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Offshore drilling in N.C.

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Old 01-12-2018, 07:37 PM
  #101  
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Originally Posted by hammerdown777 View Post
This is simply not accurate and you are misinterpreting the data. In 2016, U.S. net imports (imports minus exports) of petroleum from foreign countries were equal to about 25% of U.S. petroleum consumption. The percentage is indeed declining as back in 2011 it was over 50%....large part due to our shale oil (fracking) has been so successful.
Shale oil and fracking are not closely related to each other.
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:51 PM
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He's not cutting safety, he's taking hands out the cookie jar. Can everyone agree too much government regulation and red tape can be bad or counterproductive? Or not this time? As I've already shown, oil companies only make about a 6% profit on what they spend, lets not act like that's huge.

There will still be USCG inspections, Class Society inspections, and government watch dogs like BSEE and BOEM. It's not the Wild West!

There are checks for everything and the DWH was a huge wakeup call for the industry. But if anyone is curious, research the safety record of the drilling industry. It's quite impressive. As I have stated many times, the oil companies want to make money, not spend it cleaning up spills. They take safety very serious.
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:58 PM
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Wonder where they would put all the crew boats and supply boats? Then you need huge areas for all the drilling equipment and rigs?

I know it wouldn't be anything like here in LA.

But its like its own city down where all the boats stay at. Huge place.

300 plus footers everywhere.

The only inlet they could work out of that I could think of would be Beaufort.

It would need a facelift IMO.
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:09 PM
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Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
He's not cutting safety, he's taking hands out the cookie jar. Can everyone agree too much government regulation and red tape can be bad or counterproductive? Or not this time? As I've already shown, oil companies only make about a 6% profit on what they spend, lets not act like that's huge.

There will still be USCG inspections, Class Society inspections, and government watch dogs like BSEE and BOEM. It's not the Wild West!

There are checks for everything and the DWH was a huge wakeup call for the industry. But if anyone is curious, research the safety record of the drilling industry. It's quite impressive. As I have stated many times, the oil companies want to make money, not spend it cleaning up spills. They take safety very serious.
So the guy in this thread who works in the industry and has stated spills are fairly routine (maybe not big enough to elicit any news) is lying?
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by ECU_Pirate View Post
So the guy in this thread who works in the industry and has stated spills are fairly routine (maybe not big enough to elicit any news) is lying?
Not sure what you're trying to say as your statement isn't complete, but where do you see spills are routine?
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Old 01-12-2018, 08:54 PM
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Seems like a lot of keyboard cowboys that learned there information from a second hand source.
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Old 01-12-2018, 09:13 PM
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Originally Posted by one wolf View Post
Shale oil and fracking are not closely related to each other.
What?

Hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is a technique designed to recover gas and oil from shale rock
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Old 01-13-2018, 12:20 AM
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Sorry you're right I was thinking oil sands.
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Old 01-13-2018, 01:51 AM
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I find it comical that the very people demonizing "big oil" live modern lives, some with multiple homes. Do these people horseback between their homes? To work? To the grocery store?

Complaining about big oil does zilch. Big oil is necessary, and I for one am happy they do what they do thereby allowing me to live a prosperous and fun to live life. I'm not willing to give up driving, offshore fishing, and flying because snowflake types are "offended" or think they can impose their beliefs on others. F'em and the algore horse they rode in on.
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Old 01-13-2018, 04:24 AM
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Originally Posted by baypro21 View Post
I find it comical that the very people demonizing "big oil" live modern lives, some with multiple homes. Do these people horseback between their homes? To work? To the grocery store?

Complaining about big oil does zilch. Big oil is necessary, and I for one am happy they do what they do thereby allowing me to live a prosperous and fun to live life. I'm not willing to give up driving, offshore fishing, and flying because snowflake types are "offended" or think they can impose their beliefs on others. F'em and the algore horse they rode in on.
So who sounds like the snowflake with the twisted panties here now?
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Old 01-13-2018, 04:39 AM
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Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
He's not cutting safety, he's taking hands out the cookie jar. Can everyone agree too much government regulation and red tape can be bad or counterproductive? Or not this time? As I've already shown, oil companies only make about a 6% profit on what they spend, lets not act like that's huge.

There will still be USCG inspections, Class Society inspections, and government watch dogs like BSEE and BOEM. It's not the Wild West!

There are checks for everything and the DWH was a huge wakeup call for the industry. But if anyone is curious, research the safety record of the drilling industry. It's quite impressive. As I have stated many times, the oil companies want to make money, not spend it cleaning up spills. They take safety very serious.
Have a good friend who lost a family member on DWH. As you can imagine she would not agree with your plea to decrease safety regulations, in particular those put in place after the incident with the intent of not repeating it. Yes it’s inherently a risky and dangerous business, but why increase same when one believes lives matter more than “efficiencies” (aka profits)? Simple...money, profits are now the highest priority in this Administration and in the industry that lobbies them prodigiously. Perhaps you can’t see it that way, but others with more skin in the game do.
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Old 01-13-2018, 04:59 AM
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Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
Not sure what you're trying to say as your statement isn't complete, but where do you see spills are routine?
I said so. Let's use the FAA analogy here.

As I believe was mentioned earlier, there are many, many plane crashes, or "incidents" that happen on a daily basis. The FAA tracks every last one of them, be we do not hear of them at all unless it is of local interest, or of an unusual or catastrophic level. I was in a plane crash in Parkersburg WV once (nose wheel collapsed when a gust of wind "slapped" the commuter plane down into a snow drift while attempting to take off; being forced to spend another night in Parkersburg, and needing clean shorts were the extent of the "injuries"). It was never reported on the news, but my career-FAA father, who knew I was going to be in the area, knew all about it within hours, while I was still asleep in the hotel.

The release of oil is similarly common, ranging from leaking fittings, to drilling breakthrough surges, to equipment failure, and more. Most major oil companies track those of "significant" volume - usually from equipment failure - and are required to report them to the EPA and/or USCG is they are of a "reportable quantity". Even most of those are not "newsworthy" to the networks, but they still happen. Again, it is only those of local interest, or unusual or catastrophic scale that we hear about.

Thinking that spills are either either catastrophic or "don't happen" is idiotic.

It is actually so prevalent that oil companies maintain remediation crews. You'd never do that if they were so rare. I was part of a project that developed an environmentally-sound method of remediation that didn't kill the native flora and fauna, as "steam cleaning" and detergents do. But I suppose you're right - the company did that for political purposes, not because there was a need.
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Old 01-13-2018, 05:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Harley17 View Post
Have a good friend who lost a family member on DWH. As you can imagine she would not agree with your plea to decrease safety regulations, in particular those put in place after the incident with the intent of not repeating it. Yes it’s inherently a risky and dangerous business, but why increase same when one believes lives matter more than “efficiencies” (aka profits)? Simple...money, profits are now the highest priority in this Administration and in the industry that lobbies them prodigiously. Perhaps you can’t see it that way, but others with more skin in the game do.
Trump is beholding to no one - he even donates his salary.

So this won't get bilged ...

Why are broke "politicians", in their own words, now worth 1 or 200 million, or more???

Obama signed into law many regulations that hamstring business putting us at a competitive disadvantage while countries like China have no regulations.

We have good clean air and water policies now. There are many motivations for a government to make regulations - sometimes the least of which is to benefit the public.

Question authority.
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Old 01-13-2018, 05:38 AM
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Originally Posted by baypro21 View Post
I find it comical that the very people demonizing "big oil" live modern lives, some with multiple homes. Do these people horseback between their homes? To work? To the grocery store?

Complaining about big oil does zilch. Big oil is necessary, and I for one am happy they do what they do thereby allowing me to live a prosperous and fun to live life. I'm not willing to give up driving, offshore fishing, and flying because snowflake types are "offended" or think they can impose their beliefs on others. F'em and the algore horse they rode in on.
Sigh, who said it was all or nothing? No one is doubting the need for oil, but it is appropriate to question the risk vs reward to increase supply capacity by opening up new areas at this time. We do not have a supply issue, and new technologies are expanding options every day.
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Old 01-13-2018, 05:44 AM
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Originally Posted by captainmarknc View Post
Trump is beholding to no one - he even donates his salary.

So this won't get bilged ...

Why are broke "politicians", in their own words, now worth 1 or 200 million, or more???

Obama signed into law many regulations that hamstring business putting us at a competitive disadvantage while countries like China have no regulations.

We have good clean air and water policies now. There are many motivations for a government to make regulations - sometimes the least of which is to benefit the public.

Question authority.
How about questioning your sources? So having no regulations is good?

As for Trump, other than his crank it seems likely we are going to find out soon enough who he is actually beholden to. Stay tuned.

As for clean air and water policies...I’ll be interested in your take on GenX here in southeastern N.C.
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Old 01-13-2018, 05:47 AM
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I, certainly, am not demonizing big oil. Big oil provided me with a long, rewarding career. (In plants, in the lab, in the field, and at corporate headquarters.)

It also provided me with first-hand knowledge that "shit happens", and I would prefer to not put the NC coast at risk if it was to happen here.
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Last edited by raybark; 01-13-2018 at 08:08 AM.
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:12 AM
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Genx? as I understand it the company had a permit to dump the stuff in the CF river. someone in the government failed to take a look at this company in a timely manner since the permit had expired and they were still dumping it. EPA may have too many small rules and regulations to enforce the bigger threats.
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by SaltyDawg86 View Post
He's not cutting safety, he's taking hands out the cookie jar. Can everyone agree too much government regulation and red tape can be bad or counterproductive? Or not this time? As I've already shown, oil companies only make about a 6% profit on what they spend, lets not act like that's huge.

There will still be USCG inspections, Class Society inspections, and government watch dogs like BSEE and BOEM. It's not the Wild West!

There are checks for everything and the DWH was a huge wakeup call for the industry. But if anyone is curious, research the safety record of the drilling industry. It's quite impressive. As I have stated many times, the oil companies want to make money, not spend it cleaning up spills. They take safety very serious.
Would evaluating the oil industries safety record be akin to evaluating the safety record of the nuclear power industry?
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:31 AM
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Originally Posted by yknot fishing View Post
Genx? as I understand it the company had a permit to dump the stuff in the CF river. someone in the government failed to take a look at this company in a timely manner since the permit had expired and they were still dumping it. EPA may have too many small rules and regulations to enforce the bigger threats.
So is this situation a byproduct product of good/bad....past/current regulations, insufficient regulatory oversight...underlaps in oversight? I don’t know, but I do know that Culligan has a solid customer until it does get resolved. All being sorted out now, some of which will be born out through legal action it appears. Either way even if appropriate regs and processes are in place, inadequate oversight or enforcement will often lead to bad things happening.

Been a lively discussion. Now off to live my hypocrite life raping and pillaging the environment with my modern lifestyle while espousing ecological concerns and priorities. So, does this mean I need a horse or not? So confused.
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Harley17 View Post
How about questioning your sources? So having no regulations is good?

As for Trump, other than his crank it seems likely we are going to find out soon enough who he is actually beholden to. Stay tuned.

As for clean air and water policies...I’ll be interested in your take on GenX here in southeastern N.C.
I guarantee you our regulations are equal to or better than most countries. Sometimes they pass laws so that lawyers have something to do - or so they can fine a business for non-compliance.
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