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North Carolina Re-location Suggestions

Old 01-04-2019, 09:27 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post

North Carolina looks to be slightly less "southern", so it might be a good spot to start looking more in depth. Then I go on THT (a good source for just about anything under the sun) and start lurking on the Carolinas sub forum. After a bit of time reading, I finally post a question asking about a couple of spots in coastal NC.

To the casual observer, it may look like some northern bozo just blindly decided one day he's going to move to rural eastern NC, but in reality, there was a bit more analysis
What makes an area less "Southern"? Is it the yankee transplants? Is it the climate? Eastern NC is not much different than SC, GA, AL or rural FL. You can't judge eastern NC based off visiting RDU, Wilmington or the OBX areas in the summer. That is not eastern NC.
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Old 01-04-2019, 10:48 AM
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Originally Posted by goheelzfan View Post
What makes an area less "Southern"? Is it the yankee transplants? Is it the climate? Eastern NC is not much different than SC, GA, AL or rural FL. You can't judge eastern NC based off visiting RDU, Wilmington or the OBX areas in the summer. That is not eastern NC.
So which Counties within Eastern NC coastal areas should he visit in which you would consider "Southern"? What makes it not less "Southern"?

Here is the problem, if you live by the ocean regardless of what state you live in within the Eastern US you will have to deal with transplants, in state and out of state visitors, it is not unique to NC as much as the locals would think it is. Just ask the locals in Myrtle Beach, Jersey Shore, Delaware Shore, Cape Cod, etc, etc. they will all have the same complaints, but most will gladly accept the jobs and money these folks bring into their communities.

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Old 01-04-2019, 12:16 PM
  #23  
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Edenton is nice, right on the Chowan River and Albemarle Sound. Home of Albemarle and Regulator boats. I loved NC when I lived there, and would probably go back some day. Just don't do like every other Yankee and vote for the same kind of lousy politicians that you left in the North.
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Old 01-04-2019, 12:41 PM
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Originally Posted by Vitamin_Sea View Post
Edenton is nice, right on the Chowan River and Albemarle Sound. Home of Albemarle and Regulator boats. I loved NC when I lived there, and would probably go back some day. Just don't do like every other Yankee and vote for the same kind of lousy politicians that you left in the North.
I promise I won't. Despite living in Massachusetts, I've never voted Democrat, I have a Class A LTC (along with a C&R license), and wife is a 20 year Army veteran. Trust me, we're outnumbered up here!
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Old 01-04-2019, 12:48 PM
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Originally Posted by goheelzfan View Post
What makes an area less "Southern"? Is it the yankee transplants? Is it the climate? Eastern NC is not much different than SC, GA, AL or rural FL. You can't judge eastern NC based off visiting RDU, Wilmington or the OBX areas in the summer. That is not eastern NC.
I'd say size, political leanings, economic diversity, "college town" atmospheres, % of yankee transplants, and a few other factors. Not that I would move to Asheville, but I can't imagine SC having a place like Asheville. It reminds me of Austin vs the rest of Texas.

There's nothing wrong with a place being labelled as Southern - how many folks leave the Carolinas to retire up North?
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Old 01-04-2019, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
Not quite as crazy as you'd think. How should people pick a spot to move? The truth is, I haven't seen a really efficient way of picking a place. Lots of people live where they live because they grew up there, and are a little scared to move anywhere else. Others will move because of a job or a girlfriend/boyfriend. None of these result in an overly scientific process for possible

I met my wife through work - I worked just outside of Boston and she worked near Buffalo, NY, but the same company. We met, got serious, and were doing the long distance thing. She was looking for a job change and applied for one at a place near her home. We had talked about moving but weren't quite there yet. The position wasn't a fit, but they liked her and told her about an opening they had in their headquarters in Indiana. We talked, and I started looking at open positions in Indiana at that company. We both got offers, and we moved to Indiana, stayed there for 2 years, got married, and then moved back to the Boston area, as jobs in our fields were far more prevalent in Boston than Buffalo, and it made sense to be near at least one family. Neither move had an overly scientific thought process. We moved to Indiana because there happened to be a job opening there from a company she had applied to because she didn't like her current boss. It's not like we compiled a list of possible states and factored in a bunch of criteria and came up with Indiana! I would argue that a lot of people's moves are based on something other than a well thought out scientific evaluation of all possible locations.

Fast forward to today. Late forties, plan to retire in nine years, so we're beginning the search for a retirement home now. I may or may not find what I'm looking for, so most characteristics aren't showstoppers - if something hits most of what we're looking for we'll consider it. You cannot visit every possible place, so you need to start narrowing things down. We want coastal, which eliminates any inside states without salt water. We have no interest in living on the left coast, and have spent time in Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, and Florida, and no places there interest us, although Galveston and Austin did warrant a second look. That leaves me with the East coast, still too big to visit every possible state, so we further refined it. I'm sick of cold,harsh winters, so we crossed off anything north of the DC area. Even then, DC still has winter, just not as bad. They also have some unholy traffic down there which I've experienced first hand. Not wanting Florida, the concept of halfbacks was interesting - people who moved down to Florida, then decided to move halfway back. So that let us focus more on North Carolina, South Carolina, and possibly Georgia. On paper, North Carolina looks to be slightly less "southern", so it might be a good spot to start looking more in depth. Then I go on THT (a good source for just about anything under the sun) and start lurking on the Carolinas sub forum. After a bit of time reading, I finally post a question asking about a couple of spots in coastal NC.

To the casual observer, it may look like some northern bozo just blindly decided one day he's going to move to rural eastern NC, but in reality, there was a bit more analysis

Now paper only gets you so far. Once I have a few spots lined up, I'll fly down for a few days and hang out to get a feel for the area. If all goes well, and any of the lots that looked good on paper also look ok in person, we'll try renting a place for a week and see how that goes. If it still looks ok, then we'll plunk some money down on a lot of land, with plans to build when the retirement date gets closer. We'd prefer land over a pre-existing house as being an absentee landlord over a long distance is something I do not wish to do again. If we change our minds, we sell the land. If anything turns us off from the area, we'll adjust and start looking in another area, even if it's in another state. Same thing - narrow choices down on paper, but then go see them in person. A message board is a great place to start. A real estate person will give his or her opinion, but a board like this lets us see views from a hundred responders rather than one. It's not like I'm going to buy property sight unseen.

So while it may look like blindly picking a spot to move, it may have actually been a better thought-out process then moving because a specific job opening was there.
This is how the smart ones do it.

The dumb ones just purchase where they went on vacation over the years. Myrtle Beach and Orlando are huge relocation areas for folks from the North. Only when they live there do they realize why there are so few locals.
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Old 01-04-2019, 02:14 PM
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I've lived in Wilmington for 17 years. Did most of my boating in SE CT and Block Island Sound to Long Island Sound. Lived in CT 20 plus years and Charleston RI 3 years. Best boating is in New England for sure.

I considered medical and university cities important as well. Wilmington is a service economy with many restaurants. You will enjoy the beautiful beaches, clean water and longer boating season. Fishing opportunities are greater, inshore, nearshore and offshore. Couldn't afford waterfront in the Ocean State, but not a problem here. You just don't have as many cruising destinations, unless you like the beach.

Good luck! Sounds like you have a good plan.
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Old 01-04-2019, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by thefuzz View Post
This is how the smart ones do it.

The dumb ones just purchase where they went on vacation over the years. Myrtle Beach and Orlando are huge relocation areas for folks from the North. Only when they live there do they realize why there are so few locals.
Thanks. I try not to do that, because most vacation places we've visited started out as "hey let's go to xxx!" with little thought put into it.
I'm sure my methods aren't perfect, and I realize no one place will check all of the boxes. Texas won't tax a military pension, but Virginia will. But then Texas real estate taxes are higher. North Carolina has some preferential treatment for military retirement pay, but you needed 5 years vested by 1989 so we missed that window. Since we're not moving until our daughter finishes college, we don't have to initially worry about moving to the highest rated school system, and although school systems affect resale, that's more of a factor in your first home than your last one. So many variables!

When we go on vacation, especially to the same place, we tend to fall into a pattern - always go to the same convenience store, always eat at the same restaurants, and by the end of the vacation we've fallen into a rigid regimen, which makes it difficult to judge "vacation living" vs "normal living" if that makes any sense.
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Old 01-04-2019, 04:50 PM
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I disagree with the assertions that eastern NC doesn't have great cruising, and I speak this as someone who absolutely loves LIS and NE. When we were done cruising up and down the eastern seaboard full time we decided to dock in Morehead because of the excellent cruising and anchorage destinations within two days of slow-bell speeds. Not just all the fun waterside towns but beautiful undeveloped anchorages like Cape Lookout, South River, Waccamaw River complex and tributaries of the sounds. We are familiar with the Westerly area as we usually anchored off Napatree Beach or moored in Watch Hill coming and going.

I replied more completely to the OP on another forum where he posted the same question. We live in eastern NC purely for outstanding boating and beach related options and we've pretty much cruised them all on the US saltwater coasts.
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Old 01-07-2019, 04:07 AM
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Good luck, op. Wife and I are retired and are looking for a place at the coast now. We are focusing on coastal Delaware and NC (likely Hampstead to Wilmington or perhaps Swansboro/CC). Our “plan” is to buy as a 2nd home now that we can morph into full time when family responsibilities allow x years from now.
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Old 01-07-2019, 05:56 AM
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
I'd say size, political leanings, economic diversity, "college town" atmospheres, % of yankee transplants, and a few other factors. Not that I would move to Asheville, but I can't imagine SC having a place like Asheville. It reminds me of Austin vs the rest of Texas.

There's nothing wrong with a place being labelled as Southern - how many folks leave the Carolinas to retire up North?
Not trying to be argumentative, but based on some of the things you dislike up north, what do you like about Asheville? Clemson SC is one of my favorite college towns. Nothing in NC can match a football game day in Clemson.
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Old 01-07-2019, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
I promise I won't. Despite living in Massachusetts, I've never voted Democrat, I have a Class A LTC (along with a C&R license), and wife is a 20 year Army veteran. Trust me, we're outnumbered up here!
Welcome to NC
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Old 01-07-2019, 01:20 PM
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Thought I would post this for you to make the transition easier.....

ADVICE FOR ANYONE MOVING TO NORTH CAROLINA

1. Save all bacon grease. You will be instructed later how to use it.
2. If you do run your car into a ditch, don't panic. Four men in the cab of a four wheel drive with a 12-pack of beer and a tow chain will be along shortly. Don't try to help them. Just stay out of their way. This is what they live for.
3. Remember: "Y'all" is singular. "All y'all" is plural. "All y'all's" is plural possessive.
4. Get used to the phrase "It's not the heat, it's the humidity". And the collateral phrase "You call this hot? Wait'll August."
5. Don't tell us how you did it up there. Nobody cares.
6. If you think it's too hot, don't worry. It'll cool down-in December (if ur lucky)
7. A Mercedes-Benz is not a status symbol, a Chevy, Dodge, or Ford is.
8. If someone says they're "fixin" to do something, that doesn't mean anything's broken.
9. The value of a parking space is not determined by the distance to the door, but the availability of shade.
10. If you see a slower moving vehicle on a two lane road pull onto the shoulder that is called "courtesy".
11. BBQ is a food group. It does NOT mean grilling burgers and hot dogs outdoors.
12. Yes, weddings, funerals, and divorces must take into consideration Football games.
13. Everything is better with Ranch dressing.
14. DO NOT honk your horn at us to be obnoxious, we will sit there until we die.
15. We pull over and stop for emergency vehicles to pass.
16. We pull over for funeral processions, turn our music off and men remove hats or caps. Some people put their hand over their heart.
17. "Bless your Heart" is a nice way of saying you're an idiot.
18. No mater what kind : sprite, coke, pepsi, mtn dew, its called Soda
19. If you don't like the weather in North Carolina , wait 15 minutes, it will change.😂😂
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Old 01-11-2019, 03:17 AM
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Originally Posted by goheelzfan View Post
What makes an area less "Southern"? Is it the yankee transplants? Is it the climate? Eastern NC is not much different than SC, GA, AL or rural FL. You can't judge eastern NC based off visiting RDU, Wilmington or the OBX areas in the summer. That is not eastern NC.
I don’t mean “southern” in a negative way and I don’t think others did. For me personally, and again this isn’t to offend anyone, but it’s religion and politics. Same way you can say somewhere is too “northern”. When you are in one of the extremes it’s very difficult to fit in when your beliefs are a mix of both. People in the extremes who never left only understand their problems and priorities and don’t understand there are other parts of the country with different problems and priorities.

For example, to quote Ron White, people in the south want to build a wall, people in the north want to build a giant NET to stop all those fucking Canadian geese.
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:09 AM
  #35  
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I went to college in GA, met my wife in NC, and have lived in KY & SC, but spent most of my career in the northeast. When we retired, we wanted to move south primarily because, in our prior experience, there is better climate, lower cost, less stress and the people tend to be friendlier.

Yes, winters here are far superior. When I bitch because I have to put pants on, you know I've become spoiled. It may be in the 20's as I type this, but the beautiful sunshine beats the crap out of the gray, dismal northeast.

My property taxes on the house, personal property taxes on two vehicles and my boat, homeowner's/flood/wind & hail insurance on the house and pier/lift/floating dock (yes, they're insured), plus insurance on the cars and boat - COMBINED - are less than half of what my property taxes were in PA.

The vast majority of the locals I routinely deal with are fantastic, and it appears that most of the folks in the area (at least those I've met) just appreciate what we've got here, are not looking to make it into "Jersey Shore South", and all get along no matter what our backgrounds. I think that's because we judge people on their own merits, not based upon a stereotype.. Sure, I've met a few jerks from St. James, but I've met some great folks from there as well, and I've run across a few locals that were total assholes, too. It's called "people", and applies everywhere.

Why WOULDN'T I want to live here?!?!?!
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Old 01-11-2019, 05:31 AM
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Might want to look at St Augustine Florida also....
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Old 01-13-2019, 10:06 AM
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Winters in NC are awesome. Enough of a change to keep it interesting, but not really cold. We love NC. Beaches are some of the best.
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Old 01-13-2019, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by goheelzfan View Post
Not trying to be argumentative, but based on some of the things you dislike up north, what do you like about Asheville? Clemson SC is one of my favorite college towns. Nothing in NC can match a football game day in Clemson.
I was using Asheville as an example of the differences of NC vs SC, and that it reminded me of Austin vs the rest of Texas. I in no way meant "more southern" to sound disparaging in any way.
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Old 01-15-2019, 02:59 PM
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How is Murrells Inlet?
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Old 01-15-2019, 08:37 PM
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Originally Posted by raybark View Post
I went to college in GA, met my wife in NC, and have lived in KY & SC, but spent most of my career in the northeast. When we retired, we wanted to move south primarily because, in our prior experience, there is better climate, lower cost, less stress and the people tend to be friendlier.

Yes, winters here are far superior. When I bitch because I have to put pants on, you know I've become spoiled. It may be in the 20's as I type this, but the beautiful sunshine beats the crap out of the gray, dismal northeast.

My property taxes on the house, personal property taxes on two vehicles and my boat, homeowner's/flood/wind & hail insurance on the house and pier/lift/floating dock (yes, they're insured), plus insurance on the cars and boat - COMBINED - are less than half of what my property taxes were in PA.

The vast majority of the locals I routinely deal with are fantastic, and it appears that most of the folks in the area (at least those I've met) just appreciate what we've got here, are not looking to make it into "Jersey Shore South", and all get along no matter what our backgrounds. I think that's because we judge people on their own merits, not based upon a stereotype.. Sure, I've met a few jerks from St. James, but I've met some great folks from there as well, and I've run across a few locals that were total assholes, too. It's called "people", and applies everywhere.

Why WOULDN'T I want to live here?!?!?!
Didn't you just move there?
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