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Modern, yet ancient, farm crop

Old 06-10-2019, 06:57 PM
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lps
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Default Modern, yet ancient, farm crop

I've got 3 acres of cannabis growing in the field beside my house:



I know what you're thinking, but it's O'Dweeds, man!

It's "industrial hemp", which merely means that it's a low THC (.3% or less by dry weight), high CBD strain of "marijuana." It's recently planted (about a week ago) from re-rooted cuttings, and will be USDA Certified Organic. It's being grown with a hemp permit. About a thousand pounds of it are already under contract with a company that extracts the oil. They pay based on the percentage of CBD in the harvested crop. The rest will probably be sold as "bud" by the pound, or fraction thereof (probably down to eighth ounce packages). It will all be tested by a laboratory to ensure that it is at or below .3% Thc. If it exceeds that threshold, the entire crop has to be destroyed.

It's my wife's and my land, but not our crop (we rent some farmland to a buddy of mine, who's farming it under USDA organic practices.) I'm excited to watch this crop grow! There was a time in my life when I dreamt of living in the middle of a big pot field!
Old 06-10-2019, 07:05 PM
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Twist us one up bro!
Old 06-10-2019, 07:10 PM
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You ever consider conservation tillage?
Old 06-10-2019, 07:12 PM
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Originally Posted by lps View Post
I've got 3 acres of cannabis growing in the field beside my house:



I know what you're thinking, but it's O'Dweeds, man!

It's "industrial hemp", which merely means that it's a low THC (.3% or less by dry weight), high CBD strain of "marijuana." It's recently planted (about a week ago) from re-rooted cuttings, and will be USDA Certified Organic. It's being grown with a hemp permit. About a thousand pounds of it are already under contract with a company that extracts the oil. They pay based on the percentage of CBD in the harvested crop. The rest will probably be sold as "bud" by the pound, or fraction thereof (probably down to eighth ounce packages). It will all be tested by a laboratory to ensure that it is at or below .3% Thc. If it exceeds that threshold, the entire crop has to be destroyed.

It's my wife's and my land, but not our crop (we rent some farmland to a buddy of mine, who's farming it under USDA organic practices.) I'm excited to watch this crop grow! There was a time in my life when I dreamt of living in the middle of a big pot field!
How much $$ per acre do you figure the cash yield to you will be?
Old 06-10-2019, 07:24 PM
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Got a hemp plant 10 miles from me. This plant processes the chaff from the combined hemp. Anybody can grow it in Canada. Kinda a nitch market. Seen some fields when it was grown up. Stuff gets 20 feet tall
Old 06-10-2019, 07:25 PM
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I cash rent the land, so the yield to me isn't huge. But my farmer will hopefully gross about $20-30K per acre. But it's high risk, and high cost. The plants themselves cost $5.00 a piece, and you plant about 1600 plants per acre. Unless you're growing for seed, you then have to remove any male plants before they can pollinate the females. You also need irrigation, which, in this field is done with weep strips (that's my term, not sure what they're really called) buried in each row (basically a hose that leaks along its entire length). Then it has to be harvested and dried (for the 1000 pounds under contract) and, for the rest, cleaned, sorted, and packaged.

It's kind of the wild west, right now, so no one knows for sure what the future holds. North Carolina's State Bureau of Investigation has lobbied hard to prohibit the sale of smokeable hemp, but the legislature postponed any ban until 2021. Smokeable hemp is one of the very profitable markets (in fact, in NC, you can already buy hemp buds and joints in head shops). A joint costs about $9.00, but there's a lot of labor and cost that goes into that one joint (growing, drying, processing, rolling, and packaging, usually in a test tube type package, with printed lab results.)

If you want to pre-order a pound, he's selling it in advance for $420.00 per pound (not sure how he came up with that price. )
Old 06-10-2019, 07:32 PM
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Originally Posted by KJS View Post
You ever consider conservation tillage?
Most of our other land is in conservation tillage (ridge till, no till, etc.). But, peanuts are a big crop here, which, of course, you have to dig up to harvest, so conservation tillage doesn't fully work.

The beauty of organic practices is that there's no chemical fertilizer used. It's all composted manure, or other organic matter. So the soil is very, very healthy (as opposed to some of the farmland under conventional cultivation has little organic matter due both to erosion, and the fact that most of the organic material is removed with the crop. This particular field is very flat and it's not prone to erosion.

Conservation tillage also relies on chemicals for weed control. Since this is in organic production, there are fewer chemical options, so tilling is necessary for weed control.
Old 06-10-2019, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by meritmat View Post
Got a hemp plant 10 miles from me. This plant processes the chaff from the combined hemp. Anybody can grow it in Canada. Kinda a nitch market. Seen some fields when it was grown up. Stuff gets 20 feet tall
We've got a similar plant not too far away (75 miles or so). I think they process it, among other things, for a product that's used to absorb oil (i.e. for cleaning up spills).
Old 06-10-2019, 07:44 PM
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I;m surprised they didn't plant into plastic to cut down on weed growth and reduce the water use.

The person who comes up with either organic sheeting with a 12 month life or a reusable rollout roll in sheet to plant under is set to make a bid quid.

Good luck with it..
Old 06-10-2019, 07:51 PM
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If those were all clones there will be no males to remove . Makes no sense to clone males unless you have breeding program .
Old 06-10-2019, 08:04 PM
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If its more than .3% thc and you need some help destroying it, let me know!
Old 06-10-2019, 08:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Unga Bunga View Post
If those were all clones there will be no males to remove . Makes no sense to clone males unless you have breeding program .
Hemp seed is worth some $, too. Maybe?
Old 06-10-2019, 08:17 PM
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Originally Posted by lps View Post
We've got a similar plant not too far away (75 miles or so). I think they process it, among other things, for a product that's used to absorb oil (i.e. for cleaning up spills).

sorry 10 feet tall.

Ya tons of uses for it.
Old 06-11-2019, 03:27 AM
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I love my pot stocks. They are fun to watch: ACB, CGC, LHSIF, TCNFF, STZ
I believe like others it is an industry, its a once in a lifetime opportunity to get in on the ground floor ( like buying KO 92 years ago).
Your neighbor is on the train. I hope legalization goes country wide. That is when his profits and these stocks will soar!
Old 06-11-2019, 04:03 AM
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Does a field of weed require any special security precautions because of hooligans, etc?
Old 06-11-2019, 04:16 AM
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I have been following the industrial hemp movement a little bit with curiosity. I think it is a good thing. A return to sensible farming and smaller government. There is no reason we shouldn't be growing hemp on an industrial scale for both oil, fiber and food source. It used to be a required crop.

Recently a company applied for a permit to produce CBD oil in nearby Danville, VA. This is an area that was devastated by the textile industry shutdown and down scaling of tobacco operations. Hemp could be a real game changer.

It is sad to drive through the countrysides and see so many once stately plantation homes and farms falling apart and the fields overgrown and unused. This is prime hemp growing territory. The more industrial hemp farming operations we can get started, the lower the THC content will get. It would be nice to see these farms once again growing crops and prospering while producing a crop that could once again revive the textile industry.

The fickle part I see with cannabis stocks and CBD oil investment, is the fact that the lucrative business end of the deal right now is based primarily on the novelty growing hemp, and the lack of supply. Supply control is really the only thing keeping the prices jacked up and generating the massive profits.
Old 06-11-2019, 04:24 AM
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Yes, these are "clones" and hopefully from all females. The clones come from another local grower that is growing hemp in greenhouses, for seed. So they have both male and females. I'm not sure how careful they are in sexing their plants.

Hemp seed is definitely worth money. Hemp seed that will produce plants that meet the .3% or less THC threshold sell for a dollar a piece, and you have to buy them in lots of 5000. But the better guarantee for "legal" hemp is using clones (rooted cuttings).

Using plastic on the field is very effective, but produces a ton of waste. There are farmers in our area who grow produce using plastic, and many have huge piles of trash plastic piled in the woods. It's a mess. I wouldn't allow it on my land. The strip irrigation uses much less plastic, and I suspect the stripping is reusable.

Organic/biodegradable sheeting would be the bomb! Of course, mulch serves the same purpose. But, to stay within the USDA organic guidilines, even the mulch has to be certified organic. We have a cotton gin close by, and the cotton trash is excellent mulch, but it's not certified organic (it comes from conventionally grown cotton). It's also filled with weed seeds, so it needs to be composted for a couple of years to sterilize it.

I'm excited for my buddy to be on the forefront of the hemp industry. He's also set up a seed cleaner, not just for hemp seed, but for corn, soybeans, etc. But it works well for hemp seed. I'm hoping he can make some money on that, too.

GWPH has been my marijuana stock of choice. I've bought it and sold it probably ten times, and have made money every time.
Old 06-11-2019, 04:27 AM
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Originally Posted by lps View Post


Cripes that's not a hemp field.......where the hell is the other 92% of the crop? Up here they plant hemp like corn.
Old 06-11-2019, 04:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Chimo1 View Post
I;m surprised they didn't plant into plastic to cut down on weed growth and reduce the water use.

The person who comes up with either organic sheeting with a 12 month life or a reusable rollout roll in sheet to plant under is set to make a bid quid.

Good luck with it..
Biodegradable film is out there. Meeting with some farmers on it today. Made from corn and can get 2 plantings on it. Plow it into field after last crop is harvested and it provides nutrients back into soil. First usages were in hemp fields due to high cost. Double what normal film costs, but no labor to remove and no disposal cost, normally ends up being a wash or slight reduction in cost.
Old 06-11-2019, 04:35 AM
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So is the cost of the seeds or clones based off of government control measures? Can the farmer produce his own seed to use for next years crop or is that strictly prohibited?
Is your buddy licensed per plant or by the land size?
What is to stop your buddy from producing some plants for seed to negate the high seed/ clone cost?


Hemp bud has no smokeable benefits.
I've read a fair bit about the hemp plant, it truly is an amazing plant with endless possibilities of use, cripes even the roots can be manufactured into consumer based products.

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