Notices
Like Tree51Likes

Had to do CPR Saturday

Old 06-10-2019, 06:07 PM
  #41  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: fl
Posts: 102
Default

Originally Posted by Brezinup View Post
I
He also stated that the compressions are to be strong enough that they may even break bones.
That's true and newbies are always grossed out when they crack ribs or pop cartilage. The issue now is when a code hits the ER bulked up EMS guys are pushing so hard they are breaking blood vessels in the lungs which can make a mess.
yakmatt is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 06:52 PM
  #42  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 568
Default

Originally Posted by slickster View Post
no....saying you could get sued for doing CPR on someone without being trained is dumb....
He!! you can get sued for shooting the bad guys
99yam40 is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 07:25 PM
  #43  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Portsmouth,Va
Posts: 959
Default

Originally Posted by bone-a-fide View Post


Thatís correct. My understanding is a couple main reasons. First the general public even if trained had a hard time getting the compressions and breaths right. Generally people were not getting fast enough compressions. Second, the compressions themself cause air to flow in an out of the lungs enough to circulate oxygen sufficient enough to get oxygen into the blood.

Correct, CPR is about good depth, compressions, and rhythm. most folks when doing compressions dont realize that full chest recoil and atleast 1.5 to 2 inches depth is optimal. Shallow compressions dont allow the heart chambers to fill enough blood and the same goes for going to fast.
Finfever21 is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 08:10 PM
  #44  
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Location: Stuart Fl
Posts: 298
Default

Thanks for all the responses , I'm doing a lot better with it , but I will get some training .
I was doing it right , I think , I could feel his ribs crunching , but when the Paramedic hooked him up he was flatline .
I really think he was already gone when I got there , but I had to try .
Not really the kind of person who talks to strangers about my troubles , but I do have a couple friends I lean on , when I feel the need .
Thanks again , you all helped put it in perspective .
Smitty 45 is online now  
Old 06-10-2019, 08:13 PM
  #45  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 1,054
Default

Hum/sing Bee Gee's "Staying' Alive" when doing CPR, the beat is pretty much spot on to the recommended rhythm of the compressions.
flcatcher1 is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 08:26 PM
  #46  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Gulf Coast, MS
Posts: 1,302
Default

Originally Posted by Smitty 45 View Post
And the guy didn't make it .
My wife and I were pulling out of our storage with the boat , ready to fish .
Came across a guy standing over someone on the ground , we stopped and the guy said he watched the man fall out , said he was jogging , then just fell .
Probably three to five minutes before we got there .
I checked him out , color was bad and his eyes were cloudy , I started chest compression's and his color got better , but he was not breathing , just a deep gasp every thirty seconds .
Paramedics took him in , but he passed .
I can't believe how depressed I got , and wonder if there was anything else I could've done .
I've never been trained in CPR , but I had to try to do something .
You did good.

Im wore out. Donít feel bad. Win some, lose some. Serial...

.
Sea Daddy is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 08:47 PM
  #47  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: fl
Posts: 102
Default

Originally Posted by flcatcher1 View Post
Hum/sing Bee Gee's "Staying' Alive" when doing CPR, the beat is pretty much spot on to the recommended rhythm of the compressions.
I was told to use "Another One Bites the Dust.".... but quietly.
yakmatt is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 09:05 PM
  #48  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Gulf Coast, MS
Posts: 1,302
Default

Originally Posted by yakmatt View Post
I was told to use "Another One Bites the Dust.".... but quietly.
2/100?

Just 100?

100/2?

60-100?——> 2?

its relevant Yak....which one, cpr 1 on 1 pod....I know the answer...



.




Last edited by Sea Daddy; 06-10-2019 at 09:11 PM.
Sea Daddy is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 10:07 PM
  #49  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 411
Default

Originally Posted by ndb8fxe View Post
One way to look at it(as a CPR instructor explained) is that CPR is a 0 risk event. If a person requires CPR, you can not hurt them worse, either their heart or breathing has stopped already, meaning they are already dead. CPR gives them a chance to come back, however like others mentioned it a low percentage.
My understanding is CPR pumps blood to the lungs (gets oxygen) and to the brain to keep the body alive until other interventions can be used to get the heart going again (AED, drugs, etc). It's not like Baywatch where 2 minutes of CPR and the person coughs and wakes up. It takes a shock or drug to get the heart going again, the CPR just keeps the body/brain alive long enough for the experts to work their magic. But I just learned that from internetforums LOL
johnny.dollar is offline  
Old 06-10-2019, 10:41 PM
  #50  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Gulf Coast, MS
Posts: 1,302
Default

Originally Posted by johnny.dollar View Post
My understanding is CPR pumps blood to the lungs (gets oxygen) and to the brain to keep the body alive until other interventions can be used to get the heart going again (AED, drugs, etc). It's not like Baywatch where 2 minutes of CPR and the person coughs and wakes up. It takes a shock or drug to get the heart going again, the CPR just keeps the body/brain alive long enough for the experts to work their magic. But I just learned that from internetforums LOL
AED has nothing to do with cardiac output unless successfully converted to a normal rhythm..it only may convert a potential fatal cardiac rhythm to be converted to a non fatal rhythm.

CPR may help improve cardiac output to rest of the body including the brain.

.
Sea Daddy is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 02:01 AM
  #51  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Raleigh & Surf City, NC
Posts: 12,848
Default

Reading all these non survival accounts given here makes me realize even more how lucky my bro in law was. He had turned 50 three months earlier. I would guess he's 6', 6'1", or 6'2" and overweight. They did break 3 ribs during the cpr. He has had 2 seizures since the event, last one was months ago and now he's on preventative meds and is free to drive. He'll be on the anti seiz meds at least 5 yrs.

Pretty much a full recovery. Only things are being on those meds and his voice is different from vocal cord scar tissue from having the tube down his throat.

The survival rates are low, don't be discouraged, if you see someone that needs help, jump in and don't be timid. CPR done correctly is a violent thing. You never know which one is going to survive because of you.

Last edited by baypro21; 06-11-2019 at 02:07 AM.
baypro21 is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 03:27 AM
  #52  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Downingtown, PA
Posts: 1,109
Default

Originally Posted by Finfever21 View Post
That's correct Rapi, take a few seconds to determine if they are breathing, if not go straight to compressions. Getting the blood flowing to the heart is key to early survival. No more then 120 a minute and at minimum 100.
Been years since I trained. What about a person in respiratory arrest but not cardiac arrest? Isnít there a risk of putting someone into full arrest by doing compressions prematurely?
Polapea is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 05:19 AM
  #53  
RCL
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,044
Default

Originally Posted by Polapea View Post


Been years since I trained. What about a person in respiratory arrest but not cardiac arrest? Isnít there a risk of putting someone into full arrest by doing compressions prematurely?
A person in respiratory arrest is different from a person in cardiac arrest. Doing compressions on a person that has a heart beat but not breathing is not helping at all. Unless its well below sustainable. They will go into cardiac arrest if there in respiratory arrest and there breathing is not restored. However that would be fairly quick. As in a matter of minutes. In theory could you put someone into cardiac arrest by doing compressions is up for debate but I can guarantee that they will go into cardiac arrest if they stop breathing long enough.

With that said, you would need to find out why they aren't breathing. Is there airway occluded,? (Tongue covering the back of the throat or something lodged in the throat) Are they having an anaphylaxis reaction to something and the airway is swelling cutting off the pathway? (ABC or Airway Breathing Circulation. Without the first you wont have the 2nd 2.)

Heres another question. Is it an infant, child or adult? Infants and some smaller children are treated different then an adult, because of there anatomical features. Basically their body is still growing to meet their heads proportionally, and a infant laying on its back can occlude its airway. Simply supporting the infants shoulders with a towel, jacket etc. may open its airway.
RCL is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 05:33 AM
  #54  
RCL
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,044
Default

Originally Posted by johnny.dollar View Post
My understanding is CPR pumps blood to the lungs (gets oxygen) and to the brain to keep the body alive until other interventions can be used to get the heart going again (AED, drugs, etc). It's not like Baywatch where 2 minutes of CPR and the person coughs and wakes up. It takes a shock or drug to get the heart going again, the CPR just keeps the body/brain alive long enough for the experts to work their magic. But I just learned that from internetforums LOL
Theres a little bit more to it then that depending on who you ask. Our medical director told us that basically a person that goes into cardiac arrest still has enough usable oxygen in their system that the 2 quick breaths really don't do much help. The idea is to get that o2 flowing to where it needs to be to save the brain and organs from oxygen starvation and ultimately tissue death of those organs. But yes in theory CPR will at least attempt to keep the body and organs alive long enough for more interventions.
Portable AEDs, will shock 2 rhythm's and 2 rhythm's only. Ventricular Fibrillation and Ventricular Tachycardia. Either the heart is beating too slow or too fast. That's it. The drugs that medics administer, usually Epinephrine, Atropine and a few others based on the region and medical director, basically try to stimulate the heart to start on its own. If not, we do it manually. Once a person gets to an er, depending on a bunch of factors will determine what happens next. Whether they go to a cath lab for treatment, there observed or they call it. Ive seen people that go thru 5 and 6 rounds of drugs and CPR and not wake up, and others that before the first drug is pushed there starting to fight us. Like I said before, it all depends on the reason they dropped to begin with.

Finfever21 likes this.
RCL is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 05:54 AM
  #55  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 816
Default

Smitty. Hang in there. You had the guts to step into the fray and try, no matter what the result. If I were his family, I would be thankful to you for giving him a chance - even though it didnt work out. You should be proud that you cared enough to give it a shot.
CME likes this.
mz06907 is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 07:43 AM
  #56  
Admirals Club Admiral's Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 411
Default

Originally Posted by RCL View Post
Theres a little bit more to it then that depending on who you ask. ......
Great info, thanks.
johnny.dollar is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 08:04 AM
  #57  
RCL
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,044
Default

Originally Posted by johnny.dollar View Post
Great info, thanks.
No problem.
RCL is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 09:31 AM
  #58  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 259
Default

God Bless you for trying Smitty45. Sounds like you did everything you could and you did great. I know it has been said before but the teacher in my CPR class said if you don't try then they already aren't going to make it. So you are awesome for trying.
Hope you feel better and you are a hero. Hugs
ILoveMermaids is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 11:06 AM
  #59  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Downingtown, PA
Posts: 1,109
Default

Q
Originally Posted by RCL View Post
A person in respiratory arrest is different from a person in cardiac arrest. Doing compressions on a person that has a heart beat but not breathing is not helping at all.
I’m aware that cardiac and respiratory arrest are different which is why I asked the question. I was responding to Finfever21 stating the protocol is no breathing = start compressions. That’s different then the way I was trained as we didn’t start compressions unless there was no pulse.

How I learned:
No breathing, pulse present- rescue breathing
No pulse, no breathing- Full CPR

Originally Posted by Finfever21 View Post
We don't do mouth to mouth anymore, AHA have found that compressions from the start saves a lot more lives then 2 breaths interrupted. It used to be ABC (airway, breathing and circulation now its CAB (circulation, airway, breathing)Getting the blood flowing to the heart with compressions is key to early stage survival.
Samb likes this.

Last edited by Polapea; 06-11-2019 at 11:14 AM.
Polapea is offline  
Old 06-11-2019, 01:38 PM
  #60  
Senior MemberCaptains Club Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: New Orleans, LA
Posts: 102
Default

I just finished the Cintos CPR/AED training at work 2 weeks ago.
We were taught 30 compressions 2 breaths unless the AED was being used.
Once the AED delivers it's shock it well tell you to continue CPR if the heart is not beating correctly, until it's time for the next shock.
gwilliams is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread