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boat almost sunk

Old 02-01-2019, 06:52 AM
  #21  
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Originally Posted by TTaxi View Post
I would imagine a lot of water could also have entered at the low side scupper or the leaning hull.
Hopefully you found correct fluid levels at both crankcase and transmission dipsticks ( which only dip in the top of the fluid column), AND rechecked fluid color after running. Water could have entered and sat on the bottom of the pan or case as it is heavier, and top oil could look normal at rest. . Running the engine would mix any water with the rest.

If you smelled diesel , some fuel and water may have traded places in the tank as the heavier water settled in through the tank hull vent. Better sound the tank through the sender hole with a stick with Sar=Gel or Kolor-Kut water-indicating paste on the end if you aren't sure about fuel tank content. . But maybe if you were ralatively lucky, the hull vent fitting was high enough to not allow water in but became lower than the diesel in the titled tank and some fuel poured out?
Check /recheck the fuel filter/water- separator of course.

Hope your insurance company gets you squared away . Best luck for quick turnaround.
Thank's T
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Old 02-01-2019, 06:54 AM
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
They make the decision what units are dispatched and to where. Emergency or not, a sinking boat is going to get some attention. Fuel can leak and most agencies have a boom they can deploy to contain. 911 is just an entry point to dispatch. Calling a non-emergency number likely will get you at the same place or transferred to it. Should he have called 911? That is debatable but end of the day its not a big deal unless there were multiple emergencies at the same time and he tied up a line which is unlikely.
Most agencies have a boom to deploy??? You're kidding right? You have some bad info.
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Old 02-01-2019, 06:59 AM
  #23  
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Default Give the guy a break

OP, you don't have to automatically agree to everything the insurance company offers but if you don't start with them you may forfeit any coverage

See what the surveyor says and go from there. I wouldn't run the engines again until flushed out

The comments about tying up an emergency vehicle are wrong
I was a captain in my town's volunteer fire dept and we regularly went on non-emergency calls
Never a boat but several times to pump out basements
We did it gladly to help the community

As far as delaying emergency calls, it did not
Sometimes it even sped them up
If we were out on a call and a more serious call came in, we would get diverted to the new call
Because we were already on the rig we would move faster then if we had to respond to a page, drive to the house, gear up and then move

OP, good luck and let us know how it turns out

Nick
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:04 AM
  #24  
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I agree with Mystery. The 911 dispatchers assess the nature of the emergency from the call and make the appropriate dispatch decisions. While the OP should have called the non-emergency number in the first instance, why on earth attack the guy for calling 911? He was certainly correct to call for assistance thinking his boat might be sinking with water filling the bilge and a tank filled with fuel and an oil filled engine. Better safe than sorry.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:07 AM
  #25  
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This is pure gold. I try to tell people all the time the types of calls we get through 911 that have absolutely nothing to do with a life threatening emergency. But in someones mind, it's television's "Rescue 911" (Que music). Over flowing toilet, house water pipe busted, breaker popping, sink is clogged and won't unclog, power shut off for non payment, car repo'd for non payment, flat tire in drive way, can't afford a cab/uber and needs a ride, child refuses to go to school, child refuses to get out of car to go to school, come discipline my child, vehicle making a funny noise, cable tv is not working, something is wrong with satellite tv during the storm, and this list can continue. Now I can add; boat took on water while docked in a safe place, with no one in it, to remove said water for free.

And, No. No first responder needs "something to do" away from the daily grind. We have enough "to do" and your idea of a break is not a break. You are one of many who think that way. We have old man Harold who strained so hard to take a dump this morning that he thought he had a mini heart attack because of the sweating and pain. But hey, safety first.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:23 AM
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Very least I would coat the engine and trans with WD-40, Boeshield, Coorosion blocker, etc.

Anything else that was under water for that matter. Then change oil and transfluid and run the boat if possible to dry things out.

Don't let the Insurance Co. be responsible unless you don't want to keep the boat.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:32 AM
  #27  
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After reading the entire thread I'm still unsure why you're turning this over to an insurance company, especially since you've mentioned that you ran the engine. Is there water damage throughout the boat? Otherwise it seems like a couple of hours with a tub of wipes will take care of the water intrusion as well as you following the advice to change engine and trans fluids. Just because you have insurance doesn't mean you should make a claim if there's no massive damage.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by r_ventura_23 View Post
"Likely?" What if he did, and someone died because of it?
Originally Posted by miamisportsman View Post
Someone dies because now you have taken that unit out of service. So while the unit is dealing with a boat that has water in the bilge and a real emergency occurs...who is going to cover the real emergency? It would be another unit from another zone which will most likely double the response time. That is why you don't call 911 unless it's a true emergency
You know, they have Radios, and presumably they have the abiity to say, "Peace Out, Gotta go save a toddler."

I've seen the ambulance with two first responders parked at the lake a few miles from the firestation eating lunch.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by miamisportsman View Post
Most agencies have a boom to deploy??? You're kidding right? You have some bad info.
Yup, most towns/cities with waterways/ports have booms and access to spill kits. A boat sinking or fuel spill is a pretty common occurrence. They are also used when there is an accident and fuel spill next to a river, lake, pond, etc. I saw a boat go aground and there appeared to be some fuel/oil/lube leaking. FD went to their truck and pulled out a boom and deployed it. Didnt even have to go pick up one of the town's spill kits.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
You know, they have Radios, and presumably they have the abiity to say, "Peace Out, Gotta go save a toddler."

I've seen the ambulance with two first responders parked at the lake a few miles from the firestation eating lunch.
That ambulance parked at the lake could very well be staging as an ambulance that normally covers that area is out on a call, or is otherwise out of service.

Don't call 911 unless it's a true emergency.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:55 AM
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Originally Posted by bluevein View Post
Great info, thanks for contributing so much to help the situation.
If you happened to be a fireman you might realize sometimes they enjoy a break from the daily, horrible, blood and guts calls, and actually enjoy helping people.
Yeah, I know about helping people, I also know that our dispatch girls would ask if anyone was hurt, then they would tell you to call the non emergency line.
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Old 02-01-2019, 07:59 AM
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
Yup, most towns/cities with waterways/ports have booms and access to spill kits. A boat sinking or fuel spill is a pretty common occurrence. They are also used when there is an accident and fuel spill next to a river, lake, pond, etc.
I'm going to go ahead and correct you. Unless your talking about an agency other than Police or Fire. I am located in a large city/county with port access we do not carry booms or spill kits. Nor does the city/county that is south or north of us. Private companies carry this. If you call 911 yes we will respond but we do not carry the equipment to remedy a fuel spill on the water or to help right a sinking boat. With that being said the best course of action in this case would be to call a company like Tow Boat U.S. , Sea Tow, or whatever salvage company works your area.
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:12 AM
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You know, we can call 911 for possible environmental issues also. It would then be up to the dispatcher to determine what service is called out.
a sinking boat could be seen as an environmental issue, ya think?
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:13 AM
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Originally Posted by miamisportsman View Post
I'm going to go ahead and correct you. Unless your talking about an agency other than Police or Fire. I am located in a large city/county with port access we do not carry booms or spill kits. Nor does the city/county that is south or north of us. Private companies carry this. If you call 911 yes we will respond but we do not carry the equipment to remedy a fuel spill on the water or to help right a sinking boat. With that being said the best course of action in this case would be to call a company like Tow Boat U.S. , Sea Tow, or whatever salvage company works your area.
Then you should recommend your agency become better prepared with some basic equipment.

In the North east, most agencies do have access to spill kits/booms/etc. I have been to dozens of marinas and you can see the big spill kits/extra supplies in clearly marked dock boxes next to the PD boats. Some towns have Harbor Masters and fewer have FD boats but the FD may carry on their truck or at least they have access to it.

A lot of local PD/harbormaster/fire boats have access to pumps if they dont keep them on their boats. Again, another good recommendation for your agency to have access to a pump for an emergency. I can think of many situations where it would be useful outside of a sinking boat. Heck I carry a pump on my personal boat.
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:19 AM
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Originally Posted by BSL View Post
You know, we can call 911 for possible environmental issues also. It would then be up to the dispatcher to determine what service is called out.
a sinking boat could be seen as an environmental issue, ya think?
Yes, depending on the magnitude that is a possibility. Something like this wouldn't be considered an emergency and they would refer to a private company. Also the OP stated he "called 911 to get the local fire dept. to come and pump her out , they came but had no pump" That is not something the Fire department is set up for.
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:22 AM
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Originally Posted by miamisportsman View Post
Yes, depending on the magnitude that is a possibility. Something like this wouldn't be considered an emergency and they would refer to a private company. Also the OP stated he "called 911 to get the local fire dept. to come and pump her out , they came but had no pump" That is not something the Fire department is set up for.
In all the cases I have seen of fuel/oil spills involving overfilling a tank, rod holder, or boat aground, the PD/FD has deployed a boom. It sounds like things may be done differently down south. Heck no private company responded to the last call I saw and PD/FD/DEP/USCG all stopped by and left it up to the owner to decide what to do. He ended up getting some friends to bring equipment and dumpsters, they removed the fuel tank, and chopped up the boat.
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:30 AM
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Originally Posted by thefuzz View Post
That ambulance parked at the lake could very well be staging as an ambulance that normally covers that area is out on a call, or is otherwise out of service.

Don't call 911 unless it's a true emergency.
My point is that he didn't really consume the fire departments's resources. 911 Dispatchers will say, "That's not an emergency. We're not sending someone out."
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Old 02-01-2019, 08:31 AM
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Glad to see that 911 responded in such cases as well. Hope things are good now.
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Old 02-01-2019, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
My point is that he didn't really consume the fire departments's resources. 911 Dispatchers will say, "That's not an emergency. We're not sending someone out."
You would think that's the case but it's not. 9 out of 10 times dispatch is going to send a unit to investigate it and confirm that it's not an emergency. And while that unit is investigating, it will be out service.
Bottom line is most fire departments would try to help but Calling 911 for non emergency reasons does tie up resources. And the resources are NOT unlimited.
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Old 02-01-2019, 09:12 AM
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I think in our area if there is risk of a fuel spill on the water, or an actual fuel spill, the responding agency arrives, checks the situation out, and through dispatcher puts a call into a private remediation company. They come out and do the job, and the boat owner gets the bill. Seen the towboat companies do this, also seen the normally land based remediation company show up in situations where a boat was not needed. Never seen local LEO or CG actually doing the grunt work, unless to save a life or prevent injury.
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