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Three Lost in Oregon Bar-Crossing - Newport, OR

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  • 1 Post By Shake N Bake Sportfishing (formerly Colbachlaw)
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Three Lost in Oregon Bar-Crossing - Newport, OR

Old 01-09-2019, 01:41 PM
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Default Three Lost in Oregon Bar-Crossing - Newport, OR

Tough deal...

Prayers for the families...



U.S. Coast Guard Air Facility Newport and Station Yaquina Bay responded to an escort request for the Dungeness boat Mary B II. The boat capsized
while crossing the bar in 12- to 14-foot seas. All three crew were lost. U.S. Coast Guard Pacific Northwest photo


Three lost in Oregon bar-crossing: Dungie boat Mary B II capsized
ByJessica Hathaway January 9, 2019

The crew of the Dungeness boat Mary B II requested a Coast Guard escort to cross the bar in Newport, Ore.’s Yaquina Bay on Tuesday night. The bar was restricted because of
12- to 15-foot seas.

The 42-foot wooden boat capsized while waiting for the escort. Two of the crew were pitched overboard. James Lacey, 48, from South Toms River, N.J., was pulled from the
water. Joshua Porter, 50, of Toledo, Ore., was discovered onshore shortly after midnight. Both were unresponsive, the Coast Guard reported. Lacey was declared dead at
the hospital, and Porter was pronounced dead at the scene.

The skipper, identified as Stephen Biernacki, 50, from Barnegat Township, N.J., was trapped in the wheelhouse. The Coast Guard reported last night that he had not survived
but was not recoverable immediately. He was eventually pronounced dead at the scene.

“We did everything we could. Unfortunately, it was just a tragic outcome. And our hearts and thoughts are with the family and friends of the crew,” said U.S. Coast Guard
Petty Officer Levi Reed.

The season opened on Jan. 4, in stormy seas.

The Newport fleet was a draw for “Deadliest Catch” producers, which launched a spin-off, “Deadliest Catch: Dungeon Cove,” based on the dangers of crossing the bar in the
often-stormy Pacific crab season.

https://www.nationalfisherman.com/un...tIzfiW4XJsaClo
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Old 01-09-2019, 01:53 PM
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It is unfortunate that our system in the NW encourages crabbers to go out when it is lousy.

Alaska has catch shares, so you can take your time getting your crab.

OR and WA commercial crabbing is a race to drop your pots and pull them as fast as you can, regardless of weather.

Most of the NW crabbing $$ is made in the first few months, so the fear is that if you don't fish them, you could lose much of your income for the season.

Around 10 years ago a crab boat went out when they should not have.

In the NW (maybe everywhere) the CG cannot close the bars to commercial fishermen.

The CG had a 47' MLB a few seconds away, but there is only so much the CG can do- you can watch the video here:

If the NW fishery went to catch shares, less people would die, the CG would not have to risk their lives, and crabbers might even make more $$.
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:21 PM
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Wow. RIP to the crew and their families.
2 are from close by in NJ to me. Very sad.
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Old 01-09-2019, 02:43 PM
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rip to the fisherman and prayers for the family . that's some nasty shit ! those regulations should go away as people need to make a living but not assume that kinda risk. I understand that people pick there jobs but to be forced to go in those conditions sucks -god speed
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Old 01-09-2019, 03:33 PM
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Very sad.

Two questions, just because I dont deal with inlets much, especially inlets like that.

1. Why would they not wait outside the bar until conditions subsided?

2. When you call the CG for an escort crossing the bar, what do they do?
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:11 PM
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Greg,

It looks like they waited out the outgoing tide and were coming in an hour or two after low, which is not ideal, but way better than few hours earlier.

I looked at a sort of nearby buoy this AM and it was 15' at 8 seconds- I have no idea what that looks like and hopefully never will, and the was an offshore buoy in deep water, on the bars the waves can double the offshore waves.

The forecast was getting worse not better, like a bunch worse with gusts to 48 knots.

They likely had a 7 knot boat, which limits your options and probably could not keep up with the seas on the way in.

There is a good chance that they could not turn around if they wanted to, as they had a ton of ocean pushing them and a real tight period.

A CG escort can do pretty much what you can see in the video I posted, wait and try and help.

I have no idea how you can pick someone out of 15' (or bigger on the bar) breaking waves while trying not to get rolled yourself.

I am glad I don't have to leave the dock to pay my bills, but a lot of guys do and sometimes they don't come back.

It sucks all the way around and it has happened before and will happen again.

Mike C
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by gregb5220 View Post
Very sad.

Two questions, just because I dont deal with inlets much, especially inlets like that.

1. Why would they not wait outside the bar until conditions subsided?

2. When you call the CG for an escort crossing the bar, what do they do?
If they dont pick up the traps the catch dies?
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Old 01-09-2019, 05:36 PM
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Originally Posted by solarfry View Post


If they dont pick up the traps the catch dies?
i thought the coast guard can close the inlet if the bar is too big to cross. From that netflix west coast tuna show. I am on the east coast so what do I know.
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:34 PM
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Latest chatter on IFish says they went too far north of the jetty and were turning around when the CG boat was near. Big waves (some say 20 footers) and broached.
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:52 PM
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Anyone know the NOAA chart number for this inlet? Just curios about the area. Not familiar with the west coast
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Old 01-09-2019, 08:09 PM
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We can only speculate as to why they felt it was necessary to come in at night just an hour after low tide. Could be low on fuel--food, illness? Although the "Bar is closed". the CG cannot stop a vessel which runs it. They still have to risk their lives if a boat does and rolls. We had one instance where we had asked a similar harbor West Coast Harbor CG if the bar was open, as we were leaving. We were cleared--and took a 12' breaker over the bow. Our 46 foot motor sailor was designed for heavy conditions--and no damage--but the bar was immediately closed. We once asked for an escort--and a RIB was sent out. When I got in safely, I asked what good the RIB would do---"pick up the remains".

Tragedy--the skipper and one crew were from the East Coast--Had bought the boat only a few months ago.
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Old 01-10-2019, 04:42 PM
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Originally Posted by gregb5220 View Post
Anyone know the NOAA chart number for this inlet? Just curios about the area. Not familiar with the west coast
NOAA Chart # is 18581. But you can also find good detail charts on the Navionics charts on line. I am told that the Mary B was North of the jetties, and CG had advised to go back to sea--as Altamaha noted--that the boat had already rolled/broached by the time the CG got there.

The sea buoy (Gr #1) is about one nautical mile seaward of the North Jetty. #3 Buoy is about 1/2 nautical mile from the Jetties. The bearing to the North Jetty (61*) is the same as the range for the entrance--61*. I have always found it prudent to round outward of the sea buoy before running the range over a bar. The depth of the channel was 25' in Sept 2018. Many think the boat would have made it if she had been in the channel. It is easy to be disoriented by fatigue, heavy weather, mist/fog etc.
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Old 01-10-2019, 05:01 PM
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Yea Pacific NW can have weather that will make your knuckles white. I am sitting at the keyboard now, 5PM, dusk, 2 miles from salt water. The fog is sliding up the hills from the bay. Visibility now maybe 40 yards, I can just make out the front gate, about 30 yards from the window. Add some heavy seas and being in a small boat and the pucker factor will climb very high.

Years ago the outdoor editor of the Portland Oregonian called the ports like Newport and Coos Bay "Chinks in an Armored Shore". So true.
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Old 01-12-2019, 06:32 AM
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Originally Posted by thataway View Post
NOAA Chart # is 18581. But you can also find good detail charts on the Navionics charts on line. I am told that the Mary B was North of the jetties, and CG had advised to go back to sea--as Altamaha noted--that the boat had already rolled/broached by the time the CG got there.

The sea buoy (Gr #1) is about one nautical mile seaward of the North Jetty. #3 Buoy is about 1/2 nautical mile from the Jetties. The bearing to the North Jetty (61*) is the same as the range for the entrance--61*. I have always found it prudent to round outward of the sea buoy before running the range over a bar. The depth of the channel was 25' in Sept 2018. Many think the boat would have made it if she had been in the channel. It is easy to be disoriented by fatigue, heavy weather, mist/fog etc.
Thanks..I hate looking at navionics I think the symbols are ridiculous. Much more comfortable looking at a real chart
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