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Tubeless mtn bike tires, need to replace tires can I go back to tubes?

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Tubeless mtn bike tires, need to replace tires can I go back to tubes?

Old 05-20-2019, 04:03 AM
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Default Tubeless mtn bike tires, need to replace tires can I go back to tubes?

My downhill bike has tubeless tires. I bought it used, like I buy all my bikes. It's a huge Rocky Mountain, weighs as much as a small tractor.

Front tire is getting some dry rot in sidewall and I'm thinking of going back to tubes for simplicity of change outs. Is this doable or will my rim be all gunked up on the inside? I'll change both if I do, though back tires in good shape.

I know the SOP on tubeless is to carry a spare tube if you can't patch the tire, but I don't know a Whole lot abuot tubeless tires in general. Carry patch kit pump and tubes for all my bikes.

I ride during the work day for exercise, where a two hour hike out will eff my day up pretty fierce. What should I do here guys? I guess what I'm asking is tubeless the new normal? Am I going back to old tech? Most of our trail hazards are sharp rocks and roots, not much in terms of spiky thorns.

Last edited by Double tyme; 05-20-2019 at 04:51 AM.
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Old 05-20-2019, 04:46 AM
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Tubeless have been around for a long time and have their merits, but aren't the only game in town as traditional tubed tires are holding their own and have merits as well. Unless you got some really wide, non traditional sized rims, you can go to tubed tires, but make sure you put tire tape on the inside of the rim, where the spokes attach. On tubed rims, they take the time to file or grind down that area as a sharp corner or piece can/will puncture a tube, but they don't worry about it with tubeless as there will be no tube or tire contacting the area.
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Old 05-20-2019, 06:38 AM
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Lots of people run tubes in tubess for ease of fixing on the trail, especially the old school guys used to doing their own flats, myself included. Most dont but it is recomended to replace the air tight rim strip with a conventional one to alow air to release between tire and tube when installing tube. Also a little tip since tires fit much tighter on tubeless rims. Most tubeless rims have a cavity in the center or rim for the bead to go down into for tire install. Keep working the bead into that area while pullin the last section of bead over the rim. If the bead is on the outer edges the tire will not go on. Sometimes its offset to one side of the rim. Thats because disc should always be up when instaling tires so they dont get bent and you are working the tire down, if all this makes sense.

Last edited by bikem; 05-20-2019 at 06:47 AM.
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Old 05-20-2019, 06:54 AM
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Same goes for removing tire that center cavity is your friend getting enough slack to get tire started off the rim.
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Old 05-20-2019, 07:05 AM
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I would stick with the tubeless. Just carry a tube and co2 inflater if you are worried about a flat and walking out. I think flats are less likely with tubeless since you don't need to worry about pinch flats.
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Old 05-20-2019, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by bikem View Post
Lots of people run tubes in tubess for ease of fixing on the trail, especially the old school guys used to doing their own flats, myself included. Most dont but it is recomended to replace the air tight rim strip with a conventional one to alow air to release between tire and tube when installing tube. Also a little tip since tires fit much tighter on tubeless rims. Most tubeless rims have a cavity in the center or rim for the bead to go down into for tire install. Keep working the bead into that area while pullin the last section of bead over the rim. If the bead is on the outer edges the tire will not go on. Sometimes its offset to one side of the rim. Thats because disc should always be up when instaling tires so they dont get bent and you are working the tire down, if all this makes sense.
thanks man, was hoping you'd chime in.
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