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Career Change

Old 05-30-2019, 03:57 AM
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Long time reader. Infrequent poster here. Lots of good advice on this forum so I figured why not solicit some for myself.

Been in IT 25+ years on the software side. Been an independent contractor for 20 of those years and have become burnt out from the corporate life.

Not afraid of a days work. Being in one thing for so long creates a myopic view when trying to determine next move.

Any THT"s been in IT for that long and made a transition to something new?

Open to any suggestions. Have at it.
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Old 05-30-2019, 04:12 AM
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I hear you about the burn out. Question is how much money can you make at the new career, will it match your old career, and can you take a pay cut?
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:24 AM
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I'm in the same boat as you. Been managing data centers for 20 years. Time to move on.. really have no idea what to do. Like Clamdigger said.. will be hard to find something that pays the same.
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:26 AM
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How much do you know about DevOps and Storage systems?
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:29 AM
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The real questions would be what do you want to do, do you have the skill set to do it and once you change do you think you'll feel any different. I'm 100% for changing, life is too short to be unhappy at work but make sure the change will fix your problem.
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:57 AM
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Stay in your lane but get out of the corporate jungle.Your worth is your experience in your area of expertise.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:02 AM
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I see this a lot from IT guys. My advice would be to keep using the skill that you have but get out of IT Operations, its a pressure cooker. Go work for a consulting organization or a company where IT is their core competency. There is no way I would work in operations if I could avoid it.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:09 AM
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Raise your rate
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:11 AM
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Been in IT since 1984 and I follow these rules to fight burnout.
Do not sit in front of a tube when you get off work.
Leave work at work.
Try to do everything on your time off that is non- IT related, ie: Fish, Hunt, Grandkids, Camp, etc.....
It is hard to beat the money, and after 25 years, it will be hard to go to something new. You don't like your job, who does ? But I like getting paid and the benefits it brings......
Never forget your blessings !
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:12 AM
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:33 AM
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I've been dealing with this for a while as well. Plan and be dilligent in what makes you happy. Pull the trigger when you're ready.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:42 AM
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Just retired a few months ago from a 33 year career in IT. I was totally burned out by the beauracracy and red tape that had become the majority of my job. I had put a lot into my 401k during my working years, have no debt, and my Wife (who will be retiring in 3 yrs) will have a pension and 100% paid for medical benefits. I took advantage of the IRS 72t rule which allows you to withdraw from your 401k prior to age 59 1/2, without paying the penalty. I make a little side money as a local blues guitarist which keeps my wallet full, spending cash wise. I may take on something else at some point. Not sure. Perhaps a short-term (6 to 12 month) consulting gig, or go work at Home Depot. Just to keep me busy. But for right now, I'm just trying to get caught up on the home improvement projects the Wife and I have been wanting to do.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:50 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
The real questions would be what do you want to do, do you have the skill set to do it and once you change do you think you'll feel any different. I'm 100% for changing, life is too short to be unhappy at work but make sure the change will fix your problem.
The average guy avoids this question because the true answer isn't that complex.
The average guy would be totally happy to pursue nothing and has no particular passion for anything. He has obligations, and works solely to meet those obligations.
Then, he creates golden handcuffs that lead to more obligations etc.
I guy who knows what he wants to do, and takes steps to do it, is not the norm.
The guy with a passion already knows it, and if he isn't pursuing it yet, he is figuring out a way to pursue it.
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Last edited by chrispnet; 05-30-2019 at 07:04 AM.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:03 AM
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I needed a career change and decided to try man whoring.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:33 AM
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Originally Posted by JCC123 View Post
I needed a career change and decided to try man whoring.
I'm sure you will be pleased to know that the WHO has declared "burn out" a medical syndrome.
The cure is in your hands!
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:41 AM
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Can you do part time? I was in the same boat, working for a financial services outfit for many years where the work was somewhat seasonal. Reduced my overall hours for the year with a corresponding halving of my salary. Now I work basically full time in the busy part of the year and very little the rest of the year. I now focus only on the kind of projects that I do best, and that I get job satisfaction from. A win for both me and my company, as they only pay me for when I am needed and I can skip most of the BS corporate administration and politics with plenty of free time in the long summer and early fall season.
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:24 AM
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Operations is a 7 x 24 job most of the time. I moved to technical sales support using my technical background over 20 years ago and never looked back. Moved to operational sales support a few years back. Got tired of keeping up with technology.

I know some folks think "sales" is a 4 letter word. Sales support has it's issues/pressure but nothing near my old Operations support role.

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Old 05-30-2019, 08:50 AM
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I just flew with a guy who was in IT. Got his ratings and CFI'd part time while he was still doing IT stuff. Flew RJ's for a while full time and did IT consulting part time for extra $. Full time 737 FO now. I don't know a thing about IT or the specifics of how he transitioned from IT to flying, but he seemed happy with his move.
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Old 05-30-2019, 09:15 AM
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Originally Posted by seadubya View Post
I've been dealing with this for a while as well. Have worked in IT since 96, operations/systems admin. I'm pulling the trigger next week and putting in my 2 weeks nocitce. I placed enough aside to reasonably get by on for at least 6 - 8 months. I plan on a 2 week vacation and then getting some things done around the house a little bit before I start applying or pivoting in another direction. Plan and be dilligent in what makes you happy. Good luck.
Sorry for my opinion here, but your nuts. Never leave a job unless you have a replacement lined up or you are returning.

1. You never know how long it is going to take to find the RIGHT job.
2. It’s easier to get a job when you have one.
3. You have much more negotiating power with a current paycheck.
4. You need a loan in the future they look at months unemployed and doesn’t look good.
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Old 05-30-2019, 09:21 AM
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burn out is experienced in all fields of work......................
Red tape, corporate abhorrence and capriciousness has infiltrated every W2 earners job in America.

If I had the stones to make a change (and I don't) I would start my own company.
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