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Dock Rebuild (again) - Hog Slat v. Flow-Through poly decking

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Dock Rebuild (again) - Hog Slat v. Flow-Through poly decking

Old 09-24-2019, 06:01 PM
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I watched the video and looked at the ideas here especially with the metal grating.
Bottom line is what survives almost 100% of the time, the round posts.

I think using all round material would be a game changer. Piles then the purlins attached to the piles. Then poles as joists sitting on the purlins. A 2" round cross member spanning across the joists at 16" oc and finally the decking. In this way you avoid the pressure and lift that a wave striking a flat timber causes on the bottom of the decking.

I bet it would not be all that cost prohibitive either.
Old 09-25-2019, 12:02 PM
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Bought a property on the pamlico with a 140 foot slat pier.
pier was built in 2006, still has original slats and pilings!
I've got several neighbors with wood decking that was torn up last fall, still waiting for repairs!
A consideration with slats is you'll use far fewer piles than with any other decking that I'm aware of, mine are 10' apart.
very sorry so many are faced with this right now.



Last edited by plug tackle; 09-25-2019 at 12:03 PM. Reason: Typo
Old 09-25-2019, 01:05 PM
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Originally Posted by plug tackle View Post
Bought a property on the pamlico with a 140 foot slat pier.
pier was built in 2006, still has original slats and pilings!
I've got several neighbors with wood decking that was torn up last fall, still waiting for repairs!
A consideration with slats is you'll use far fewer piles than with any other decking that I'm aware of, mine are 10' apart.
very sorry so many are faced with this right now.
Glad to hear your dock has fared so well with all the major hurricanes it has seen since 2006. I am very happy with mine. In Florence, my neighbor's 10'x12' platform came loose stringers and all. He'd done a great job over the years replacing his decking nails with screws, but had done nothing to replace his stringer fasteners. His whole platform, intact, ended up with a corner wedged between two of my walkway pilings resting/dangling on my 4x6 edge band. The only damage to my dock was where a protruding stringer nail bounced around and drug across the 4x6 until the wind/tide shifted and it went back his way.

I went with an 8' spacing for strength. As Plug mentioned, the downside is it will require two more pilings per 40-feet of run. The positive is that wave and swell loading is spread over 8' versus 10' of slat at the same thickness, which is 4" for both lengths. It was what the slat manufacturer recommended he would do if it was his dock...and he has one. It would be interesting to see the loads caused by waves and swells. I'm sure there is a data sheet on the slats for capacity.
Old 09-26-2019, 05:42 AM
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Drive around in a skiff and see who's dock is still intact. Build that one. I had a home on the Neuse and used hog slats. Survived 2 hurricanes with storm surge like the video in this thread.
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Old 09-26-2019, 08:23 AM
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I would just like to find someone to repair our dock
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Old 10-04-2019, 06:01 AM
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We are repairing about a 150' 15-year old dock - just bought the house and the post-Florence dock came "as-is". The pilings appear to be in good shape but are too small to support hog slats. We're considering the poly flow through option and one contractor said he has done some where they alternate wood and the flow through sections to keep the cost down. We have another property where we built a new dock and used bolted down hog slats - it survived Florence intact - so, if we were building new we know we would do that, but for now we want to use the existing pilings.

My question - did anybody out there in the NC area have flow through BEFORE Florence and how did it fare?
Old 12-12-2019, 04:44 AM
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Not sure if anybody is still looking at options, we've been doing Touchless covers in NE Florida but recently became Titan Decking dealers to help solve some of our customers issues (high tides and light pass-through to offset sq ft over water/DEP-EPA mandates), as well as we wanted to Titan our own decks. Since we just got on with them we have a promo for any sales through the end of the year so if you're already looking at it, can ship it direct from factory to your house. We've enjoyed the decking on our floating dock we just refitted. Anyways, offering it up as a solution and passing the savings on. If interested, take a look at the site and let me know what lined you're interested in, how much, and I'll shoot you a price. Mods, feel free to delete if not allowed.
Old 03-03-2020, 12:39 PM
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I also built a dock in front of my house a couple of years ago, but it was destroyed after a hurricane. When I rebuilt it I used composite decking to make it more durable and resistant. I remember my friend recommended to use wood for the dock, but I decided that composite boards would be better. I was right, the composite sheets that I bought from dino decking are very good, seem to be durable and until now look very good. I'm satisfied with the result.
Old 03-03-2020, 05:34 PM
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Time for an update since this thread popped back up today. After endless consultation and research, I finally decided to install Fibergrate decking. I was ready to do hogslat initially, but I'm doing the work myself, and it's just too heavy. The fiberglass reinforced plastic has excellent flow throw coefficients (62%), and is light enough for me to install. My progress has been pretty slow, but picking up pace. I'm just about finished upgrading the headers to 4x10s. Still a few more spans and then I'll start bolting the 4x6 joists. These are weekend projects, so it will be a while between updates. Hopefully the water starts warming soon. There have been some chilly days in the wetsuit!

Old 03-04-2020, 01:15 PM
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Originally Posted by hooligan_joe View Post
Time for an update since this thread popped back up today. After endless consultation and research, I finally decided to install Fibergrate decking. I was ready to do hogslat initially, but I'm doing the work myself, and it's just too heavy. The fiberglass reinforced plastic has excellent flow throw coefficients (62%), and is light enough for me to install. My progress has been pretty slow, but picking up pace. I'm just about finished upgrading the headers to 4x10s. Still a few more spans and then I'll start bolting the 4x6 joists. These are weekend projects, so it will be a while between updates. Hopefully the water starts warming soon. There have been some chilly days in the wetsuit!
That looks really good. A couple thought from a carpenter that built my own pier.
What do you think of adding a couple blocks between the 4x10 purlins. I bet the scrap is still on site. A couple 60d nails at each end.

My other thought is galvanised threaded rods in a x or z pattern to tie the piles to each other. The piling flex is probably a good bit part of the decking fails.
Thankfully my piers have not been trashed because of where they are.
Nice job on your part.
Old 03-23-2020, 01:04 PM
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A sheet of starboard and this is just about done.
Old 03-24-2020, 10:58 AM
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That looks really good. I especially like the fish cleaning table. I might have to borrow that design. Did you build a slant into it to drain away from the dock?

Here's where I'm at. I'd say about 25% of the framing complete. I'll put some grating on next and start building out so I don't have to spend as much time in the water. Slow progress because of all the drilling and bolting, but I'm getting there. I'm off island now for at least a couple weeks. Will return after I get one of those owner permits so I can finish the house repairs as well. Tough timing on this coronavirus mess. Stay safe.

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Old 03-24-2020, 12:17 PM
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Hooligan Joe- Very nice framing work there! Stout!!! That's not going anywhere if the pilings have firm footing to prevent lift. Question: Are you following the manufacture's framing guidelines for the Fibergrate decking or designing it yourself?
Old 03-24-2020, 01:21 PM
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Thanks. They helped me with the engineering, including sending all the deflection specs, and this design exceeds all pedestrian parameters. The math says it's beefy, but we won't know for sure until the next storm. I had to make a few mods above what they recommended, and I'll explain more when I get to that point and have additional photos. The pilings are 30' and the water is 5' at the end, so they are stuck deep.
Old 03-24-2020, 03:39 PM
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Good moves. Hog slat is great for anchoring a mooring, but damn tough on barefoot tootsies when use as docking material. And small stuff seems to be attracted to the open parts.
Old 03-29-2020, 07:22 AM
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Originally Posted by hooligan_joe View Post
That looks really good. I especially like the fish cleaning table. I might have to borrow that design. Did you build a slant into it to drain away from the dock?

Here's where I'm at. I'd say about 25% of the framing complete. I'll put some grating on next and start building out so I don't have to spend as much time in the water. Slow progress because of all the drilling and bolting, but I'm getting there. I'm off island now for at least a couple weeks. Will return after I get one of those owner permits so I can finish the house repairs as well. Tough timing on this coronavirus mess. Stay safe.

From a pro that builds hog slat and regular docks on salt water-you have a couple of issues readily apparent
#1- the 2x8 used in the framing do not appear to be marine grade- they should be a minimum of .60 CCA treated( saltwater splash) Why are the 2x8's even being used? They are not necessary.
#2- the counterbores for the vertical timber bolts are excessive- they will allow for water to pool and accelerate rot and corrosion.
Someone suggested cross bracing with threaded rod- if you do that use stainless. A much easier alternative is stainless eye bolts, stainless cable and turnbuckles. Be aware that pilings are not always treated all the way through and any holes through the center of the pilings below water line reduce the life span of the pilings.
We cross brace with 2.5 CCA marine treated ( same treatment as the pilings) 2x6 or 2x8 secured with SST 20D ring shank nails- much more cost effective, much easier install, mush easier replacement if needed.

Post some pics with the poly decking- we are going to start offering that very soon.
Old 03-29-2020, 05:54 PM
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Probably all good advice. Just fill the tops of the holes with epoxy or 5200. Use the BEST wood. It last much longer. looking forward to seeing this project completed.
Old 03-30-2020, 05:27 AM
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You got me on the counterbores. The first several are sloppy. I'll have to fill them and do better on the remaining. The 2x8s are supposed to be marine treated; I asked for and paid for it. Says so on my receipt, but I agree they look more like PT. It's hard to tell from the picture, but the 2x8s extend upward about an inch and are intended as rails to box in the grating. I actually ripped them just enough so the grating will lay flush. Then on top of each rail and its adjacent 4x6 I plan to put in a 2x6 cap of TanDeck to lock down the grating. The M-style stainless clips that come with the grating look strong, but I'm not sure if they could handle angry Pamlico Sound in a hurricane. A cap might be overkill but the grating was expensive so I'd prefer to up the odds that it doesn't wash away. I'll post more pics next week.

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