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Electric car is not for you

Old 11-08-2019, 03:25 AM
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Originally Posted by high life View Post
They also pay no tax on fuel which most states use for road improvements.
guaranteed that will change
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Old 11-08-2019, 04:36 AM
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I always find these debates funny. An electric car wonít work for some, just like a Honda Civic wonít work for some. If they donít work for you, donít buy it.

itís not all about being green for many itís just cool tech like a new iPhone. By every accord if you want to be green, donít buy a new car period. The amount of bad crap that goes into the mfg process offsets any gains of an electric or other car.

in regard to the govt subsidies, that is a valid point. But Iíd rather subsidize something which gives us energy independence, then keep giving corn growers billions for putting crap in my gas tanks and making my life hard. Btw I have never seen free charging stations. Maybe they exist, but usually you have to pay.

i do like the idea of a car with almost zero maintenance, cool features and never going to a gas station. Plugin at home once or twice a week and drive. Take the truck on the weekends.
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Old 11-08-2019, 05:09 AM
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At the present time it is easy to find a gasoline station, when you get low there is always a gasoline station close by. Not so much for electric vehicles, it takes too much planning to figure out where to recharge, particularly if you don't have a garage where you can keep the car in the evening.
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Old 11-08-2019, 05:17 AM
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Originally Posted by SeaJay View Post
At the present time it is easy to find a gasoline station, when you get low there is always a gasoline station close by. Not so much for electric vehicles, it takes too much planning to figure out where to recharge, particularly if you don't have a garage where you can keep the car in the evening.
Tesla actually plans all of that for you.

Plug in your route and it maps out all of the charging stations you will need to hit, tells you how long you will have to charge, and how many people are charging.

A friend owns one, doesn’t have a garage in his old house... charges outside overnight.

We live in rural farm county, he gets around just fine with limited charging g stations.
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Old 11-08-2019, 06:35 AM
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In order for recharging electric cars to be as quick, simple and ubiquitous as refueling gasoline cars, it seems that one of two things needs to happen. Either all the electric car manufacturers need to standardize on a battery technology so standardized charging stations can be built nationwide (it's too soon to do that) or the unique optimal charging technology required for a particular carmaker's proprietary batteries needs to be built into the car so that charging can be done at generic electric outlets (which would add to the cost of building an electric car). The latter could be implemented much sooner, as the ubiquitous slow charging part of that approach is already in place. It's the ubiquitous fast charging part that's missing.
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Old 11-08-2019, 06:37 AM
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I could actually live with one just fine. I drive 60 miles a day to and from work, and whatever I drive at lunch and after work. That would fit in the range, and plug it in over night. Have a truck for the towing and long distance stuff.

For me the issue is price and infrastructure. I commute in a midsize German sedan - 32mpg, fun to drive, and if you shop you can buy two years old for mid 20ís. And I have the option to travel in it if I donít need truck space or towing. But down the road if pricing comes down, technology advances, and infrastructure improves Iíd certainly consider it.

The only constant in life is change . . .
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Old 11-08-2019, 06:46 AM
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Originally Posted by RyanL11 View Post
600 miles of range? You'd need a vehicle to drive 60 mph for 10 hours straight?
hell no, 75 MPH for 8 hours. Get out of my lane.
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Old 11-08-2019, 06:54 AM
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The e-car tech is still new and developing. The cost, range, limited charging stations, and long charge times are the limiting factors right now. I think the range may get a bit better, but probably not by much. The cost will come down some as batt mfr gets more efficient. More charging stations are being built, It still will take longer to charge these things by a long shot compared to filling a gas tank.

But there is lots of promise in this tech. The numbers simply work compared to a gas car,

They are not very good for long range travel right now, and probably will not be very good even in five years. But 90% of car travel is local enough that they would shine. That 10% long travel will still be a bitch. Will have to plan an hour break to charge. Or take a gas car.

Right now all the e-cars are loaded with bling to get buyers and to hide the battery cost in a big price tag. As batt costs come down, there will be decent cars coming on the market with less bling (they can still make a profit then) and may be cost competitive with normal gassers.

This tech is not going to work for trucks, except for local deliveries and local work trucks. Towing anything any distance, driving any distance, forget it. Those tall modern 4dr trucks are aero bricks and the range will suck.

But cars, it can work. I could see getting one for local beating around and keep a gas car and truck for when the e-car is the wrong tool for the job.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:16 AM
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Originally Posted by buxa View Post
I seem to recall Honda and Toyota are or were producing cars that run on hydrogen, which has almost a limitless supply. Lets see.
Where do you find all this "limitless supply" of Hydrogen??

It doesn't exist. While Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe, here on Earth it's usually tied up in some other molecules, like water or some hydrocarbon. You can use electrolysis to extract it from water, but that's pretty expensive. Most of it comes from refining natural gas. Overall, it would actually be more efficient to just run the IC engine on natural gas.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:20 AM
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Originally Posted by Jughed View Post


Tesla actually plans all of that for you.

Plug in your route and it maps out all of the charging stations you will need to hit, tells you how long you will have to charge, and how many people are charging.

A friend owns one, doesnít have a garage in his old house... charges outside overnight.

We live in rural farm county, he gets around just fine with limited charging g stations.
Yesyes it can be done if you're determined to do it. But it's a lot easier with gasoline stations.
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:21 AM
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Originally Posted by millennium View Post
How do electric cars produce heat in winter for occupants?
Major battery drain?
Not only that, but you use battery energy to cool in the summer. A hot day? Stuck in traffic?
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Old 11-08-2019, 07:50 AM
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Originally Posted by km1125 View Post
Where do you find all this "limitless supply" of Hydrogen??

It doesn't exist. While Hydrogen is the most common element in the universe, here on Earth it's usually tied up in some other molecules, like water or some hydrocarbon. You can use electrolysis to extract it from water, but that's pretty expensive. Most of it comes from refining natural gas. Overall, it would actually be more efficient to just run the IC engine on natural gas.
I read somewhere they were extracting it from seawater? Or as you said from gas, which will probably still need. Gas (LPG in Europe) has been around for a long time, it is being pushed more now than ever with the fuel being around 40% cheaper than gasoline.
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by buxa View Post
I read somewhere they were extracting it from seawater? Or as you said from gas, which will probably still need. Gas (LPG in Europe) has been around for a long time, it is being pushed more now than ever with the fuel being around 40% cheaper than gasoline.
You can get hydrogen out of any water at all...it's just that it takes more energy to split hydrogen out of water than you get back when you use it as fuel. It's essentially being used as a battery: you run tons of energy into water, split the H2 off the 0, then later, you reattach the O when you burn it and that process gives off energy. But no system is perfectly sealed so there's always going to be energy losses along the way.

On top of that, it's such a tiny element, physically, that sealing up hydrogen systems is pretty difficult. A guy I used to work with did some stuff for Ballard, one of the pioneer hydrogen cell companies...it's not easy stuff to work with.

So basically, hydrogen is like a battery that evaporates and explodes if put in contact with even tiny amounts of fire, or blimps.
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
hell no, 75 MPH for 8 hours. Get out of my lane.
You can drive 75 mph without ever hitting traffic or stopping? Interesting...
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:25 AM
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But is it really green technology?????
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by JJ LYNN View Post
But is it really green technology?????
Strip mining for lithium? Fossil fuel to make electricity?

It's not...but for some it makes them feel better.
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by LongIslandFisherman View Post
Electric is here to stay.

The gas engine had its day.

Yes, there will still be some new gas engine cars produced, but their production peak is in the rear view mirror.

2020 to 2022 Ö it is ALL about Batteries. Weight, cost, range, recharge time and total life.

The winners will get those 5 factors...the most "right".
Has anyone told the electricity producers this?

Are we ramping up coal, gas or nuclear plants?

What are we going to do with the increased waste?

Have you done the math of your increased electricity bill?
Surely those charging stations won't continue to be paid by the taxpayer? Or will they?

The math is hard to do because we're not sure where the power is coming from, the method, or the increased cost along with the increased price because of demand.

One to three years seems to be a reasonable time to phase from gas/diesel to electric fuel. Yea. Ok.
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Old 11-08-2019, 08:52 AM
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I can see the charging stations being a bit like ATMS.

First, they were free but hard to find.

Then, they started adding nominal user/usage fees and they were everywhere. Then they added larger fees but folks were already stuck on using them.

Can you imagine what the ACTUAL cost of electric is going to be down the road a bit when you have to buy through a charging station vs charging at home? I can pretty much guarantee that it will be a substantial premium over the costs you're paying at home.
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:05 AM
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E cars make sense where distances people drive are short, like in Europe, Canada and the US, not so much, ever think of strapping a generator to the trunk lid? Problem with range solved, thank you....
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Old 11-08-2019, 10:16 AM
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Originally Posted by RyanL11 View Post
You can drive 75 mph without ever hitting traffic or stopping? Interesting...
Have you considered less caffeine? And no you just have to go around the left lane nannies. And you wouldn't want to run the vehicle out of charge before getting to where you're going so I would assume about 90% of full charge as usable.

In my opinion, given current technology, only a plug-in hybrid makes sense except for local trips.
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