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What would you use to repair this hole

Old 12-18-2019, 08:46 AM
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Default What would you use to repair this hole

Good morning, I just skim-coated my garage because the walls were disgusting. Still need to sand but the previous owner put the fill-a-crack expanding foam everywhere, even small cracks. I hate the look and removed all of it, with the skim coating taking care of most of the cracks but now I still have these:

1. Biggish hole in corner of garage ceiling. Ceiling is drywall, walls are concrete. Can't just put a mesh drywall patch here, and it's too big for mesh tape and compound. Would like to avoid the fill-a-crack foam.


2. Cracks between concrete walls and floor. Most of the cracks are less than 1/2'' but this one is over 3/4". I don't think I can simply use caulk. Also looking for suggestions on type of caulk for the smaller cracks.

Old 12-18-2019, 09:00 AM
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Cut a drywall patch for the larger hole from a quarter sheet of board. Screw in a wood backer and screw the patch to the backer.

Backer rod and caulk for the large gap in the base. I always liked 1100A from Sherwin Williams.
Old 12-18-2019, 09:00 AM
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I would cut the ceiling whole out neatly, then add a plywood furring strip above and then put a new piece of gyp over that. Tape & Mud.

For the gaps, it it is concrete to concrete, you can use grout to fill it in and for the smaller stuff, use a good elastomeric caulk like NP-1 or something.
Old 12-18-2019, 09:05 AM
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Question?

If you have a concrete slab and block walls why are the walls lifting up away from the slab???
That's telling a LOT of what was more than likely done in the construction of the structure.

Got a bull dozer?

Standing by for this one.
Old 12-18-2019, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Riptied View Post
Question?

If you have a concrete slab and block walls why are the walls lifting up away from the slab???
That's telling a LOT of what was more than likely done in the construction of the structure.

Got a bull dozer?

Standing by for this one.
I was concerned about this too. I was googling it and apparently it's normal according to this website below. Not sure why the gap is that big though. "A poured concrete slab shrinks away from its perimeter - the building's foundation walls. You will see this shrinkage of even a perfect concrete floor slab with no visible cracks elsewhere in the field of its surface if the floor was poured inside of an existing foundation.

Look for the gap between the edges of the slab and the foundation wall? Look also for the stains or concrete debris on the wall at the slab level? These confirm that at the time the slab was poured it was touching the wall."


Old 12-18-2019, 09:25 AM
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Originally Posted by Riptied View Post
Question?

If you have a concrete slab and block walls why are the walls lifting up away from the slab???
That's telling a LOT of what was more than likely done in the construction of the structure.

Got a bull dozer?

Standing by for this one.
Drywall is not hung tight to the concrete because it will wick moisture.

If you need to cover the gap consider a piece of trim, sealed on all sides.
Old 12-18-2019, 09:34 AM
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Agree about the DW and location of installation.

Before I stick my foot in my mouth what year was that structure built? Was it permitted, inspected and passed/signed off on?
Old 12-18-2019, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Riptied View Post
Question?

If you have a concrete slab and block walls why are the walls lifting up away from the slab???
That's telling a LOT of what was more than likely done in the construction of the structure.

Got a bull dozer?

Standing by for this one.

The slab is dropping, not the walls lifting...
Old 12-18-2019, 09:38 AM
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Looks like a floating slab & should have had an expansion joint originally abutting the concrete (block with stucco?) walls that are on their own footers below ground
Old 12-18-2019, 09:40 AM
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The house was built in 1990, South Florida, stucco. I'll take the advice here and get a little piece of drywall for the ceiling. For the floor, backer rod into the crack and then what type of caulk? I'm sure DAP has something but it needs to be specific to concrete.
Old 12-18-2019, 09:41 AM
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FlexSeal it... lol
Old 12-18-2019, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Flybull View Post
The slab is dropping, not the walls lifting...
Sink Hole?

Still, and off all places Miami has the strictest / toughest building codes in the nation.

Every block residence I've ever had a hand in building or seen built has always had rebar sticking out of the slab about every 4' and certain block cells filled with concrete locking it all together.

Not there and maybe the OP is seeing something different but I would be concerned about that and have a professional inspect it and the structures foundation.
May be more than what you think.
Make sure your HO insurance is paid and up to date before you get this inspected.

Keep us updated.
Old 12-18-2019, 09:50 AM
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As others had said backer rod & caulk - You want elastomeric caulk - Lot to choose from - check this out:

https://www.dap.com/dap-products-ph/...meric-sealant/
Old 12-18-2019, 12:16 PM
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Informative thread.
Old 12-18-2019, 01:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Riptied View Post
Sink Hole?

Still, and off all places Miami has the strictest / toughest building codes in the nation.

Every block residence I've ever had a hand in building or seen built has always had rebar sticking out of the slab about every 4' and certain block cells filled with concrete locking it all together.

Not there and maybe the OP is seeing something different but I would be concerned about that and have a professional inspect it and the structures foundation.
May be more than what you think.
Make sure your HO insurance is paid and up to date before you get this inspected.

Keep us updated.
Hard to tell from just that pic of the corner, but looks like it is a regular footing for the block wall, and the slab on grade is poured within this footer/wall. If that is the case, the footer is holding the structure load fine, but the slab has settled out a bit. Not a big deal, but it may continue to go down over time, rendering this "fix" needing more "fixing" later on. Without seeing the walls of the structure, I can't tell if the footer and wall are good or not.

To not only raise the floor slab, but also stabilize the rest of it from ever dropping in the future, find a polyurethane foam company that does this sort of work and it is relatively inexpensive to have poly injected under to stabilize the slab. 1/2" holes every 6' approx. so not too intrusive. DO NOT use mud-jacking... waste of $$ and you're adding more weight, causing the compounding of the problem. Poly has almost zero weight.

By the way... homeowners insurance WILL NOT cover any foundation related failures for your home. None.
Old 12-18-2019, 01:49 PM
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Originally Posted by skibum View Post
Drywall is not hung tight to the concrete because it will wick moisture.

If you need to cover the gap consider a piece of trim, sealed on all sides.
Would agree with this....

I would not be tearing down the house just yet.

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