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New Merc outboard shortage?

Old 01-12-2019, 03:35 PM
  #21  
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In September 2018 I tried to order that exact engine-225 HP from a few Mercury dealers--local and some of the larger dealers in the country.
I was told that it would take at least 160 working days and they wouldn't guarantee that.
I decided I couldn't wait 7-8 months or longer so I bought an Evinrude.
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Old 01-12-2019, 05:00 PM
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I wouldn’t expect a call saying there was a delay. That bad news is the kind of thing people procrastinate with and ignore. In my experience it’s up to me to find out there is a delay. You might be six months further down the road than you think and no one is going to tell you that unless you ask repeatedly
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Old 01-12-2019, 05:10 PM
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I have to think that boat builders and dealers are thinking what I am thinking. Place orders now to have some engines in the pipeline, regardless of your actual needs.
There is no penalty to not take an engine when ready if you don't need it. It simply goes to the next customer Mercury has in line.
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Old 01-12-2019, 05:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Parker Yacht View Post
Seriously?
Enough is enough.
This thread is about why Mercury can't supply the engines, do you have insight on that?
It's not about Yamaha's shortage of which, well, let's just say you are going in the wrong direction.
Care to explain why y’all were a Yamaha only dealer for years and only recently became a Mercury dealer? My insight comes from other dealers in similar situations.
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Old 01-12-2019, 06:43 PM
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Originally Posted by noelm View Post
Kind of interesting that Mercury can't supply motors and it's the fault of two presidents and various other companies, plus high demand, yet not long ago Yamaha couldnt supply engines and it was bad management and a poor product.
Don't you think that two major hurricanes a year ago in the Caribbean and the terrible hurricane that hit Florida this year had anything to do with supply and demand? And it didn't help Yamaha that they were making major manufacturing changes at the same time as the hurricanes. Then Mercury decided to do a 100% model changeover at the same time--a big marketing blunder.

And today, a motor is not a motor. Some are short shaft, some are long shaft and some are extra long shaft. Some motors are for electronic controls and some aren't. Then you have HO versions of motors. The combinations of the different motors is almost mind boggling. This is not the old days.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:37 PM
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Not too sure what any of that has to do with it, but now it's the weathers fault too?
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by noelm View Post
Not too sure what any of that has to do with it, but now it's the weathers fault too?

It is Yamaha's fault or Suzuki fault when anything happens to there motors. When something happens to any other motor brand it is the weather, the owner,the dealer who rigged it, or bad service tech's fault.

this is THT101
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:44 PM
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Someone said it previously and it made a lot of sense to me. Mercury expects demand to be let's say 20,000 motors total per year. 15,000 for new builds and 5,000 for repowers. They set up the plant to have capacity of 22,000 motors per year for a little cushion. Any more would be a waste of resources. They announce the new motors and for whatever reason demand is 40,000, 20,000 motors for new builds and 20,000 for repowers in the first year. Should they devote extensive resources to expand the production facility to 40,000 per year capacity? No, that would be a total waste of resources after the first year demand goes away. They have contractual obligations to manufacturers to supply motors so their 22,000 motors capacity is 20,000 for new builds and 2,000 for repowers. Next year maybe it goes back to the expected 15,000 and 5,000. If not, then maybe the realize their demand expectations were wrong and expanding the production facility may be warranted. But don't jump the gun.
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Old 01-13-2019, 02:07 AM
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Originally Posted by davidwademarine View Post


Care to explain why y’all were a Yamaha only dealer for years and only recently became a Mercury dealer? My insight comes from other dealers in similar situations.
I shouldn't have to and don't need to explain diddly squat to you.
But, in the essence on not telling you to pound sand.
A big portion of our customer base is the large yacht tender market. The outboard powered yacht tenders come with two engine brands, Yamaha and Mercury.
Originally Posted by Bamaman View Post
Don't you think that two major hurricanes a year ago in the Caribbean and the terrible hurricane that hit Florida this year had anything to do with supply and demand? And it didn't help Yamaha that they were making major manufacturing changes at the same time as the hurricanes. Then Mercury decided to do a 100% model changeover at the same time--a big marketing blunder.

And today, a motor is not a motor. Some are short shaft, some are long shaft and some are extra long shaft. Some motors are for electronic controls and some aren't. Then you have HO versions of motors. The combinations of the different motors is almost mind boggling. This is not the old days.
^^^^^^This^^^^^^^
Originally Posted by Locke N Load View Post
Someone said it previously and it made a lot of sense to me. Mercury expects demand to be let's say 20,000 motors total per year. 15,000 for new builds and 5,000 for repowers. They set up the plant to have capacity of 22,000 motors per year for a little cushion. Any more would be a waste of resources. They announce the new motors and for whatever reason demand is 40,000, 20,000 motors for new builds and 20,000 for repowers in the first year. Should they devote extensive resources to expand the production facility to 40,000 per year capacity? No, that would be a total waste of resources after the first year demand goes away. They have contractual obligations to manufacturers to supply motors so their 22,000 motors capacity is 20,000 for new builds and 2,000 for repowers. Next year maybe it goes back to the expected 15,000 and 5,000. If not, then maybe the realize their demand expectations were wrong and expanding the production facility may be warranted. But don't jump the gun.
^^^^^^^And This^^^^^^^
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Old 01-13-2019, 05:54 AM
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Kudos to the manufacturers in automotive and marine engines that build these complex machines that must have every single part in place in order to ship. But.......

My Sister in Law did purchasing for Hewlett Packard then Honda for the plant that made Accords. One every 59 seconds. She and some other Honda employees were sent to a vendor to work the night shift building headliners for a couple weeks one time to keep the supply chain intact. Other parts too. I had a friend build parts for them, Honda as an example and they required him to provide detailed labor and material costs. They said fine, that's what we will pay, if you want to make a profit, figure out how to make it faster / cheaper. How can a vendor ramp up without the expectation and realization of margins to fund expansion? My own labor cost has increased 30% this year. Its unlikely the engine vendors want any more volume than what they contracted for two or three years ago but have to deliver today at the old price."we lose money on every sale, but make it up in volume."
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Old 01-13-2019, 07:51 AM
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Originally Posted by Locke N Load View Post
Someone said it previously and it made a lot of sense to me. Mercury expects demand to be let's say 20,000 motors total per year. 15,000 for new builds and 5,000 for repowers. They set up the plant to have capacity of 22,000 motors per year for a little cushion. Any more would be a waste of resources. They announce the new motors and for whatever reason demand is 40,000, 20,000 motors for new builds and 20,000 for repowers in the first year. Should they devote extensive resources to expand the production facility to 40,000 per year capacity? No, that would be a total waste of resources after the first year demand goes away. They have contractual obligations to manufacturers to supply motors so their 22,000 motors capacity is 20,000 for new builds and 2,000 for repowers. Next year maybe it goes back to the expected 15,000 and 5,000. If not, then maybe the realize their demand expectations were wrong and expanding the production facility may be warranted. But don't jump the gun.
Not only Demand surpasses Supply, but in this case, 20 sum versions hurts also. Ocean/XS/Ver/White/Black/Long/Xtra Long/ all divide the Line's capacity.

But it is still. like a Vehicle Crate Engine for $3000 profit, or Boat Package for $10000 Profit. You decide. Until Production Matches Excess, Repowers will get Second Consideration.
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Old 01-14-2019, 11:44 AM
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Keep calling around to your local dealers. I was told 8-10 months in May '18 and the same in October '18. After making my calls one day I spoke with the Mercury dealer at my marina and he had a pair of 225 DTS ETA mid-November that the original buyer just cancelled because of the wait time. I brought him a check the same day.
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Old 01-14-2019, 12:51 PM
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Was at the Houston Boat show this past weekend. Dealer in Houston has the new V6 200 and V8 250 in stock, along with the 150's. Not sure how many they have, but the 200 in 25" was being sold for $13,200.
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Old 01-14-2019, 03:39 PM
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Sad..........if Yamaha would have planned better, then Mercury would not have their shortage!
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Otseg View Post
Kudos to the manufacturers in automotive and marine engines that build these complex machines that must have every single part in place in order to ship. But.......

My Sister in Law did purchasing for Hewlett Packard then Honda for the plant that made Accords. One every 59 seconds. She and some other Honda employees were sent to a vendor to work the night shift building headliners for a couple weeks one time to keep the supply chain intact. Other parts too. I had a friend build parts for them, Honda as an example and they required him to provide detailed labor and material costs. They said fine, that's what we will pay, if you want to make a profit, figure out how to make it faster / cheaper. How can a vendor ramp up without the expectation and realization of margins to fund expansion? My own labor cost has increased 30% this year. Its unlikely the engine vendors want any more volume than what they contracted for two or three years ago but have to deliver today at the old price."we lose money on every sale, but make it up in volume."
what a strange thing to say, you lose money on every sale? let's say you lose $100 on every sale, you sell 10items you lost a grand, but up the volume to 100 sales, you just lost 10 times the amount, that's a very sound business plan if I ever saw one.
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:11 PM
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Originally Posted by noelm View Post

what a strange thing to say, you lose money on every sale? let's say you lose $100 on every sale, you sell 10items you lost a grand, but up the volume to 100 sales, you just lost 10 times the amount, that's a very sound business plan if I ever saw one.
Not sure how it works in the Marine industry, but I know certain automobile manufacturers give bonuses/incentives to dealerships that meet certain levels of volume sales. Say the dealership loses 10k in combined sales but gets a 50k bonus for meeting the sales volume goal, they are then in the green. That's where volume really makes a difference.
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:13 PM
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Then the statement that you lose money on every sale is simply not true is it?
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:40 PM
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With the constant horror stories of backlogs going from 6 months to 9 months or longer my opinion would be I can’t trust anyone.

Being winter and your boat is out of the water I would call every dealer within 50 then 100 then 200 miles and try to get the engine installed during the winter, find an engine put down a deposit bring the boat to them in Feb or March.

if your dealer at home does not understand that you had to travel do to the shortage than he is an idiot, I think everyone would take your service.
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Old 01-14-2019, 04:52 PM
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I wonder what happened to that thread where someone said they ordered a motor and paid a deposit and the dealer came back saying the price of the engine was higher due to new year new pricing and the motor wasnt delivered in the year it was ordered?
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Old 01-14-2019, 05:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Whaler27 View Post
I read it. But it doesn't change anything. I still wonder whether the die casting process has the same yield rate as the prior casting process. That is the significant change in their production of the new outboards versus the old and with the old they didn't seem to have a supply problem.
Didn't have anything like the surge in demand that the new ones are seeing? The Verado's and Opti's were steady sellers. And as, someone else said, you'd have to put the new boats outfitting first, not repowers. Situation doesn't appear to be any better here in Australia, I dropped in to the local dealer who supplied my 150 4s earlier in the year, and he said he can't get any of the new v-6 and v-8 models for floor stock, and would be looking at 6 months wait min. for a new re-power order. In fact, the only one I've seen in the wild down here was on the back of a new Bayliner, when I was in New Zealand a few weeks ago.
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