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Superfluous Language and Anguished English

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Superfluous Language and Anguished English

Old 09-11-2019, 06:19 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by Knoxes View Post
I'm gonna take this opportunity to note that almost everyone in America now pronounces "for" as "fer". It's weird.
I have noticed that the younger generation speaks with an unusually choppy rhythm with unnatural breaks.

Say this:

Brayden didn't enjoy his vacation in Sweden.

When today's younger generation speaks that it will sound like:

Bray den di dent en joy his vacation in Swe den.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
I

Many of you will try to be cute in your response. You'll fail. You'll be trite and boring.

.
Originally Posted by Lone Ranger View Post
So,I really don't care how someone writes, Going forward, as long as they get the point across it doesn't matter to Me.was going to ax You a question,..nevermind...
Man, I am good at this.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:22 AM
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This could be a long thread.

It's is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.” Its is a possessive determiner we use to say that something belongs to or refers to something

You don't say I brought my dog to the vet last week for it's rabies shot. You say I took my dog to the vet last week for its rabies shot.

Last edited by Qb1rdman; 09-11-2019 at 08:18 AM.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:23 AM
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I would just like to highlight that I now know what my buddies that are Navy vets are talking about when they say the "coasties are uppity."
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:23 AM
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Geezus, so. Is it winter yet?
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Qb1rdman View Post
This could be a long thread.

It's is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.” Its is a possessive determiner we use to say that something belongs to or refers to something

You don't say I brought my dog to the vet last week for it's rabies shot. You say You say I took my dog to the vet last week for its rabies shot.
When I was at the Lake of the Ozarks a few weeks ago, I picked up a few real estate flyers. Most of the realtors used "lakefront living at it's finest."

Lakefront living at it is finest?
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:26 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
I would just like to highlight that I now know what my buddies that are Navy vets are talking about when they say the "coasties are uppity."
They should be grateful that we kept their wives happy while they were deployed.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:29 AM
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Can English feel anguish?
I have often suffered anguish over the improper use of English.
You have chosen a particularly difficult row to hoe but you're sure to be standing in tall cotton soon.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:29 AM
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soooooo . . . when I seen this thread I had a feeling it's would go this way

here's a few unnecessary commas for ya

,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:30 AM
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Originally Posted by autobaun70 View Post
I would just like to highlight that I now know what my buddies that are Navy vets are talking about when they say the "coasties are uppity."
faf
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:33 AM
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But......................I am already at the vet.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:38 AM
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The word “so” has many different uses and definitions. You can look those up. Used as a adverb it can be used in place of “therefore,thus, and subsequently”. Using “so” to start a sentence in that manner is not incorrect.

“I ran out of gas. So, I tried to start my boat and it wouldn’t crank. “

In the informal setting it replaces more formal therefor thus and subsequently well. So, I will keep using it even if it pisses some people off.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:42 AM
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Do not regularly start sentences with "so."

Originally Posted by mwgoldman View Post
The word “so” has many different uses and definitions. You can look those up. Used as a adverb it can be used in place of “therefore,thus, and subsequently”. Using “so” to start a sentence in that manner is not incorrect.

“I ran out of gas. So, I tried to start my boat and it wouldn’t crank. “

In the informal setting it replaces more formal therefor thus and subsequently well. So, I will keep using it even if it pisses some people off.
Italics added for emphasis. The word randomly may have been a better choice.

Do we need to have a discussion about when to use a comma before a conjunction when separating independent clauses?

Last edited by Paul Barnard; 09-11-2019 at 06:52 AM.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:45 AM
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Meh...
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:48 AM
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I brung my dog to da vet yesterday,

Last edited by 4/0; 09-11-2019 at 07:10 AM. Reason: Proper wording
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:51 AM
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So like, don't forget to use "like" at least three times in every sentence. Guy in front of me on the plane was yapping to his female co-worker the whole time. I started counting the number of times he said "like". When I got to 50, I leaned around the side of his seat back and said, "fifty". Then again for 100, and 200. At that point, he finally said, "huh?" This only took 10 minutes. I told him that is how many times he said "like". I swear, he like said it like 200 times in like ten minutes.
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Old 09-11-2019, 06:58 AM
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😂

So, I’m impressed with your sentence structure......oh my.
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Old 09-11-2019, 07:07 AM
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Originally Posted by Fish Haid View Post
So like, don't forget to use "like" at least three times in every sentence. Guy in front of me on the plane was yapping to his female co-worker the whole time. I started counting the number of times he said "like". When I got to 50, I leaned around the side of his seat back and said, "fifty". Then again for 100, and 200. At that point, he finally said, "huh?" This only took 10 minutes. I told him that is how many times he said "like". I swear, he like said it like 200 times in like ten minutes.
I did almost that very thing one time, but I counted each one out loud. I got to seventeen before the guy said "what are you doing?"
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Old 09-11-2019, 07:10 AM
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Here's another one. "Try and."

I am going to try and educate the marginally literate members of this forum.

No.

I am going to try to...the members of the forum.
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Old 09-11-2019, 07:15 AM
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Originally Posted by Paul Barnard View Post
Ellipsis.

An ellipsis is a series of three, and only three, dots. It serves two functions. It can stand in the place of omitted language when the omitted language would be easily understood. In informal writing it can be used to represent a pause or a shift in thought. In that case it should be used only when a comma or period doesn't serve well.
Should any of you doubt the need for this discussion.

7 Cops called and lectures man for wasting resources because he carries....
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