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Presealing wooden components - does it have to be resin?

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Presealing wooden components - does it have to be resin?

Old 06-12-2019, 06:23 AM
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Default Presealing wooden components - does it have to be resin?

Hey y'all. When I started my project I went with epoxy because I was already familiar with working with it in woodworking. But it's expensive, and I'm looking for ways to cut that down some. One of the things I thought of was is pre-sealing the wood. When I built the transom, I used two layers of 3/4 marine ply. After cutting and shaping them, I pre-sealed them with my epoxy. The first application practically disappeared into the wood. The second still had some dry looking spots where it soaked in, but I let that dry and sanded before applying a third, which sealed the pieces totally. But it took a little over a gallon to do that, and that was before I even started sandwiching them together and glassing it in.

The question is, do I really need to do that with my epoxy, or can I use something else, say thinned polyurathane, to seal the wood up with before covering it in epoxy and glass?

I'm giving some serious thought to switching to one of the esters, as I found a spot in the design I think I can do it without having to apply it over epoxy.
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Old 06-13-2019, 02:39 AM
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You can use poly or vinylester to seal your wood, but if you want to switch resins, you would need to sand the cured surface in order to get a good bond. An advantage of sticking with the same resin is you can save the sanding step and lots of time.

With epoxy, just roll on a hot coat of resin to seal the wood, wait until it tacks up and apply your laminations. This would be the same if you were working with all poly or all vinylester. After your hot coat, you can apply a new layer before the resin fully cures- no sanding.
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Old 06-13-2019, 06:22 AM
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Originally Posted by mshugg View Post
You can use poly or vinylester to seal your wood, but if you want to switch resins, you would need to sand the cured surface in order to get a good bond. An advantage of sticking with the same resin is you can save the sanding step and lots of time.

With epoxy, just roll on a hot coat of resin to seal the wood, wait until it tacks up and apply your laminations. This would be the same if you were working with all poly or all vinylester. After your hot coat, you can apply a new layer before the resin fully cures- no sanding.
So it would still need to be one of the resins, verses something like a couple of coats of Minwax polyurathane soaked into the plywood and then sand? I'm retired, so time is something I have more of than money.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:31 AM
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Originally Posted by scallen2112 View Post
So it would still need to be one of the resins, verses something like a couple of coats of Minwax polyurathane soaked into the plywood and then sand? I'm retired, so time is something I have more of than money.
The polyurethane would be an inferior sealer to polyester, vinylester or epoxy. If you’re glassing components anyway, why introduce a different chemistry? The savings won’t be that significant, probably less than most builders waste
during a build.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:34 AM
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OK. Thank you for the advice.
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Old 06-18-2019, 03:23 PM
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If something worked better than epoxy for sealing wood everyone would be using it and you’d already know about it.

Polyurethane would be about 10 steps down the ladder from the normal products, it would really be a waste of time and money.
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