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Hurricane Michael - How did your boat do?

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Hurricane Michael - How did your boat do?

Old 01-25-2019, 08:04 AM
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Default Hurricane Michael - How did your boat do?

If you live in an area that was hit hard by Hurricane Michael, tell us how your boat fared. Did you learn anything that might help others in the future?

The news teams, and society in general, are so fast to shift their attention away from natural disasters. For those who are living it day to day, the struggle is real and long term; whereas, some in unaffected areas don't give it a second thought after the news moves on within a few days to more important things like what Trump tweeted today, what statement was taken out of context and requires a mass apology, or maybe an update on the Kardashians who manage to hold the spotlight for years. All rants about the news aside, I live in Panama City (Ground Zero) and drive past areas where trashed, sunken boats are still being removed from the waters on a daily basis. I've been to the marinas where the boat slips and the boats that were in them look like a blender went through them, I drive past the marinas with the huge boat rack warehouses that still look like a demo crew was ordered to flatten them with the boats still inside. Being a life long boater and boating enthusiast, my heart goes out to the owners of these boats. I have always been curious to hear the stories of those whose boats made it through OK, those whose boats suffered from the wrath of the hurricane, and what insight they may have that can help another be successful in protecting their boat when the next big storm comes. Pics encouraged!

Me personally, I have 3 boats. 39 Topaz Royale, 30' Dorado, and an 18 Seaway. The Seaway and the Dorado were stored inside a building that stayed mostly in tact so they were not damaged. I put the Topaz outside, tucked up against the south side of the building. Little did I know that this placement would be the difference between a total loss and remaining unscathed. It was in the perfect spot as the 173 MPH gusts that were recorded on site were out of the North and NW. My Topaz was on the S/SE side of the building and perfectly protected from the F4 tornado strength winds. She didn't get a scratch on her. I couldn't believe it. It was 2 days after the storm before I could see it. During those 2 days, I thought for sure she was a gonner and literally got a little nauseous at the thought of the carnage that I was certain to find.

I got extremely lucky. From what I see around town and on the water, most others were not as fortunate as me.

So what is your story?

Last edited by Diesel Dawg; 02-10-2019 at 04:57 AM.
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Old 01-25-2019, 08:09 AM
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I live in Panama City and left both my boats underneath my pole barn. The pole barn has an enclosed section that was to the west of the boats. I parked two vehicles in front of them to block any winds from the east. Fortunately, neither boat had any damage. I lost a pump house, green house, and metal shed. My pole barn was ruined but still standing. I got lucky.
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:38 AM
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Well, I know not everyone has this or can use this during a storm or anything.. but what I like to do is use some good ole fashion common sense. Like if I see a massive hurricane coming towards me 3-4 days prior to it landing, my secret is to just move the boat out of the storms direction. Some people donít have this common sense stuff but it sure does work!
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:49 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike_ View Post
Well, I know not everyone has this or can use this during a storm or anything.. but what I like to do is use some good ole fashion common sense. Like if I see a massive hurricane coming towards me 3-4 days prior to it landing, my secret is to just move the boat out of the storms direction. Some people donít have this common sense stuff but it sure does work!
Sighhhh. You comment doesn't show that much common sense. What part of the country are you from?

So you are suggesting that people figure out where the storm isn't going to hit, and then haul their boats to one of those locations and then find a place to store it, and then go back and get it after the storm or stay away from their home the entire time.

Not everyone evacuates. The last thing you would want is for everyone that owns a boat to be clogging up the highways pulling their boats when people are evacuating. And hotel parking lots get pretty full just from vehicles, so now you're suggesting that some people block additional parking spots with their truck and trailer.

The OP stated that he has 3 boats. Are you suggesting that he move all three of them?

It really isn't as simple as you made it out to be, and involves a bit more common sense.
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Old 01-25-2019, 09:56 AM
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Originally Posted by rickpcfl View Post
Sighhhh. You comment doesn't show that much common sense. What part of the country are you from?

So you are suggesting that people figure out where the storm isn't going to hit, and then haul their boats to one of those locations and then find a place to store it, and then go back and get it after the storm or stay away from their home the entire time.

Not everyone evacuates. The last thing you would want is for everyone that owns a boat to be clogging up the highways pulling their boats when people are evacuating. And hotel parking lots get pretty full just from vehicles, so now you're suggesting that some people block additional parking spots with their truck and trailer.

The OP stated that he has 3 boats. Are you suggesting that he move all three of them?

It really isn't as simple as you made it out to be, and involves a bit more common sense.
this
im in Tallahassee and didnít get it nearly as bad as yíall. I was worried about my pole barn, so I took my pathfinder to a big empty lot at my in-laws. Some donít have that option and he had 4 other boats from friends and friends of friends. We were all fine. My buddy down the street didnít move his Grady white and it was totaled when a big pecan tree fell on it. progressive insurance took GREAT care of him. He came out way better than before the storm.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Saltygatorvet View Post


this
im in Tallahassee and didnít get it nearly as bad as yíall. I was worried about my pole barn, so I took my pathfinder to a big empty lot at my in-laws. Some donít have that option and he had 4 other boats from friends and friends of friends. We were all fine. My buddy down the street didnít move his Grady white and it was totaled when a big pecan tree fell on it. progressive insurance took GREAT care of him. He came out way better than before the storm.
This is going to make me sound like I live in a white trash neighborhood, but it is far from it. My neighbor had 4 boats and a big RV in his driveway, one of the boats is a 23 or 24 Sea Hunt that he bought this past summer. He left the plugs in the smaller boats so they filled up with water. Leaves clogged up the scuppers on the Sea Hunt so it filled up with water too. The weight of the water helped keep the boats in place. There is a 3 acre wooded lot that probably blocked some of the wind too, so that also helped.

I had thought about parking my SUV in front of my garage doors, but decided that I didn't want debris damaging it. I backed it in and loaded computers and change of clothes in case I needed to make a quick getaway.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike_ View Post
Well, I know not everyone has this or can use this during a storm or anything.. but what I like to do is use some good ole fashion common sense. Like if I see a massive hurricane coming towards me 3-4 days prior to it landing, my secret is to just move the boat out of the storms direction. Some people don’t have this common sense stuff but it sure does work!


Wow Mike, a lot of descriptors came to my mind about you when I read your comment. For diplomacy purposes, lets go with clueless. It is obvious you have no experience living in a hurricane prone area. Something you are missing in your "Common Sense" approach is that no one knows what these storms will do, where they will go, or how strong they will be. For example, this same storm that produced 175+ MPH gusts was predicted to be only a cat 1 hurricane 2 days before landfall. 1 day before landfall it went from a cat 1 to 2 to 3. When we woke up the morning of the day of the storm, it had strengthened to cat 4, possibly cat 5. Hurricane strength winds arriving in 5 hours. So tell me oh master of common sense, when would you have decided to abandon preparing your home for a cat 4 hurricane, abandon gathering necessary supplies to sustain you and your family's lives for several weeks, and instead turn your focus towards sitting in gridlocked traffic while trailering your boat to some secret spot that only you knew would be unaffected by the storm? Or maybe we should look at Hurricane Irma as an example. Forecasters said it might go up the east coast of FL, it might go up the west coats of FL. Nobody knew! Where would you go then with your boat Mr. Common Sense? Head inland right? Guess where that storm went.....right up the middle of the state.

In summary, using your "Common Sense" approach of "move the boat before the storm" during hurricane Michael, you may have saved your boat by taking it to some secret spot, that is somehow guaranteed to be out of harms way, but your home would be trashed because you did not prepare it and you would be without food, water or supplies for weeks. It would be tempting to swing by your tent in your front yard in front of your broken house to ask you how that common sense thing was working out for you, but that wouldn't be very nice, not to mention that you probably wouldn't be "home" anyway, too busy standing in line waiting for free handouts from FEMA. With hurricane Irma, you would have fled right into the path of the storm.....with your boat. Genius. Seems your common sense would have put you in serious harms way both times.
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Last edited by Diesel Dawg; 01-25-2019 at 11:30 AM.
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Old 01-25-2019, 10:54 AM
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Originally Posted by rickpcfl View Post
Sighhhh. You comment doesn't show that much common sense. What part of the country are you from?

So you are suggesting that people figure out where the storm isn't going to hit, and then haul their boats to one of those locations and then find a place to store it, and then go back and get it after the storm or stay away from their home the entire time.

Not everyone evacuates. The last thing you would want is for everyone that owns a boat to be clogging up the highways pulling their boats when people are evacuating. And hotel parking lots get pretty full just from vehicles, so now you're suggesting that some people block additional parking spots with their truck and trailer.

The OP stated that he has 3 boats. Are you suggesting that he move all three of them?

It really isn't as simple as you made it out to be, and involves a bit more common sense.
i was living in Tallahassee at the time, my boat was located in panacea Florida right in the panhandle where Michael hit. I simply went and trailered my boat out of there before the storm hit and took it to Jacksonville. Full life Floridian..
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:16 AM
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Mine is a 28 Wellcraft Coastal and lives on a trailer in CFl. For Irma I strapped it to the trailer with heavy duty ratchet straps and hoped for the best. She didnt budge. For Michael I'm far enough inland where it didnt bother us. However, I was working on her the other day and felt her move slightly with the wind on the trailer during a sudden gust. What I had planned on doing later in the year but may do it sooner is to put mobile home anchors down and strap 9ver her to them. I've seen it mentioned on other threads before and it seems to work. At least from flipping off the trailer. Storm debris is a different story.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:25 AM
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just got back from another trip to see my parents in PC -- that town is devastated, it wont be the same for many years

:-(

Last edited by Reel Irie; 01-25-2019 at 11:48 AM.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by Reel Irie View Post
just got back from another trip to see my parents in PC -- that down is devastated, it wont be the same for many years :-(
I don't think people realize how bad it is here. It is difficult to find a home that doesn't have significant damage. Most churches and businesses have a lot of damage too. I imagine that in 5 years there will still be buildings with damage.

To top it off, we had a storm move through the other night with 60 mph winds. My neighbor lost a good section of his metal roof after surviving the hurricane. Actually he came out better because his big hurricane deductible doesn't apply to this.
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Old 01-25-2019, 11:58 AM
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Imagine living in So Florida.. you have to drive 500 miles to get out of town. With get out of town traffic, last time I did that (three days early) I and at least five million other “get out of towners” got stuck in a massive traffic jam in Okeechobee. We were stuck in 100 degree heat for 6 hours. I sat and watched the gas gauge crawl from full to less than a quarter tank. By the time i got to kissimee there was no fuel to be had anywhere. I had to drve to a town midway between palm city and turnpike to find fuel. I got to Orlando at 5am. I got to macon, ga 2days later to catch up with the hurricane that had bypassed SO Fl and gone in thru jupiter. I drove throught 100 mph winds and flooding to get to Macon. The second time i went on i95. It took 35 hours to drive to Jacksonville. Neither time did i tow a boat. The third and last time I got stuck in Fort Pierce till midnight, searched for a hotel and onlyone I found was on the beach. The freaking hurricane took I-95 and exited in Hobe sound then headed North along the beach hit our hotel at 6 AM while we were sleeping. No i am not doing that shit again. I am staying at house or flying to CA next time.

Anyone that suggests hauling a boat out of town to escape a hurricane, or leaving the boat in middle of Everglades alone is a total absolute rampanging IDIOT!.

Leave it home, tie it best you can and forget it. Going out in 170 mph winds is suicidal. If you leave it in Everglades there will be nothing left there but a rolled bare hull. It will have been stripped clean.

Last edited by solarfry; 01-25-2019 at 12:09 PM.
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Old 01-25-2019, 12:02 PM
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We experienced very little from Michael in the Tampa Bay area, but Charlie and Irma gave us a pretty good scare. Both of those hurricanes were forecast to hit the Tampa Bay area directly, but both took a jog to the east down in south Florida. A buddy in my neighborhood fled to Orlando with his family during Charlie, and it followed them there. My neighbor stayed home for Irma, and said he'll never do it again. I prepared the house, strapped my boat to the lift cradle, strapped the cradle to the lift poles and went to my mother-in-law's condo. We made it through both events without damage fortunately. The winds were fierce enough to turn my outboard to full lock.

Michael was a storm that surprised everyone. I didn't even know it was in the Gulf until my son mentioned it. Another couple of hours and it would have definitely made it to Cat 5. I can't even imagine the destruction, but my heart does go out to anyone affected.
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Old 01-25-2019, 12:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Diesel Dawg View Post
Wow Mike, a lot of descriptors came to my mind about you when I read your comment. For diplomacy purposes, lets go with clueless. It is obvious you have no experience living in a hurricane prone area. Something you are missing in your "Common Sense" approach is that no one knows what these storms will do, where they will go, or how strong they will be. For example, this same storm that produced 175+ MPH gusts was predicted to be only a cat 1 hurricane 2 days before landfall. 1 day before landfall it went from a cat 1 to 2 to 3. When we woke up the morning of the day of the storm, it had strengthened to cat 4, possibly cat 5. Hurricane strength winds arriving in 5 hours. So tell me oh master of common sense, when would you have decided to abandon preparing your home for a cat 4 hurricane, abandon gathering necessary supplies to sustain you and your family's lives for several weeks, and instead turn your focus towards sitting in gridlocked traffic while trailering your boat to some secret spot that only you knew would be unaffected by the storm? Or maybe we should look at Hurricane Irma as an example. Forecasters said it might go up the east coast of FL, it might go up the west coats of FL. Nobody knew! Where would you go then with your boat Mr. Common Sense? Head inland right? Guess where that storm went.....right up the middle of the state.

In summary, using your "Common Sense" approach of "move the boat before the storm" during hurricane Michael, you may have saved your boat by taking it to some secret spot, that is somehow guaranteed to be out of harms way, but your home would be trashed because you did not prepare it and you would be without food, water or supplies for weeks. It would be tempting to swing by your tent in your front yard in front of your broken house to ask you how that common sense thing was working out for you, but that wouldn't be very nice, not to mention that you probably wouldn't be "home" anyway, too busy standing in line waiting for free handouts from FEMA. With hurricane Irma, you would have fled right into the path of the storm.....with your boat. Genius. Seems your common sense would have put you in serious harms way both times.
Whoever Mike is, he doesn't deserve this response as a matter of courtesy and secondly because he is mostly correct on the concepts......I belong to the Bill Anderson school of storm prep: "I gotta get while the gettin's good."

This isn't my first hurricane, either, in Southwest Florida and in the Panhandle. Three boats to deal with (54, 64, 72 sportfish); two airplanes (G-V and C560XL); one house; one beach condo.
  • Between 1990 and today, the NWS average track error at 48 hours from landfall exceeds 100 nm (it's getting better, but still around 75 miles).
  • During that period predicted intensity average error was in excess of 20 knots. (The thing to remember about averages is that if your head's in the freezer and your feet are in a furnance, your average temperature may be around 75 but you won't be comfortable.
  • Detailed planning, resource identification, and early action are, in my experience, key. If you wait for Jim Cantore and Stephanie Abrams to be on a plane to your neighborhood, you've probably waited too long.
  • Basic planning and preparation is common: have plan to move boats and aircraft to location outside of hurricane watch area not less than 48 hours before projected landfall anywhere within hurrican warning zone; plan includes evacuation locations, agreements with marina/hangar/airfield owners.
  • The aircraft are easy. The boats are a little harder, but 20 hours of running is at least 400 miles for planning purposes.
  • Insurance company pays for a fair portion of the relocation expenses.
  • Home/condo: secure shutters on beach condo and leave empty if in hurricane warning area; home -- I evacuate with boats before storm.
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Old 01-25-2019, 12:14 PM
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My boats are in Destin, the two smaller ones are on lifts, I raised them up as high as possible to avoid any surge. I am on a hurricane plan with a boat yard and they hauled the big boat out. Our area had no damage other than some palm tree branches fell. We were very fortunate, but we've been hit before!
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Old 01-25-2019, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Diesel Dawg View Post
Wow Mike, a lot of descriptors came to my mind about you when I read your comment. For diplomacy purposes, lets go with clueless. It is obvious you have no experience living in a hurricane prone area. Something you are missing in your "Common Sense" approach is that no one knows what these storms will do, where they will go, or how strong they will be. For example, this same storm that produced 175+ MPH gusts was predicted to be only a cat 1 hurricane 2 days before landfall. 1 day before landfall it went from a cat 1 to 2 to 3. When we woke up the morning of the day of the storm, it had strengthened to cat 4, possibly cat 5. Hurricane strength winds arriving in 5 hours. So tell me oh master of common sense, when would you have decided to abandon preparing your home for a cat 4 hurricane, abandon gathering necessary supplies to sustain you and your family's lives for several weeks, and instead turn your focus towards sitting in gridlocked traffic while trailering your boat to some secret spot that only you knew would be unaffected by the storm? Or maybe we should look at Hurricane Irma as an example. Forecasters said it might go up the east coast of FL, it might go up the west coats of FL. Nobody knew! Where would you go then with your boat Mr. Common Sense? Head inland right? Guess where that storm went.....right up the middle of the state.

In summary, using your "Common Sense" approach of "move the boat before the storm" during hurricane Michael, you may have saved your boat by taking it to some secret spot, that is somehow guaranteed to be out of harms way, but your home would be trashed because you did not prepare it and you would be without food, water or supplies for weeks. It would be tempting to swing by your tent in your front yard in front of your broken house to ask you how that common sense thing was working out for you, but that wouldn't be very nice, not to mention that you probably wouldn't be "home" anyway, too busy standing in line waiting for free handouts from FEMA. With hurricane Irma, you would have fled right into the path of the storm.....with your boat. Genius. Seems your common sense would have put you in serious harms way both times.
for irma my boat was in Atlanta because I didnít KNOW which coast would be safe. I have TWO generators one 10k one 2500 inverter, I have a 350 gallon gas tank, and normally you fill the bathtub up BEFORE the storm hits. In that case, my boats safe, we have PLENTY water (boiled first of course because itís sitting in the bathtub), and my windows have pre mounted hurricane shutter bolts installed as most FL homes do. Also, ALL my things are insured JUST in case.. the fact that all of you are flaming me for saying common sense is offensive just reiterates my original comment in the first place!!!! If you live in Florida, be prepared for a hurricane have a plan BEFORE the hurricane. Itís like I said ĎDRUMROLLLLLL COMMON FKIN SENSE!
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Old 01-26-2019, 04:15 AM
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My boat was at the bottom of the pile in Pirates Cove.

They finally craned it out just before Xmas...ttop crushed, a couple big holes in the cap, but nothing below the waterline. Took a few weeks of negotiation with insurance but they ultimately totaled it. I bought it back, cut off the top and was finally about to take it to a shop this week in Jacksonville (closest i could find that wasnít backed up for months).

Two nights ago my wife and I were debating on what color cloth to put on the new t-top. I started googling pictures and came across a for sale ad posted that day for our exact boat...original owner, excellent condition, only 300 hours. Bought it for the same price as our old boat and am literally typing this in the hotel on the way to the sea trial.

Crazy that itís worked out this way...Iíd like to think the big man upstairs is giving me a break.
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Old 01-26-2019, 06:34 AM
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Originally Posted by Mike_ View Post
Well, I know not everyone has this or can use this during a storm or anything.. but what I like to do is use some good ole fashion common sense. Like if I see a massive hurricane coming towards me 3-4 days prior to it landing, my secret is to just move the boat out of the storms direction. Some people don’t have this common sense stuff but it sure does work!
Dude starts a good thread asking about how your boats made it through the CAT4.95 monster. He is probably expecting pics and good stories, but…

Only 1.5hrs after his post, the thread is derailed by someone that doesn’t even live on the coast. Sorry OP.

Common sense certainly dictates that every time a CAT2 spaghetti line crosses your region in Florida, 3 days from landfall, you drag your boat to your secret safety spot in Atlanta.

You should not be worried about boarding up your house, checking your gennies, stockpiling ice/food/fuel/flashlights, developing an informed evacuation plan (in case you need to leave), securing EVERTHING outside, securing everything at your workplace, and HELPING your friends and elderly/disabled neighbors secure their homes.

Michael did not provide enough time to get everything mentioned above done. If “common sense” is prioritizing the evacuation of my boat over the security of my family/house/community, I don’t want it. I’ll stick with Honor, Courage, and Commitment.
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Old 01-26-2019, 06:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Diesel Dawg View Post
Wow Mike, a lot of descriptors came to my mind about you when I read your comment. For diplomacy purposes, lets go with clueless. It is obvious you have no experience living in a hurricane prone area. Something you are missing in your "Common Sense" approach is that no one knows what these storms will do, where they will go, or how strong they will be. For example, this same storm that produced 175+ MPH gusts was predicted to be only a cat 1 hurricane 2 days before landfall. 1 day before landfall it went from a cat 1 to 2 to 3. When we woke up the morning of the day of the storm, it had strengthened to cat 4, possibly cat 5. Hurricane strength winds arriving in 5 hours. So tell me oh master of common sense, when would you have decided to abandon preparing your home for a cat 4 hurricane, abandon gathering necessary supplies to sustain you and your family's lives for several weeks, and instead turn your focus towards sitting in gridlocked traffic while trailering your boat to some secret spot that only you knew would be unaffected by the storm? Or maybe we should look at Hurricane Irma as an example. Forecasters said it might go up the east coast of FL, it might go up the west coats of FL. Nobody knew! Where would you go then with your boat Mr. Common Sense? Head inland right? Guess where that storm went.....right up the middle of the state.

In summary, using your "Common Sense" approach of "move the boat before the storm" during hurricane Michael, you may have saved your boat by taking it to some secret spot, that is somehow guaranteed to be out of harms way, but your home would be trashed because you did not prepare it and you would be without food, water or supplies for weeks. It would be tempting to swing by your tent in your front yard in front of your broken house to ask you how that common sense thing was working out for you, but that wouldn't be very nice, not to mention that you probably wouldn't be "home" anyway, too busy standing in line waiting for free handouts from FEMA. With hurricane Irma, you would have fled right into the path of the storm.....with your boat. Genius. Seems your common sense would have put you in serious harms way both times.
agree 100%
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Old 01-26-2019, 07:05 AM
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I do not want to derail this thread because Michael had almost no effect on me but I feel like I have some experience being on the coast of NC. I grew up on the coast and when Florence came, it was slated as a cat 4-5 while making landfall prey much directly over our house on Atlantic Beach, NC. We are not on the beach but also around a 1/4 mile from the beach. Close enough. Had this prediction held, we would have lost our house and community on the coast and likely the Viking.

Our plan was pretty simple. We have never flooded so we put everything we could in the garage and tied down the heavy stuff to the posts. The shutters were closed and the hurricane screens were lowered.

We trailered the Jones Brothers and the Parker back inland to my shop in Greenville which is about 70 miles inland. We had the Regulator hauled and placed inside a warehouse in Morehead City since we do not have a trailer for it. We also hauled the Viking at True World Marine in Beaufort, NC. We stripped the curtains and taped every hatch with painters tape, Taped electronics covers, A/C vents and returns, cabin door, etc...... We then tied the riggers together and then to the tower to prevent swaying.

Once we were prepped, all we could do is wait and see as we rode the storm out inland.

We got EXTREMELY lucky. It lost a lot of steam and only came in as a cat 1 but it sat around for almost 2 days and dumped over 3’ of rain in areas. Most structures and trees are fine for a normal cat 1 but 36 hours of constant rain and wind took its toll and there were lots of areas that looked very similar to the panhandle. Had Florence acted normally and sped on through, most places would have been 100% in a few days but since it stuck around, lots of people are still recovering in major ways.

For you guys that stuck around for Michael, I can’t imagine as I was younger for our last majors. Florence sounded like a freight train and is was scary as hell listening to the wind and heard trees breaking off around. I hope all of you who havent been made whole, get there soon. We are all in this together and it was impressive to see people, on this forum even, step up and help in anyway they could.
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