on the Gulf Coast is huge! Chemical plants, natural gas plants, refineries, and oil rigs offshore.

There’s a local Community College on the MS Gulf Coast that offers a 2 year degree for Operations or Maintenance that is fairly cheap and has all the inside tracks on getting a job with a lot of the big companies such as Shell, Exxon, Chevron....

If this is something he may be potentially interested in, feel free to send me a PM.
Old 01-08-2020, 08:19 AM
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those boys can make alot of money! but they work there ass off and earn it!

its my understanding its very strict about starting as low man on the list then EARN your way up the ladder! if they dont work as a team, it puts everyone at risk! gotta earn the respect!
Old 01-08-2020, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Rolandt03 View Post
those boys can make alot of money! but they work there ass off and earn it!

its my understanding its very strict about starting as low man on the list then EARN your way up the ladder! if they dont work as a team, it puts everyone at risk! gotta earn the respect!
He's full out on "team work". That was the main reason I had him in sports while he was growing up. A lot of parents out there look to have their children become a professional athlete. You need to be a little more realistic and let it teach them life skills. Team Work, being a good teammate, LOSING and winning, competitiveness. These are the tools for success.
Old 01-08-2020, 08:28 AM
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Originally Posted by slow mocean View Post
The oil industry on the Gulf Coast is huge! Chemical plants, natural gas plants, refineries, and oil rigs offshore.

There’s a local Community College on the MS Gulf Coast that offers a 2 year degree for Operations or Maintenance that is fairly cheap and has all the inside tracks on getting a job with a lot of the big companies such as Shell, Exxon, Chevron....

If this is something he may be potentially interested in, feel free to send me a PM.
Thank you very much! I'll be talking with him in the next couple days and will have him contact you.
Old 01-08-2020, 08:29 AM
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Pasagoula has the chevron refinery along with a ship yard lots of jobs.

Chemors is Delilse, old DuPont plant makes paint pigment.

the port in gulport has some different companies.

The port in Hancock county has a pipe plant(jindal tubular), DAK(formerly GE plastics) and a few other employers. NASA also has a test site with contractors.

Most the offshore oil work is base out of different cities in LA not that far of a drive.

Passing a drug test is the major requirement. Surprising the number of people who can't pass.



Old 01-08-2020, 08:36 AM
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Wouldn't hurt to ask this question in the Gulf Coast forum. Lots of guys posting in there actually work in the field you are asking about.
Old 01-08-2020, 08:37 AM
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great idea. TY
Old 01-08-2020, 08:45 AM
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I know this is a different route, but my wife's father was a lineman for 30 yrs. He now teaches classes on it. They can't find enough good young men. Those guys are being paid well and usually have very good benefits. You can also use that skill anywhere in the world so you're not limited by your job on where you can live. Just a thought.
Old 01-08-2020, 08:53 AM
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I was flying back from a wedding in Rio several years ago. Sitting in the first class airport lounge for United. Everybody except for my family was oil workers flying back to Houston. Some white collar, some blue collar. All seemed to have bought retirement homes in Buenos Aires. They mostly worked 28 day on/off contracts with Petrograd, or whatever it is. Hard work, great money. Not for everybody, but not a bad career choice at all if you don't want 9-5 in a cubicle farm somewhere.
Old 01-08-2020, 08:59 AM
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Originally Posted by steveshall View Post
My wife and I will be relocating to the Mississippi coast in 2021 and we have a 20 year old son that is looking for a change in employment, so I'm doing some research along with him to see what kind of opinions we can gather regarding a career on the oil rigs. Being from Georgia, he obviously has no experience in rigs, but is young, intelligent and fit.

Any opinions???? LOL
He might also want to look into Airbus in Mobile.
Old 01-08-2020, 09:13 AM
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Don't look offshore. Plenty of qualified people can't find work down there and the pay sucks. The rigs on land may be better and more stable, but I'm not sure. The oil boom offshore is done for a few more years.
Old 01-08-2020, 09:30 AM
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Have him get a 2 year electronics degree with heavy emphasis on industrial automation. I work in this field and travel to many steel, aluminum, and paper mills around the country and they are ALL hiring electrical guys. I'm sure the oil rigs need them too. He would be making over 6 figures within a couple of years. There is a Kimberly-Clark tissue mill in Mobile and Outukampou (stainless steel) has a huge facility not far away. I'm sure there are others
Old 01-08-2020, 09:44 AM
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Slinging iron! Roghnecking!

I did it back in the late 70's working drill rigs and work over rigs in Wyoming met a lot of good folks - not all some kinda shady - running from something. Lots of drugs and that sort of thing so you gotta watch out.

Best times I had. I did work hard but it didn't bother me. I made a shart ton of money between hourly/per diem and hazard pay (H2S wells)

Young mans game though. I realized it after a few years and left to go back to school for what I do now for a living - sitting in a cubical 8 - 10 hours a day . Great to make/bank some cash if you can find work over rig gigs without week on week off and work bookooh hours or casing crew to load up on some savings.


tssss all though just about to hang up the daily routine.

I wouldn't recommend roughnecking for a career based on my experience and the era I did - might be different now, but I doubt it based on what I saw. There are probably better paths to a career in the Gulf area.

Side note. I did get my oldest in the patch up in ND in 14' & 16' working summers between University semesters. Sheez it was great to get back into Carhart jacket and cruise the patch even if it wasn't for me. Smell of that diesel and the atmosphere. I miss it.

Might go out this summer just to hire on for a few months and prove I can get back in the derrick and run pipe in and out of the ground.
Old 01-08-2020, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Vitamin_Sea View Post
Have him get a 2 year electronics degree with heavy emphasis on industrial automation. I work in this field and travel to many steel, aluminum, and paper mills around the country and they are ALL hiring electrical guys. I'm sure the oil rigs need them too. He would be making over 6 figures within a couple of years. There is a Kimberly-Clark tissue mill in Mobile and Outukampou (stainless steel) has a huge facility not far away. I'm sure there are others

Good stuff right here.
Old 01-08-2020, 09:53 AM
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Originally Posted by Matt Evans View Post
I was flying back from a wedding in Rio several years ago. Sitting in the first class airport lounge for United. Everybody except for my family was oil workers flying back to Houston. Some white collar, some blue collar. All seemed to have bought retirement homes in Buenos Aires. They mostly worked 28 day on/off contracts with Petrograd, or whatever it is. Hard work, great money. Not for everybody, but not a bad career choice at all if you don't want 9-5 in a cubicle farm somewhere.
What you don't see is that 90% of them are divorced, it is tough on a family to be gone half the year.
Old 01-08-2020, 09:54 AM
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I apologize in advance for the derail.

When those guys are on the rigs do they ever drop baits or jigs over the side....see what’s lurking below?
Old 01-08-2020, 10:03 AM
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Originally Posted by Hooper View Post
I apologize in advance for the derail.

When those guys are on the rigs do they ever drop baits or jigs over the side....see what’s lurking below?
Yes, they have a few poles on rigs and fish on occasion, a lot of time providing dinner that evening.
Old 01-08-2020, 10:10 AM
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Originally Posted by steveshall View Post
My wife and I will be relocating to the Mississippi coast in 2021 and we have a 20 year old son that is looking for a change in employment, so I'm doing some research along with him to see what kind of opinions we can gather regarding a career on the oil rigs. Being from Georgia, he obviously has no experience in rigs, but is young, intelligent and fit.

Any opinions???? LOL
I work in the industry, just not offshore (yet). I am currently working the Vaca Muerte field in Argentina, but have been everywhere from Colorado (starting point) to the Bakken to Texas in the last 12 years, and I supported most anywhere in the US until my move.

I would suggest electronics and industrial automation as well, but also have a good IT understanding/background as that is the way oil/gas companies are moving. We are automating to do more with less, much of which is AI/Analytics based. Gone are the days of operators knowing only well operations and will soon be needing a degree in computer science.

If he wants to be in the office environment, have him study cloud based stuff as we are moving in that direction as well. IT security, Cloud, Mobile apps, etc...

Hope that helps and I wish him luck. Keep in mind, the Oil/Gas industry is pretty volatile, so it's good to pick something that can go anywhere (unlike me! HAHA)... Automation is used in everything from power and water plants to disney world and other factories... never enough of those guys to go around at times.
Old 01-08-2020, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by mytime View Post
I know this is a different route, but my wife's father was a lineman for 30 yrs. He now teaches classes on it. They can't find enough good young men. Those guys are being paid well and usually have very good benefits. You can also use that skill anywhere in the world so you're not limited by your job on where you can live. Just a thought.
these guys don't get laid off when oil prices drop

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