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Severe weather plan

Old 05-30-2019, 05:46 AM
  #21  
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Since we have hurricanes and not often tornadoes we have about 4 days to make out minds up. If it looks like a cat 2 or less we button up and stay. If more than that we drive out of the path. We did get suckered from Irma. We drove to the west coast and then had to run back home as the path changed quick.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:41 AM
  #22  
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Not a lot of basements in much of the Gulf Coast area. Lacking a basement, best option is a small interior room, no windows. A bathroom is usually the strongest, because it is fairly small (not a large span), and has piping in the wall. Get in a bathtub if possible. Wind does not hurt you - debris blown by the wind does. My son and his family survived the tornado in Tuscaloosa (Cedar Crest) by following the advice. In an interior room, pulled a mattress over them - the mattress had hundreds of glass shards in it, but they were unscathed.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:45 AM
  #23  
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Yes, I have a storm readiness kit...... two items.... 6-pack and a lawn chair.

No, I'm not kidding.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:53 AM
  #24  
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I've never figured out why people can see a tornado way off in the distance and their response is to hunker down in a house not strong enough to handle a direct hit. I'd get in my car and just drive the opposite direction. I men you have storm chasers that can run all around to get to the storm why not just do the opposite.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:19 AM
  #25  
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Having chased storms professionally, and surveyed the damage from a number of storms, it isn’t always that simple, fishingfun. Visibility is often limited, the damn things happen a night a lot in the South, storm tracks can be erratic (driving into the problem, rather than away from it), and when one is barreling at you at 60 mph, it takes longer to get to a vehicle and drive away than you might think. Dr. Fujita suggested in a seminar in Lubbock many years ago that under a work bench in the corner of a basement, with a helmet on, was his preferred option. My first project (even more years ago) flew through waterspouts to gather data, and that was about as much excitement as I want; Pete Sinclair of Colorado State flew (intentionally) a Voodoo through tornadic thunderstorms across the Great Plains, which gave us really good insight into the storm dynamics before Doppler became commonplace. Bottom line is that a secure interior location greatly enhances your chance of survival, and covering with something to stop or slow debris, like a mattress or a helmet, does help.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:29 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by fishingfun View Post
I've never figured out why people can see a tornado way off in the distance and their response is to hunker down in a house not strong enough to handle a direct hit. I'd get in my car and just drive the opposite direction. I men you have storm chasers that can run all around to get to the storm why not just do the opposite.
hah, okay. We had 60+ tornadoes last week. I think 3 of them were visible.....
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:29 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by Bison View Post
Stay indoors preferably in a basement closest to the direction of the storm, open windows, stay away from glass and monitor TV or radio for developments. If you lack a basement go to a neighbor's or internal ground floor room without windows. It is critical to open windows to allow air pressure to readily equalize and thereby reduce the probability of flying glass shards.

Below grade is your friend in a tornado; the deeper the better.

Leaving all the windows closed is the current best practice.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:48 AM
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My house was built in 1775 so it has a good history of not falling down. I'm gonna stay inside it.
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Old 05-30-2019, 07:58 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Basketcase View Post
My house was built in 1775 so it has a good history of not falling down. I'm gonna stay inside it.
That's awesome.... pics of house....... and wife.
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Old 05-30-2019, 01:09 PM
  #30  
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You do not need to open windows - the tornado will handle that task if necessary, and if the tornado just slides by, having the windows down will keep rain out.
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Old 05-30-2019, 03:21 PM
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I have a 12” thick 12’ deep poured foundation with two pieces of 1/2” rebar every foot horizontal and vertically. 1/2 my basement is under my garage which is a 6” slab with rebar supported by a welded steel I beam skeleton. I’m good.
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Old 05-30-2019, 03:41 PM
  #32  
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I've lived at the beach in NC for over 30 years and have been through plenty of cat 3 storms, no big deal. I was visiting a lady friend in Georgia one evening and heard a train run by late at night. I asked her how close the tracks were and she said there weren't any!

Next morning we drove out and at the top of a small hill I could see 5 miles in each direction and it was absolutely wiped clean. I'm talking about cement pads with nothing left of brick churches that were there yesterday. Nothing above ground man made or not was left standing, period. They called it a cat 5 and I believe it! Nothing was left, scraped clean ground.
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Old 05-30-2019, 04:34 PM
  #33  
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:08 PM
  #34  
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At home its the 1/2 bath. At the camper it is a nearby church that has a basement and opens it up to everyone to take shelter.
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Old 05-30-2019, 05:57 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by SouthpawHD View Post


You were under a tornado watch and left your house?

Staying inside a structure, preferably a basement, is the best place to be.
I would normally agree with this (and it is what we did Memorial Day night), but people in a house in the next State/town was in their basement when the first storm went through. They smelled gas and was told not to stay in the basement because of that (maybe LP gas?). Another storm came through next and the tornado went through and the kitchen ended up in their basement where they were going to be initially.

If I had the time, it may be best to drive out of the storm's path and let it do it's thing. Seems not much we can do about some of these outcomes.
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Old 05-30-2019, 06:18 PM
  #36  
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Hurricanes? Yes, we leave town and try and secure valuables left behind as much as possible. Flash tornado warnings? There is a designated room or closet, depending on the hose with no external walls as close to the middle of the house as possible. Always stocked with water and working flashlights.
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Old 05-30-2019, 08:12 PM
  #37  
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CBS house with impact windows. Week worth of food. Plenty of ammo
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Old 05-31-2019, 04:26 AM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Kenny Powers View Post
That's awesome.... pics of house....... and wife.
No wife pics, sorry, but here is my severe weather plan. I figure this house has made it through every storm in the last 240 years so it might go a few more.



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Old 05-31-2019, 06:38 AM
  #39  
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Originally Posted by Basketcase View Post
No wife pics, sorry, but here is my severe weather plan. I figure this house has made it through every storm in the last 240 years so it might go a few more.

That's very cool. Foreign concept to me. Your house was 130 years old before my state was a state. If those walls could talk.
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Old 05-31-2019, 06:55 AM
  #40  
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Where in NE?
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