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Natural gas in Florida?

Old 05-29-2019, 06:41 PM
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Default Natural gas in Florida?

I was talking with someone in Florida who was selling a NG stove in favor of an electric stove, it struck me as odd so I asked why?

He went on to tell me that during a recent hurricane NG had been shut off for a week and they couldn't cook.

Is this factual and if so how often do they cut NG service?
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Old 05-29-2019, 06:47 PM
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The only time natural gas service is interrupted is if there is a major break in a transmission line. Most gas utilities are fed from multiple directions. My gas utility has never had an outage based on weather.
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Old 05-29-2019, 06:50 PM
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When Irma Hit, several trees fell, roots and all, taking out the gas lines. I am not surprised.
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:04 PM
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Propane ...problem goes away
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by TUNEE View Post
Propane ...problem goes away
Until the tank is dry. My generator ate a 125 gallon tank in less than a week and propane deliveries were a couple weeks out ... at over $4 a gallon..
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:20 PM
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When I've been without electrical for weeks following canes, natty gas was still flowing. A hot shower any day of the week after Fla weather during Hurricane season is awesome!
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Old 05-29-2019, 07:25 PM
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Went thru Michael and the only thing that did work was natural gas.
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Old 05-30-2019, 04:36 AM
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1000 gallon propane tank for cooking, water heating and drying.

25kw with 525 gallons diesel for everything else.

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Old 05-30-2019, 05:09 AM
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Originally Posted by fijon View Post
When I've been without electrical for weeks following canes, natty gas was still flowing. A hot shower any day of the week after Fla weather during Hurricane season is awesome!
You are lucky to have natural gas in Florida.
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:18 AM
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Originally Posted by YFMF View Post
I was talking with someone in Florida who was selling a NG stove in favor of an electric stove, it struck me as odd so I asked why?

He went on to tell me that during a recent hurricane NG had been shut off for a week and they couldn't cook.

Is this factual and if so how often do they cut NG service?
I'd buy a cheap $20 portable single electric burner and keep in for this particular scenario. Keep the gas...
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by gfretwell View Post
Until the tank is dry. My generator ate a 125 gallon tank in less than a week and propane deliveries were a couple weeks out ... at over $4 a gallon..
Those are the 2 reasons I went with a 17.5 KW gas generator. We have NG but it can be cut off. If you run out of propane after a hurricane it's hard to get it refilled. With gas I can pump it out of the boats on the lifts. But I've only had to use it once after Irma.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:26 AM
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Natural gas outages are a lot less common than other utilities, especially in Florida, where most of it is high pressure. I'd opt for NG appliances over electric any day.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:29 AM
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It’s high pressure in FL. Don’t know if I believe it, but anything is possible.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:29 AM
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Originally Posted by mikefloyd View Post
Those are the 2 reasons I went with a 17.5 KW gas generator. We have NG but it can be cut off. If you run out of propane after a hurricane it's hard to get it refilled. With gas I can pump it out of the boats on the lifts. But I've only had to use it once after Irma.
The hurricanes in 2006 or so..I used gasoline from my boat. FEMA came to town, and was reimbursing people for generator fuel. Typical gubment, they had to categorize it as "heating oil". Then they said I needed a receipt for fuel dated at the time of the hurricane. I asked them "how am I supposed to pump gasoline when the electricity is out??" Dumasses.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:30 AM
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During Katrina, the natural gas here (Louisiana) never stopped flowing. The problem was, so many people, including large businesses were running natural gas generators that the system could not deliver enough pressure / volume to keep it all running. Our nat gas cook top, dryer and water heaters continued to work but they are relatively low consumption. The folks who were having problems were the ones trying to run nat gas generators.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:41 AM
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No natgas in my area. So propane for cooking, diesel for hurricane gennie. I'm approaching three years on the stove 57gal (??) propane tank fill. The gennie burns about 50gal a week running the whole house. No fan of running gasoline, natgas, or propane for gennies, they just burn too much fuel.

But cooking with natgas or propane is awesome!! No way will I go back to an electric stove.
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:04 AM
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Anecdotally I've heard they're pretty good about keeping the gas on, and amusingly I had one conversation with the gas co where the customer service rep misunderstood me and was adamant that they had very high incident response times time since "people could freeze to death." I got a good laugh out of that here in S Florida.

I resisted until the gas co just replaced all of the main lines in my neighborhood this past year. I figured that was a good enough excuse to hook up, and went with a NG generator. For true self-sufficiency, absolutely I'd rather have a large buried propane tank but that's not practical for me.

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Old 05-30-2019, 01:01 PM
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Originally Posted by YFMF View Post
I was talking with someone in Florida who was selling a NG stove in favor of an electric stove, it struck me as odd so I asked why?

He went on to tell me that during a recent hurricane NG had been shut off for a week and they couldn't cook.

Is this factual and if so how often do they cut NG service?
Yes it has happened to us, family and friends several times (natural gas was invulnerability turned off during a hurricane). The explanation was - "it's up to their discretion based on the proximity of your house to the water table in the time of a declared emergency". If your house or any part of the servicing line falls under the orders of a mandatory evacuation zone they will shut it off in preparation of the rising water tables which can rupture the lines. We were equally shocked/surprised at the time. Another family member had a Generac natural gas generator and it was worthless. Propane or gas generator is the only guarantee.
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:37 PM
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Originally Posted by Tim_fl View Post
Yes it has happened to us, family and friends several times (natural gas was invulnerability turned off during a hurricane). The explanation was - "it's up to their discretion based on the proximity of your house to the water table in the time of a declared emergency". If your house or any part of the servicing line falls under the orders of a mandatory evacuation zone they will shut it off in preparation of the rising water tables which can rupture the lines. We were equally shocked/surprised at the time. Another family member had a Generac natural gas generator and it was worthless. Propane or gas generator is the only guarantee.
how does rising water cause the line to burst? i think it is more of a question of will damage from the storm compromise the lines, if possible, it gets shut down, if not it stays on!
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:48 PM
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Originally Posted by YFMF View Post
I was talking with someone in Florida who was selling a NG stove in favor of an electric stove, it struck me as odd so I asked why?

He went on to tell me that during a recent hurricane NG had been shut off for a week and they couldn't cook.

Is this factual and if so how often do they cut NG service?
It's probably factual in the sense your friend was not lying to you, but he is trying to extrapolate from a single incident. It is just as likely next time NG stays available, and electricity goes out for a week.

Given the cost differences of the two "fuels", I would not replace an NG appliance with an electric one. It would make sense to have a backup plan, a propane grill and a single-burner induction cooktop, or something similar, would cover most contingencies.
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