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Sea hunt console work

Old 01-13-2018, 05:41 AM
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Default Sea hunt console work

Just bought this 202 triton. Love the ride of the boat and seems well built. However there is two major things I need to get done and one I can not DIY. I like the windshield and the grab rail but they are too high. I am also not a fan of the tinted glass. I want to have a windshield that is clear and have a grab bar fabbed up that looks just as the original in the photo but for the new shorter windshield.
Anyone have any suggestions on the following:
1) Where to get the windshield custom cut.

2) Where to have rail fabbed up to fit.

Second major thing I need to do is cut out and replace the rotted wood in the console that backs the steering wheel etc. I am planning on using the boat a lot this coming season and want to get this done ASAP. I am thinking I should cut a hole on the outside to chisel out the old wood. Sand the glass backer and clean it. Then epoxy in a piece of coosa board for the new backing and glass the outside and finish it off. Thoughts? FYI this will be my first job using fiberglass so I am open for suggestions.
See the pics for ideas
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Old 01-13-2018, 06:18 AM
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Is it possible to get inside the console and remove the wood from that side? That way you are not cutting into the exterior fiberglass and having to fair in new work area and repaint?

Where are you located.
Old 01-13-2018, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by skinaut View Post
Is it possible to get inside the console and remove the wood from that side? That way you are not cutting into the exterior fiberglass and having to fair in new work area and repaint?

Where are you located.
Yes I can almost stand up in this console. The only reason I thought to go from the outside in is that I wouldn't be trying to epoxy something up to a ceiling and having resin drip down all over the place. It certainly might be worth the shot to do it your way. I'll take another look at it.
Old 01-13-2018, 07:41 AM
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I would move that vhf to the other side. That would bug me having it right under steering wheel. I like your new plan in general though.
Old 01-13-2018, 07:46 AM
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Yah in the rough draft in the top right you’re going to see where it’s going as of right now
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Old 01-13-2018, 07:48 AM
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Originally Posted by flminnow View Post
Yah in the rough draft in the top right you’re going to see where it’s going as of right now
You're assuming I can see LOL. Sorry good choice!
Old 01-13-2018, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by cman55 View Post
You're assuming I can see LOL. Sorry good choice!
Old 01-13-2018, 04:32 PM
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Definitively go from the inside out when replacing the rotted wood. I wouldn't mount a compass in front of my main fishfinder/gps. I would get a nice handheld one and keep it on the boat.
Old 01-14-2018, 10:41 AM
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Originally Posted by NRGarrott View Post
Definitively go from the inside out when replacing the rotted wood. I wouldn't mount a compass in front of my main fishfinder/gps. I would get a nice handheld one and keep it on the boat.









Old 01-14-2018, 10:43 AM
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It’s not a huge area. Maybe 20 by 20. Anyway it will get done. And it will set me up to do the rewire job putting it all back together
Old 01-14-2018, 10:52 AM
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Can't help you on the glass work. For the windshield I recommend Allen Cesany at Cesany Plastics in Lauderdale. http://yachtwindows.com/cesany/windscreens/

If he hasn't already done a windshield for your model, you can send him the cure the one and just tell him what height you want it.
Old 01-14-2018, 08:55 PM
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That's a lot of open splices. I agree time for a rewire. I think someone already asked you, but where are you located? I have a piece of Coosa that should fit you can have for free if you need 3/4. I would label all the wires, then remove everything. I would cut the wood out with a circular saw with the blade set very carefully. Save the inside skin. Chisel the wood out, sand the area clean, wipe it with acetone and fresh rags. Then mask the heck out of the area, put thickened epoxy on the coosa on both sides, put the inside skin back on, and clamp the coosa and inside skin into the hole. After it kicks, grind everything back, and either tape over where the cuts were, or lay a piece of glass over everything. Not a difficult job, but a great introduction to fiberglass.
Old 01-15-2018, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by NRGarrott View Post
That's a lot of open splices. I agree time for a rewire. I think someone already asked you, but where are you located? I have a piece of Coosa that should fit you can have for free if you need 3/4. I would label all the wires, then remove everything. I would cut the wood out with a circular saw with the blade set very carefully. Save the inside skin. Chisel the wood out, sand the area clean, wipe it with acetone and fresh rags. Then mask the heck out of the area, put thickened epoxy on the coosa on both sides, put the inside skin back on, and clamp the coosa and inside skin into the hole. After it kicks, grind everything back, and either tape over where the cuts were, or lay a piece of glass over everything. Not a difficult job, but a great introduction to fiberglass.
I live in Oviedo FL. I think 3/4" coosa would do the job just fine. Trust me, all wires will be labeled....I've screwed that up before.
As for removing the old wood my thoughts are to get under the console after everything is clear. Then use a dremel multi max to cut out the rectangular shaped area and then chisel out the wood. I am leaving the glass that is the outter skin alone except for sanding it flush with the edges that remain from the glass that backed the wood.
As for using the coosa, when you say "Thickened epoxy" do you mean regular epoxy mixed with hardener or with some additional additive? And for the epoxy should I use vinyl resin or epoxy.
Once the coosa is wetted out should I put a layer of glass between it and the remaining outter skin of the console or just epoxy it right to the outter skin? As for clamping them together, the only option I can think of is to screw the coosa to the outter glass. There is no room for clamps. Then fill the screw holes later.
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Old 01-16-2018, 04:05 PM
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Your removal sounds spot on. I like using epoxy better than vinylester. It's easier for me to mix correctly, doesn't give me a headache, and it's stronger. After mixing epoxy it is called "straight", "neat", or just regular epoxy. If you want to glue two objects together you typically thicken the epoxy, using an additive like cabosil, wood flour, or something like that. This makes the epoxy more resistant to running out of the joint. No need to put a layer of glass between the coosa and the existing glass if using epoxy. Screwing through the outer glass to clamp the coosa isn't ideal. Filling the holes later is a pia, and wood screws tend to strip the glass out. Maybe wedge a board inside the console and have it push on the back of the coosa? Or drill holes through the coosa where you already have holes in the outer glass, and use bolts to bolt it in place while the epoxy kicks. Coat any bolt with johnsons paste floor wax to prevent it from being epoxied in place. Florida is a long way from Maryland for the coosa.
Old 01-17-2018, 02:07 AM
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Originally Posted by NRGarrott View Post
Your removal sounds spot on. I like using epoxy better than vinylester. It's easier for me to mix correctly, doesn't give me a headache, and it's stronger. After mixing epoxy it is called "straight", "neat", or just regular epoxy. If you want to glue two objects together you typically thicken the epoxy, using an additive like cabosil, wood flour, or something like that. This makes the epoxy more resistant to running out of the joint. No need to put a layer of glass between the coosa and the existing glass if using epoxy. Screwing through the outer glass to clamp the coosa isn't ideal. Filling the holes later is a pia, and wood screws tend to strip the glass out. Maybe wedge a board inside the console and have it push on the back of the coosa? Or drill holes through the coosa where you already have holes in the outer glass, and use bolts to bolt it in place while the epoxy kicks. Coat any bolt with johnsons paste floor wax to prevent it from being epoxied in place. Florida is a long way from Maryland for the coosa.
Thanks for the reply! Aside from what I have kinda picked up on youtube I am clueless about glasswork. Will west systems 105 epoxy with west systems 205 hardener mixed with west systems 404 adhesive filler do the trick?

And after it's bonded I'm guessing the back side should get use some filleting around the edges of the coosa to round it off a bit. Then wet in a layer of CSM followed by a layer of 6oz cloth? Below are some links to the materials I was thinking about using.

https://www.westmarinepro.com/buy/we...33?recordNum=1

https://www.westmarinepro.com/buy/we...78?recordNum=2

https://www.westmarinepro.com/buy/we...95?recordNum=2

https://www.westmarinepro.com/buy/ev...98?recordNum=2

https://www.westmarinepro.com/buy/we...02?recordNum=1
Old 01-17-2018, 03:29 AM
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It'd be very tempting to me to just buy another console.
Old 01-17-2018, 06:13 AM
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That sounds good. Maybe substitute the slow hardener for the fast. Also the West systems blushes, which you have to wash off before recoating. I usually use Raka, but it's not a big deal. You should attempt to duplicate the thickness of the inner skin, if you are not going to reuse it. Mat isn't needed with epoxy, but it will work to build thickness cheaply.
Old 01-17-2018, 07:06 AM
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Don't try to overthink this. Get a piece of 1/2" starboard that will cover the entire face of the console except about 1/2" from the edges.Get it beveled for a nice finished look. Leave some of the existing glass / wood material on the console top there for additional support. Tear out the rats nest of wiring and do it correctly, it's not tough, just tedious. Be sure to keep everything labeled and use only tinned wire and waterproof shrink wrap for all connections. Trying to laminate a new piece of wood underneath is not as easy as you think it is if you want it done correctly. Cesany Plastic is a good choice for the plastic, unless you have a local fab shop.
Old 01-17-2018, 07:53 AM
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As for the Windshield I found a Good Source that a Lot of the Manufacturers use. They do Very Nice work for at least half the Price of most others! Most Center Console Windshields are around $100 unless it is oversized.
Custom Mold and Tint Inc.
1991 Hwy 425 S.
Monticello, AR 71655

870-367-7083 ph.
870-367-9039 fax
Old 01-17-2018, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by AIKO AIKO View Post
As for the Windshield I found a Good Source that a Lot of the Manufacturers use. They do Very Nice work for at least half the Price of most others! Most Center Console Windshields are around $100 unless it is oversized.
Custom Mold and Tint Inc.
1991 Hwy 425 S.
Monticello, AR 71655

870-367-7083 ph.
870-367-9039 fax
They advertise a low price and rip you a new one on shipping. The custom windshield I ordered from them was shorter on one side than the other so it had to be sent back again. It'd be one of the last places on my list to buy again.

Almost forgot, it took nearly 3.5 months from shipping my old windshield, receiving the new one that was about an inch shorter on one side, shipping it back and getting a new one.

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