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Winter worry

Old 01-11-2019, 05:38 PM
  #21  
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I’m definitely leaving mine in the water. I’ve never been much for putting it in, taking it out every time I want to go do a little fishing. Fortunately living in the south there are MANY spring like days in the winter for being out on the lake. Besides the striper form hugh schools in January and February. I appreciate some of the replies I’ve gotten, some from knowledgeable people, some from nervous nelly’s, and some from very bored people.
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Old 01-11-2019, 10:31 PM
  #22  
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From the weatherspark website:
"
In Jefferson City, the summers are long, warm, and muggy; the winters are short, very cold, and wet; and it is partly cloudy year round. Over the course of the year, the temperature typically varies from 30F to 87F and is rarely below 16F or above 92F."

All it takes is one rare cold day and/or night even if the boat is in the water, and a RW-cooled block can be toast . That's expensive. Remember fresh raw water freezes at 4 * F higher temp than SW. and the block on an open boat may not get much chill relief from the surrounding water.

Just keep your eye on the forecasts if you are going to try to leave it unwinterized, and make sure to deifinitely get down there in plenty of time and responsibly winterize if temps are forecast get critical. For sure that's harder to want to do when its cold or freezing ( or dark and windy ) already. As other have pointed out, protection requirements for I/O and I/B engines are a lot different & critically more involved than for O/Bs.

Best learn now what all you need to do on your specific boat & engine in case you see a dangerous forecast later and have non- tox A/fF ready.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:53 AM
  #23  
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If the dealer says its a closed system (and the are actually right!) you then have to find out is it a full system including the exhaust manifolds or just a half system (block+heads, but manifolds+elbows are raw water cooled). If a full system, you must then drain the heat exchanger (very expensive if the raw water in it freezes and splits the case, remember), the hoses going to the raw water pump, if its a Volvo or Bravo system and the exhaust elbows. If its a half system you must do all that plus drain the exhaust manifolds.

Do not poo-poo the risk of freezing weather cold enough to crack cast iron. I recall an ice storm across the South that did a lot of expensive damage and collapsed roofs over slips as well. If you REALLY want to leave a boat in the water over the winter an outboard is what you want. I like inboards and I/Os but I'd never leave one in the water unless: it had full closed cooling, the dock/slip had a bubbler to keep the water around it from freezing and the marina had some kind of back up if the power went out.
Also do you have liability insurance, in case the bellows leaked and the boat sank, which will put gasoline and oil into the water. The clean up from this, can nearly bankrupt you, unless your ins covers it.
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Old 01-12-2019, 07:59 AM
  #24  
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My boat, twin I/O stays in the water in the winter time in NC.. I've never ever had a problem with it.. We did have about 2 weeks last year where the water was frozen, about 2" on the top.. I have a heater in the engine compartment that kicks on at 40 degrees.. I also leave a heater running in the cabin to keep everything in there nice and warm.. You shouldn't have any problems at all in TN
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:26 AM
  #25  
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I'm here to tell you that you can crack a block with a boat in the water...I'm in SC.

Here's what I do now.
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:48 AM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by jeffnick View Post
I'm here to tell you that you can crack a block with a boat in the water...I'm in SC.

Here's what I do now.
Your joking right. You put a non-ignition protected heater in your engine compartment and then COVER the vents?
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Old 01-12-2019, 08:50 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by gregb5220 View Post
Your joking right. You put a non-ignition protected heater in your engine compartment and then COVER the vents?
#natural selection
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Old 01-12-2019, 10:35 AM
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Here in SE NC, last winter we had a cold snap that wrecked several inboard engines and sank a few boats from through-hull plumbing freezing. It was about 15-20F at night several nights. Unusual, but it happens every few years.

In TN, you could easily get cold snaps like that, and probably worse than here.

I leave my inboard boat in the water year round here in NC. If we are going to get a cold snap, I go down and start up the engine and let it run like 20min to build a little heat in the engine room. That protects it fine overnight. The fresh water plumbing for sinks, shower, etc get drained.

Are you close enough to go start the engine the evening before a cold night?
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:11 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Corndog38 View Post
Here in SE NC, last winter we had a cold snap that wrecked several inboard engines and sank a few boats from through-hull plumbing freezing. It was about 15-20F at night several nights. Unusual, but it happens every few years.

In TN, you could easily get cold snaps like that, and probably worse than here.

I leave my inboard boat in the water year round here in NC. If we are going to get a cold snap, I go down and start up the engine and let it run like 20min to build a little heat in the engine room. That protects it fine overnight. The fresh water plumbing for sinks, shower, etc get drained.

Are you close enough to go start the engine the evening before a cold night?
No Im about 90 miles away, dealership is going to show me where to drain the manifolds if I choose to do that. They said its easy to do on this 4.3 Volvo Penta. If worse comes to worse Ill install a boatsafe heater, no fuss, no muss.
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:30 AM
  #30  
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Manifolds, heat exchanger, and hoses leading to your V/P raw water pump. Heater is a good idea generally, but what if an ice storm knocks out the power. To convince yourself of the need to really take this seriously, I suggest you go on to the volvo penta parts catalog page and price out what the bill for parts would be if it froze. The h/e is about a grand, the raw water pump, 300--400 and the exhaust manifolds, well if they have cat converters in them, figure on 2500-3000 PER SIDE. Then add labor if you're not your own mechanic like many of us are. Just letting you know the costs involved in betting wrong.....
Also people in coastal regions never get as much cold weather as inland. You are inland so you can't go by what people from NC or SC say. We are costal LI and its at least 10 degrees colder just to the north of NYC. Consistently every year.
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Old 01-12-2019, 11:45 AM
  #31  
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Originally Posted by tmise View Post

No Im about 90 miles away, dealership is going to show me where to drain the manifolds if I choose to do that. They said its easy to do on this 4.3 Volvo Penta. If worse comes to worse Ill install a boatsafe heater, no fuss, no muss.
Just hope the power doesn't go out or breaker trip! I would not rely on a heater without a sensor relaying me real-time temperature info...
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Old 01-12-2019, 12:27 PM
  #32  
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A wireless temp sensor transmitter in the bilge would be a great idea, as long as you are not too far away.
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Old 01-13-2019, 06:34 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
No need as long as it stays in the water. The I/O leg stays submerged, so your block won't freeze, even if night temps fall below 32. People run into problems when they panic and pull their boat out of the water when they know cold weather is coming, and then don't get a chance to winterize before the temp drops that night.

No sense in messing around with the risks of a heater if not needed. Just make sure gas is stabilized and nothing is connected (other than VHF and bilge) to the batteries. Dead batteries can freeze, but charged ones are fine.
I agree, thanks for your input!
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Old 01-13-2019, 04:38 PM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by mystery View Post
There are more risks with leaving an I/O in the water. Almost everyone I know with an I/O does not leave in the water and their boats are on the hard for winter. I never left my boat with IOs in but my boat with straight shaft inboards I am not worried.
If you don't winterize, it's much safer to keep it in the water. The I/O leg will keep everything warmer than it would stay on the hard if it's 10 degrees out. Ocean water here, even it the dead of winter, is usually in the mid to high 30's. It's only when you take it out that stuff freezes. I always pull mine, but I immediately winterize it before we get a deep freeze.

Hope that clarifies.
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Old 01-14-2019, 06:00 AM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by jobowker View Post
If you don't winterize, it's much safer to keep it in the water. The I/O leg will keep everything warmer than it would stay on the hard if it's 10 degrees out. Ocean water here, even it the dead of winter, is usually in the mid to high 30's. It's only when you take it out that stuff freezes. I always pull mine, but I immediately winterize it before we get a deep freeze.

Hope that clarifies.
It might help when the water temp is significantly higher than air temp and only then may only keep engine room temp a few degrees higher than air temp. Once it gets cold, cold will penetrate into an engine compartment, through vents, etc. There was a cold snap in early-to-mid November this year... was 15-20 degrees for a couple nights... water temp was 50+ degrees... my engine room temp dropped significantly so I went out to buy a heater. Any ways, that was not really what I was talking about as inboard engines have the same concerns with freezing temps and engines. I meant that there could be issues with bellows, water in lower units, etc.
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